War Room Maps

Discussion in 'Trip Planning' started by Jbone11 11, Aug 23, 2013.

  1. B.C.Biker

    B.C.Biker mighty fine

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2007
    Oddometer:
    622
    Location:
    southern interior B.C.
    :thumb Yes, know how many of you feel. I read maps like people read books. Can stand around looking at a wall map like folks sitting around a camp fire....
    Rarely do my trips ever match the planned route though.
    And was wondering how big a wall one needed for a mapbook. Guess its one hallway wall for southern B.C. and then northern on the way back!
    #21
  2. going south

    going south hero & Zero...

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2008
    Oddometer:
    1,190
    Location:
    Alaska, Mazatlan. sometimes seattle!
    this is all I use anymore...:deal

    [​IMG]
    #22
  3. rover650

    rover650 Adventurer

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2013
    Oddometer:
    25
    Location:
    AZ
    #23
  4. going south

    going south hero & Zero...

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2008
    Oddometer:
    1,190
    Location:
    Alaska, Mazatlan. sometimes seattle!
    #24
  5. Rhode trip

    Rhode trip guided by voices

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2008
    Oddometer:
    1,022
    Location:
    Coventry, RI
    [​IMG]

    I have this one on my office wall. Mrs Trip gave it to me for xmas one year. A real map gives you perspective, something that gps/computer maps don't do well at all. This one is not cheap, but they are beautifully made. (...hmmm, having looked at the other links, its not so expensive at all...)

    http://www.ravenmaps.com/prodinfo.asp?number=NA
    #25
  6. RideFreak

    RideFreak Torque Junkie

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2009
    Oddometer:
    6,528
    Location:
    Out in the NM Dez somewhere
    Maps are nice to look at and great for the blue sky type of route planning but if you're getting to the nitty gritty of planning a ride, it's not going to give you near enough detail to do it properly unless you're A. sticking to pavement or B. have access to topos for the entire route which would amount to allot of maps. Talking to locals is great if you can find those who are willing to discuss their area and actually have a knowledge of it, many don't. I've been directed off on wild goose chases by locals before and have also been directed to some really cool places only a local would know about. I wouldn't want to rely solely on that option in the western US. For detail planning Delorne sells state recreational atlas that has the topos, that's probably one of the few paper solutions that's realistic for off road planning with enough detail to be usable in remote areas. I take the atlas apart and use pages from them as a hard copy paper backup for the GPS.

    It's hard to beat doing it electronically; Topo emaps, Garmin Mapsource program and Google Earth work great here in the US. We do some rides in pretty remote areas where planning is critical so I'm talking from experience. Some riders like to wing it, not a smart idea out west, esp if you're in the desert where fuel and water isn't readily available. More than once we've come to the rescue of travelers "winging it" off the beaten path, had we not come by it might have gotten ugly. You may not want to follow a scripted itinerary but you'll want to know exactly where you're at all the time, it can be a long walk out if you have a mechanical, run out of fuel or have an injury.

    Even if you don't have a GPS rig yet, the Mapsource pgm is available for free download as well as free Topo emaps of many western states. If you want to get the routes or tracks for different rides from other inmates then you have to go electronic.

    I'd suggest getting ahold of the CDT tracks, the MS program and free topo maps and start playing around. You be amazed at the detail you can drill down to as well as having distance and elevation info right there. Paper topos are nice but you'd need a big stack of them to cover a decently long ride like the CDT which is not very realistic. Once you get the tracks into Mapsource, it will let you open them in Google Earth (There's other ways to do this but the two, mapsource and GE work well together) Once the track is open in GE, you'll have a birdseye view of your ride with the ability to drill down and look at terrain features as well as pictures people have taken in the same areas which is invaluable for locating POIs along your route. On a remote ride I'll get the tracks built, then open them up in GE, fly the entire route making note of the interesting places along the way, then go back into mapsource and make POIs of the places I've discovered in GE. When you actually begin the ride you'll have good "locational awareness" of your path which is essential if things don't go as planned.
    #26
  7. Virtual Rider

    Virtual Rider Traveler

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2005
    Oddometer:
    776
    Buy one of these for your favorite state: Delorme Atlas & Gazetters

    Then remove the pages and assemble them as wall paper. I always thought that would be cool to see.
    #27