Unexpected result from a simple sprocket change

Discussion in 'Trials' started by phoenixfire, Jun 9, 2013.

  1. phoenixfire

    phoenixfire Adventurer

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    Forgive me if I brag a little bit on the most amazing thing that happened to me today on my bike. I own a 2007 Sherco 125 and have been riding since November. Never touched a motorcycle of any kind before that. It's been quite a learning curve to be sure. The main problem I've had is learning throttle control on the 125. It was such a big leap from idle to top speed, felt like it was all or nothing with no inbetween. Most of my rides were spent with me getting behind the throttle half the time resulting in some pretty spectacular crashes, with the other half spent stalling out because I was so afraid of giving throttle that I wouldn't give any at all. It got so bad I started looking for other bikes, not that I needed more power but I needed something that had a smoother acceleration. Otherwise it was only a matter of time before I was going to get behind the throttle at the wrong time and seriously hurt myself.
    The problem with getting another bike was that I have zero cash flow for buying new toys. So we had to look for another solution. Fortunately my friend Mike is also our mechanic, and he suggested putting a bigger rear sprocket on her (a 56 instead of the 48 that she currently had). The front was already on a 9 tooth sprocket, as low as it could go. I was a little dubious but at this point I was willing to try anything.
    Today was the first test, and may I say that the results were AMAZING! It cut her top speed (which was fine because its a trials bike, its not meant to go fast) without sacrificing her power response. The biggest thing is that her acceleration became gradual. Instead of rocketing from idle to top end, I was able to control the throttle. The best part was even when I wicked it wide open, I never felt like I was in danger of being left behind. Instead of overshooting hills and rocketing down lines without time to process and think, resulting in numerous crashes, I was actually able to maintain control and precision and hit some new lines that I never would have dreamed of riding even a week ago! And before anyone asks, I still had plenty of power to go up hills, and even a fairly steep bank with some wicked roots set into them. The other week when we tried it, I failed miserably. Today I went up them first time like they weren't even there.
    So if anyone out there is having trouble with their 125, I highly recommend this!!! I'm not a mechanic but speaking as an inexperienced rookie who needs a bike who gives her confidence and control, this made an astounding difference! I can't wait for my next ride and see what else I can learn to do now! :D
    #1
  2. Bob_M

    Bob_M Been here awhile

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    You should get a slow progression throttle if you do not already have one. It will slow down throttle action giving you more control especially just off idle.

    I got mine from Stu at Jacks Cycle and it made a noticable difference. Talk to Stu, he is a great guy always willing to help.
    #2
  3. UtahGuido

    UtahGuido Long timer

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    Those 125s sound like fun.

    And congrats on the learning experience.
    #3
  4. wawarides

    wawarides where's Laura0107?

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    Congratulations, phoenixfire! I'm learning on a 125 too, but mine is a 4-stroke Scorpa. Throttle control is something I have to practice a lot. Mine has a fast-turn Domino throttle, but I'd like to try the slow-turn. I do have mine geared down to where I can putt along without using any clutch. My right hand has a couple of plastic joints, a couple of fused joints, and a couple more with limited range of motion, so I don't have a normal grip. It keeps things interesting. I've totally joined the dark side, though. My other bikes are so ignored.
    #4
  5. Twin-shocker

    Twin-shocker Long timer

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    Using the clutch in conjunction with throttle is the way to ride a 125, and is something that doesnt require replacement parts, and isnt particularly difficult to learn.
    #5
  6. lineaway

    lineaway Long timer

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    Mr. Troll, what happened to the great idea of no clutch twin shocks will teach the new riders faster?

    Phoenixfire glad it is working for you!
    #6
  7. phoenixfire

    phoenixfire Adventurer

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    Haha Laura welcome to the dark side! Unlike the force its totally a good thing. I have the slow turn throttle on my sherco and I can't imagine having the fast turn. I still have to use the clutch on mine even on idle, which is fine because I need to fine tune my clutch control. I was so jerky and unpredictable with the throttle before that my clutch control was clunky and I'd just get frustrated. Now even if I accidentally dump the clutch she doesn't shoot forward on me anymore. I love it!
    #7
  8. jonnyc21

    jonnyc21 Trials Ninja

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    Congratulations, my wife is right there with both of you, her TXT pro 125 has the larger sprocket and that helps her plenty, I have thought about getting her a slow turn throttle but she seems to be doing quite well with the one that's on there now so we will see.

    The dark side is the best! :evil
    #8
  9. Twin-shocker

    Twin-shocker Long timer

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    Seems weird you are suggesting I am a troll, possibly due to my correcting nonsense you posted about needing to increase jet sizes to compensate for lower air density at altitude?

    And yes a while riding an old twin-shock will teach any rider the basic skills an awful lot faster than a modern bike, many of which will be simply too powerful for new riders.

    As to clutch use on twin-shock bikes, things like Fantic's must be ridden on the clutch pretty much all the time, but this is impossible on the older Spanish bikes as the clutches on them dont work that great when used in the modern style.
    #9
  10. GrayEagleRider

    GrayEagleRider Been here awhile

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    I don't see anything weird about inmates suggesting that you are a troll. I have seen multiple posts suggesting that you are a troll lately and I don't spend a lot of time in this forum.

    One trend with many of your posts is that you form an opinion on a given subject and "cherry pick" information to reinforce your agenda such as twin shock bikes and open face helmets.

    I see your logic of having beginners learn on a bike that has a smooth power delivery vs the bigger punchy bikes that all the youtube heroes are riding. However, there are plenty of modern bikes that have smooth power and also have the benefit of better brakes, suspension, and clutch. A new rider will be able to focus on the basic riding techniques much more on a smooth modern bike vs having to over compensate for old components on a vintage bike.

    From what I have seen on this forum most inmates "get" this logic of modern bikes vs twin-shocker bikes WRT new riders with the exception of you, but I guess your moniker says it all.
    #10
  11. jonnyc21

    jonnyc21 Trials Ninja

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    I have always felt a smaller smooth bike is a good choice. On a second note I also agree that a modern bike has some great benefits over the tech of a vintage bike. That is why the first trials bike in the family was my wife's 2008 TXT Pro 125. Couldn't have been a better fist bike for my wife and as it turns out me.

    Now I have a 4RT and love it! :clap
    #11