Using pulleys to pick up a bike.

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by GarrettRB, May 11, 2013.

  1. Urban Toreador

    Urban Toreador Banned

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    [​IMG]
    #21
  2. flei

    flei cycletherapist

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    By the way, if you add a couple of prusik hitches, this is called a "z-drag" set-up in the rescue world. NRS, PSSOR and others sell heavy duty "rescue ready" versions of this online for big $$$$ (e.g., $179)! If you are hauling a bike, not a person, it's not a matter of life or death so I think the $20 game hoist might suffice!
    #22
  3. GarrettRB

    GarrettRB Bike Nerd

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    There's also the matter of leverage when choosing a system. z-drag is 3:1 where pulleys can give you more if needed.
    #23
  4. Flashmo

    Flashmo Whatever...

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    #24
  5. SocalRob

    SocalRob Long timer

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    I can pick up my GSA about 9 out of 10 times. For some reason, footing, gas in the tank, or altitude, a few times I've had trouble. I bought a light weight snow mobile high lift jack that packs down small and weighs about six lbs. I keep it in my top box. Since I bought it a few years back I have not needed it, but one never knows when it will come in handy.
    #25
  6. flei

    flei cycletherapist

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  7. max384

    max384 Bandaided

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    I love how so many people dismiss this type of idea and say to get a smaller bike or learn to lift. While these are both valid suggestions, so is carrying a self-recovery kit. I don't understand the mindset of ridiculing this type of idea. If you don't think you'll use it, than move on.

    I may consider something like this for my dualsport. I was actually out trail riding over the weekend by myself and broke my leg. I could just barely lift up my KLR250 with my injury. If it were any bigger of a bike, I don't think I could have done it. I'm a fairly big guy and lift weights regularly, so picking up a bike, even larger street bikes has never been overly difficult for me. However, with an injury that all changes. Lifting up that sub-300lb bike took every last ounce of strength and willpower I had. Absolutely no way I would have been able to pick up a full size bike like that.
    #27
  8. levain

    levain STILL Jim Williams

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    You're way to nice of a guy to hang out in these parts:lol3
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  9. Sparrowhawk

    Sparrowhawk Long timer

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    It is a mindset issue. First you bring a self-recovery kit, add an electric air pump, full-sized tire irons, front and rear UHD tubes, vice-grip pliers, spares of every part that could conceivingly break, and the list of the things that might come in handy goes on and on. It is one sure way to guarentee that you will need the self-recovery kit in a tip over.
    #29
  10. GarrettRB

    GarrettRB Bike Nerd

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    Which jack is it? How do you hook it to the bike when lifting it?
    #30
  11. blitzkreig

    blitzkreig Been here awhile

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    I always wondered what one of those Boss Hoss bikes would be like to pickup. They usually have a Small Block Chev v8 engines in them like a 350. If lifting one of them didn't give you a hernia I don't know what would ...
    #31
  12. Lost Roadie

    Lost Roadie Rider

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    Lightweight bike.

    Check.

    Attitude needed for solo adventures.

    Check.

    But when the bike gets off the trail on a 45º angle of a mountainside with nowhere to go but back up onto the trail I depend on a Adventure Engineering EZ Pull to help get myself out.


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    It packs down to about the size of a pack of smokes and combined with a couple of slings and carabiners makes for a very small and lightweight recovery system. With these few items and a 15' tow strap I also stash behind my headlight I'm very prepared for recovering my or anyone else's bike while out riding, carried it for years before needing it but was glad to have the right tool for the job when I did. I also carry an Enduro Star trail stand that I could pound into the ground to provide an anchor point if there's nothing else around.

    The EZ Pull™ is an extremely compact hand block and tackle system. Small enough to fit into a pocket or small toolkit.
    500 pound capacity with 5:1 reduction ration
    Can be configured for other ratios less than 5:1
    48' of Spectra® cord give 9' of pull
    Weight is less than half a pound






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    #32