War and Pieces- Soviet Sidecar Rig Resurrection

Discussion in 'Hacks' started by MotoJ, Feb 28, 2012.

  1. MotoJ

    MotoJ Mobtown Hacker

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    Inside a machined trough in the rear bearing retainer lives a felt seal, like the mainseal in a BMW. If I had been slick I would have asked Jerry the machinist to mill one side out so I could use a Nitrile seal or something, but I forgot. This felt seal is new, all the way from Estonia. I primed it with 90 wgt and squished it in with my fingers.

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    I had the bearing in the retainer and hammered onto the crank and some bolts started, and was feeling pretty proud of myself when I looked down and saw the bearing cover washer and the evil "wavy-washer", bane of all Russian motor-rebuilders, lying on the bench. F**K!
    So, had to get the puller out and try again.

    The "wavy-washer" is the theme of a few web-threads that I read. No one is 100% certain where it goes on each model bike, it seems to me. It doesn't show up on some of the parts explosions, even. It's meant to serve as a spacer to keep the bearing off the slinger, or as an end-play eliminator, just before the flywheel. That's where mine was when I took it apart, so that's where I put it when reassembling...

    You can just see it in there....
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    Next, a poor safety wire job. I have to get some of those cool pliers...

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    Last bearing is the cam bearing. It has its own retainer plate the keeps it snug in the case..

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    Finally the timing gears get pounded back on. The lower one was a challenge. I finally ended up putting it in the oven and carrying it down cellar with welders gloves. It went right on, heated up. the bearing plate bolts will get a crummy safety wire job with the needlenoses, too.

    Starting to look like a motor again!

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  2. MotoJ

    MotoJ Mobtown Hacker

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    I tried to shang-hai my neighbor to help me with this next bit, but he couldn't make it, so I forged on by myself. It was a little hairy, but luckily I seemed to have some extra coordination that day, rather than stumbling around and tripping over big parts, or dropping things because I had two or three tools in one hand at once, which is the case a lot of the time.

    It was a nice day- (not much winter this year), so I masked up the cylinders and got out the BBQ paint..

    While I was masking I noticed a big chunk of fin missing. I hadn't noticed that previously, and at first I was ready to blame poor Jerry the machinist, but after scrolling through all my hundreds of pics of this project, I saw where it was busted to begin with, probably long ago. Not much to do about it now. I was ashamed to have jumped to conclusions, too.

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    I gave the cylinders a few light coats and brought them in for fitment.

    I squeezed the rings together by hand, set the gaps 180 dgrs apart, and tapped the pistons into the upside down cylinders. I used a little transmission fluid for lube, since it was handy. Lube is never inappropriate! I put a circlip in one side only. Then, I took each jug with (piston skirt sticking out) to the motor, stood on a piece of 4x4, balanced the cylinder on my knee with the conrod in the end of the skirt, got the piston started in the bore, and fit the second circlip with my left hand (i'm a righty). Then I started a couple nuts on the top two studs, to hold it there so I could let go. Somehow I did this twice without incident (confession- 3 times- first time I forgot the base gasket).

    Roma Dakota weighed his cylinders and I think they were 14lbs apiece..
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    That's one of my dogs, a potential hack monkey. Looks like she got into the BBQ paint. Eh, she'll be fine....

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  3. PhiSig1071

    PhiSig1071 What's ******width?

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    Very entertaining build. Makes me want to go find an old soviet hack for me and my dog.
  4. MotoJ

    MotoJ Mobtown Hacker

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    Last bit is the flywheel. I'm leaving the valve covers off until the motor is in the frame. I posted pics of the flywheel earlier. it was pretty rough and needed a good cleaning and de-rustification.
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    Finally I got it looking fairly presentable, but after all the rust on the clutch carrier studs was gone, I could see they were cashed- big grooves where the plates had worn them away.

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    Luckily I had a new set in the parts cache. Normally these would be pressed in and out with a hydraulic press, but I don't have one, and I was feeling like I was on a roll, so out came the BFH again, and a soft metal drift. I put the new ones in the freezer while I bashed the old ones out from the back side of the flywheel.

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  5. MotoJ

    MotoJ Mobtown Hacker

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    I pounded the new ones in with the drift and the hammer. They had contracted a bit, so they went in without too much trouble. Only one felt like it went in too easily, but they all got some leftover bearing Loctite. I touched up the ends with the Dremel just to keep things neat. They all measured the same from face of flywheel to ends, so I think I'm OK.

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    With the carrier studs in, I could install the flywheel, and seal off the innards for good. Hope they are all in there correctly!

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    The big bolt holding the flywheel on the crank has another folding lock washer.

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  6. Biebs

    Biebs BMW Airhead

    Joined:
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    Ok - Just to keep you honest.

    You keep using the term "Vale Covers" on the flat head those are the "Cylinder Heads"

    But you are correct they do cover the valves!!


    Very impressed by your Tenancity to tackle this project!!! Plus the transmission !!!


    But I digress there are some sick cookies here - Leaf, Northwest, ect I think you might fit in with those guys!!!:lol3


    Great build just in time for Spring!!!:freaky
  7. MotoJ

    MotoJ Mobtown Hacker

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    You're right, Biebs. Actually, I haven't been sure what to call them. I've seen those particular parts called both names in all the threads I've been reading. I'll have to look up a Russian parts manual and see what they call them. They are cylinder heads in that they complete the combustion chamber, but they aren't cylinder heads in the same way a BMW airhead has cylinder heads, as you know- Beemer cylinder heads have the valves and springs in the head, which in turn caps the cylinder- two entirely different pieces/parts. Same with most all bikes. Then there is a valve cover that, yep, covers the valves. On this IMZ, the valves are installed in the same hunk of cast iron as the cylinder bore. The outermost piece covers the cylinder/valve hunk of iron, covering the valves and also creating the second piece of the combustion chamber. It also gives a home the the sparkplug.

    It needs it's own name. Sidevalve head cover? Flathead valve head?
  8. MotoJ

    MotoJ Mobtown Hacker

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    Flywheel in, with new clutch carrier studs. Time for the clutch...

    The old clutch plates were pretty trashed. I found a new complete set online. At least, it was supposed to be all new. Turns out the friction plates were somewhat worn. The existing friction plates had swollen up at least a millimeter and a half. I had intended to use them anyway, and cleaned them up with gas, but in the end went with the newer ones.

    It looks like the Soviets just ground up whatever they had lying around or swept up off the floor to mix up the glop they used to make the friction material.
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    The new metal plates were covered in more of that heinous Cosmoline goo, and that had to be cleaned off, too. I ended up cleaning everything I had and using plates from each set.

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    Even the springs were coated in goo.


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    Installing the clutch was pretty straightforward, especially with the motor on its nose on the bench.

    I went to the hardware store and got a few m8 bolts and nuts. I stacked up the plates and ran the bolts through to the carrier studs, then tightened the nuts until I could start the clutch screws. Piece of cake. The new clutch screw heads were a little bigger than the countersunk holes in the new outer plate, so I wasn't able to punch them. I used some medium strength blue Loctite. Hopefully that will do the trick.

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    Note that I switched to a newer outer plate at the last..

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    Check out the nifty clutch alignment tool/motor crank that I got from Crawford Sales. I saw that tool in Roma Dakota's thread and I had to have one!

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  9. arcticIndian

    arcticIndian indian rider

    Joined:
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    I used extra strong loctite when reinstalling the clutch on our k-750 in addition to punching them. The clutch started making noise and slipped last year..I used standard locktite and a light punch last time. I believe the problem is that the russian countersunk screws are a bit undersized for the internal threads in the original clutchs studs.
    Anyway, they won't come loose now..but I will need to use heat to undo the screws next time.

    Hope to work on the k-750 this weekend.. :)
  10. MotoJ

    MotoJ Mobtown Hacker

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    I may end up using something stronger too. I need to get it running and see if the clutch plates are the right thickness first. Put up some more pics of the K750- the more the merrier!
  11. MotoJ

    MotoJ Mobtown Hacker

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    Motor together and clutch in, time for the transmission. This took a couple tries fitting it all together before I sussed out the order in which it all had to go.

    First I had one last bearing to get off the mainshaft. It took a bit of work with the Dremel. I cut the outer race and a collar off first. The inner race I cut grooves in to accept the edges of the bearing puller.

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    Then everything got degreased and a had good scrub in the kitchen sink. I thought about running the case through the dishwasher, but I figured that would be overkill.

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  12. MotoJ

    MotoJ Mobtown Hacker

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    More new bearings for the main and secondary shafts. Three ball type and one roller at the output shaft to the driveshaft thingamabob.

    The bearing place sent me the shielded type, so the shields had to come out. Easy enough.

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    The first two got tapped into the bottom of the case with the wooden handle of the ball peen I had lying around. Bashed more like it, but they went in no problem.

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    First thing to go in is the kickstart gear and shaft. I had to switch out the ratchet piece first. The old spring I got out with a drill bit. The pin holding the ratchet pawl was peened over so I had to file that until it fell out with a bang against the bench.

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    Then the new piece went in with some grease and the new pin got whacked with a drift to keep it in there.

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    Finally the collar the hold the gear against the ratchet went on and that new pin got peened both ends.

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    And then it gets dropped in the bottom of the case. No bearing for this piece.

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    On the other side is a seal, a gasket, and an aluminum collar. The clutch actuation arm attaches to the collar later.

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    Then it's a matter of finding the right order to stack the gears and various bushes and spacers in so it all goes in and meshes together.

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    The other two bearings get tapped on with the handle, and then the "trap door" plate can go on. Note the end of the spring that slides down over the kickstart shaft.
    New seal for the input shaft. That bearing sheild will be removed. There's a retainer plate that covers it that has an oil passage top that side.

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    There's a hole in the back of the kickstart return spring plate that accepts the end of the spring you can see poking out in the previous pic. The spring has to be wound up so the return mechanism works. Roma Dakota told me his trick with a PVC pipe. I made my own in about twp minutes with the Dremel. Worked like a charm.

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    There's a rod that goes through the case back to front that holds the shift forks. Then the shift pattern plate shaft gets threaded through the case perpendicular to that, and the shift fork pins get lined up in the proper slots. The footshift gear thing goes on the shaft on the other side, a new seal around the splined output shaft, kickstart lever and pin get banged on, Et Voila! - it all gets buttoned up.

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  13. Leaf

    Leaf Been here awhile

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    Nag nag. ;3

    How's it going? I'm still wetting myself with the suspense. :p
  14. Pete Swede

    Pete Swede Adventurer

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    More, more, more... :wings
  15. LoJack

    LoJack Long timer

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    B.G., yo!
    Ditto!!!

    I just bought a 650 and will have it this weekend. Got a lot to learn about these things and this thread is great for seeing what's going on inside!
  16. Leaf

    Leaf Been here awhile

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    I think he got 'et by a Grue. ;_;
  17. mark883

    mark883 and the mysterians

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    I just had the trans. on my '99 R1100GS apart.

    There is a slight difference in construction and machining quality.
  18. MotoJ

    MotoJ Mobtown Hacker

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    HaHa- like what- the GS tranny doesn't look like it was made by a blacksmith?

    I've found nuts on this thing where the hole isn't even centered- different thicknesses, too. They just lopped a piece off an octagonal bar, drilled and tapped it, and called it good enough. Some of the slot head machine screws look like they were hand-slotted with a file. The slots don't even bisect the screw head in the center.

    One thing can be said, though- this machine is heavy-duty. It's a tank, really. Or a farm implement.

    With motor and transmission back together I had to address everything else. It seemed like every little bit needed some attention. At this point I hauled the frame, wheels, and front end outside one nice afternoon and washed it all down and tried to assess what needed doing....

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    Tapered headstock bearings- woohoo!
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  19. Leaf

    Leaf Been here awhile

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    :clap

    Welcome back!!!

    :lurk
  20. MotoJ

    MotoJ Mobtown Hacker

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    I found some interesting markings on the top steering head bearing dust cover. It appears to be an original piece. One thing about this rebuild is it's been hard to figure out what's original, what's not, what's missing, and what shouldn't be there. The Soviets were great about stamping or casting every part with a big part number, but the exploded views I've found on-line don't always correspond with one another, or to the the part numbers on the bike.

    I'm guessing the top cyrillic letters say Made in the Soviet Union, and the lower winged logo is the factory symbol.
    Nice fit and finish, eh?

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    Now for all the fiddly-bits. Fork rebuild first. The seals were shredded. Oil non-existent. A few oz's. of Engine-Brite turned the gritty sludge left in the tubes into something I could wash out, after an hour soaking. The lower clamp got wire-brushed and painted. The bearings got repacked- the bottom one in place, as best I could. Eventually I'll replace them.

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    I've seen cars with smaller springs...
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    More grinding of tools to fit conditions...
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    Everything washed up and out to dry..
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    Ready to go back together on the operating table..
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    Back on the bike..
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