valve cover leaking after valve check

Discussion in 'GS Boxers' started by mtrdrms, Dec 4, 2012.

  1. pcwirepro

    pcwirepro Aspiring Adventurer

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    #21
  2. def

    def Ginger th wonder dog

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    Look, if JVB has success with his procedure, I wanna know about it.

    Here's what I do when I remove my OHV gaskets. I use a paper towel to clean them and dry them of oil using care not to damage the mounting tabs . Then, I use another paper towel to wipe clean the mating surfaces on the OHV cover and cylinder head. I examine the donut for damage and re-seat it correctly on the OHV cover spark plug gallery.

    Next, I check the valve mufflers to insure they are fixed correctly to their respective mountings. (How many of you even re-install these things under your OHV covers?)

    Then, I hang the gasket carefully on the alignment stubs and fit the OHV cover straight onto the cylinder head. Don't cock the OHV cover. That's how the donut gets off center and eventually leaks.

    I snug (careful here...snug only...no torque wrench needed...like you're bottoming a screw into soft wood) the 4 OHV cover bolts beginning at the bottom working up to the top.

    No runs, no hits, no errors and no leaks. Oh, and by the way, I use synthetic engine oil which reputedly causes oil leaks. :eek1
    #22
  3. def

    def Ginger th wonder dog

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    A comment on the use of a torque wrench, I don't use one except on the rear wheel bolts.

    Torque wrenches, especially the beam and pointer design are inaccurate and often make tightening a fastener clumsy and potentially inaccurate.

    Develop a feel for the tightening of the various fasteners you routinely install. For example, the oilhead has 8 valve adjustor nuts that must be snugged each time valve lash is disturbed and reset. I never use a torque wrench for this. Develop a feel for the correct amount of torque to apply. Its common sense.

    Think about securing a wood screw into soft wood...how much force do you apply to eliminate the chance of stripping out the wood threads? Use the same thought process when securing fasteners onto you bike or car. You are often better off with less torque rather than more. Also, are you threading into ferrour or non-ferrous parent material? It makes a difference. Alloy is buttery and thread damage is likely if you over tighten.

    Yes, a torque wrench is needed if you are tightening engine, clutch and wheel fasteners. The rest? I use feel. I have yet to loose a screw or bolt on my 2001 GS and have not lost a thread.
    #23
  4. Dan Alexander

    Dan Alexander only happy when sad

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    ^

    Tighter till you feel it just loosen and then leave it alone.
    #24
  5. def

    def Ginger th wonder dog

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    ....and then, go get a Helicoil...yer gonna need it.
    #25
  6. Dan Alexander

    Dan Alexander only happy when sad

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    :evil

    I read that in a guys sig line somewhere, thought it was pretty funny as I've done it a few times myself ... not intentionally but it does teach what you describe to a T.

    As in life, You never know how far you can go till you go too far a few times :deal
    #26
  7. pcwirepro

    pcwirepro Aspiring Adventurer

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    I just installed Helicoils on all 8 holes. Previous owner and dealer made a mess of them.
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  8. def

    def Ginger th wonder dog

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    Nowadays, I have little reason to remove the OHV covers on my 2001. The valve lash just doesn't require adjustment that often...maybe annually. Well, if reasonable care is used, you'll never experience damaged OHV cover threads. But, one episode with a mechanic with poor skills or little experience and....well, its Helicoil time as you point out.

    It is unlikely you'll ever have problems with these threads again (leave the torque wrench in the toolbox).

    Wish you had photos.
    #28
  9. MotorradMike

    MotorradMike MIL-TFD-41

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    Hmmm

    My Haynes covers all 1100 and 1150 models and says 8Nm.
    My cd from BMW doesn't cover the1150(just the 1100GS) but also says 8Nm for that model.
    I wonder if they changed the spec for 1150s and Haynes got it wrong???

    BTW:
    Whenever I see a member quote a torque spec not strong in my memory, I look it up if I have time.
    Nobody here wants to help someone hurt their bike.
    Just good practice IMHO.
    No harm, no foul.
    #29
  10. lhendrik

    lhendrik Truffle Rustler

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    What is a valve muffler?
    #30
  11. Dan Alexander

    Dan Alexander only happy when sad

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    It comes in a kit with the blinker fluid.
    #31
  12. mike54

    mike54 You don't get me

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    [​IMG]


    I would think he's talking about part number 11. It's called a rubber buffer on the parts list.
    #32
  13. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid!

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    Let me clarify. When I say I do not dry them that does not mean I do not wipe them clean. To truely make them dry you would need to remove all traces of oil. This I do not do. I wipe off the liquid oil and any dirt. That is it. In doing so there is a film of oil on the gaskets. There is no need to remove that film (you would need an oil solvent to do this, which would dry out the rubber). I have done it this way on thousands of valve adjusts, and never a leak.

    That said, if it makes you feel better, wipe them dry, clean them with solvents, and change them every few years. I have never replaced a set of gaskets except the donut gasket when improperly installed.

    Jim :brow

    PS I also do not follow the exact process for valve adjustment as prescribed by the factory, among other steps that make more sense other ways.:deal
    #33