Warm full suit - applied in cold warehouse

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by Snowlover, Jan 17, 2013.

  1. Snowlover

    Snowlover Been here awhile

    Joined:
    May 8, 2007
    Oddometer:
    218
    Location:
    Kent, WA
    If I try to warm my entire whse, I spend $10k/month to try to make it tolerable for a 12 hour shift. I tried heated Battery vests from New Zeland, but they just don't provide enough warmth.

    Full up insulated coveralls with extra clothes for warmth, are cumbersome, heavy and limit movement.

    How about a full up, high quality MC suit? Aerostich? Are they warm without bulk? Compare to a heavy Carhart?

    I need 8 of them, but 8k on suits is better than 10k/month for 4-5 months of cold work environment.
    #1
  2. MotoBoss

    MotoBoss Bad Influence

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2009
    Oddometer:
    5,337
    Location:
    Martinsville, Indiana USA
    Aerostitch suits are just a Gore Tex shell, not providing any real warmth. They do however have liners, electric and no-electric, to add to the warmth factor but also adds to the bulk factor making them more like Carhart's but waterproof.






    Move your company to south Texas...............................:lol3


    Good luck.
    #2
  3. bmac

    bmac Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2006
    Oddometer:
    835
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    Having worked in a freezer for over 20 years in temps from -25 to 0 I have seen it all. The best clothing for the money is from Refrigiwear. They are a little bulky but they do the job and they are pretty durable. You want to get both bibs and jackets instead of one piece so you can mix and match as needed along with the assorted layering that goes with it.

    http://www.refrigiwear.com/
    #3
  4. ragtoplvr

    ragtoplvr Long timer

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2007
    Oddometer:
    8,259
    Location:
    central USA
    If your workers drive electric forklifts, then electric suits and gloves become an option.

    Otherwise bulky suits it is. Ski bibs and jackets can work well for lower cost. For our unheated warehouse, the flexability of bibs and jacket I like.

    Rod
    #4
  5. Snowlover

    Snowlover Been here awhile

    Joined:
    May 8, 2007
    Oddometer:
    218
    Location:
    Kent, WA
    They are electrics. I am polling the drivers to get their input. The vests were ok, but not up to everyday industrial use. We are not cold storage, but the whse is over 100,000 sq ft, with 36 foot ceilings and store empty 12 ounce Al cans that eliminate any way to get air moving. We have gas heaters up high that keeps it from freezing, but the floor area is cold.

    Thanks for the link. Will check it out.
    #5
  6. PeterW

    PeterW Long timer

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2005
    Oddometer:
    3,409
    Location:
    Gold Coast
    I don't think bike gear is the answer.

    It's good at stopping wind, and it's abrasion resistant, but unless you are skiing behind those fork lifts @100kph those aren't advantages.

    The only thing that MIGHT be a win on industrial gear is maybe some of the electrically heated gear like jackets, gloves, boots.

    Pete
    #6
  7. _cy_

    _cy_ Long timer

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2011
    Oddometer:
    6,779
    Location:
    Tulsa, Oklahoma
    my fav for winter riding is Aerostich one piece roadcrafter with old style Gerbing jacket, pants, gloves and socks. all heated and controlled with a dual controller.

    most of the time only heated jacket and heated gloves is needed. but for really cold rides heated pants comes out. seldom have I worn heated socks. not bulky at all, but tethered to electric cord.

    would think wearing electric all day long would not be as comfortable as insulated clothing like refrigear
    #7
  8. Tom327Cat

    Tom327Cat T-Dub rider

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2007
    Oddometer:
    147
    Location:
    Palmer, Alaska
    Dragonfur fleece over loose fitting coveralls and duofold long johns.
    #8
  9. bomber60015

    bomber60015 tikkun olam

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2008
    Oddometer:
    37,968
    Location:
    Chicago-ish
    Agreed that stich isn't the answer to your needs . . . . no warmth at all . . . . .

    Is any of the phase change stuff efective enough?
    #9
  10. Yella DR

    Yella DR Let's go!

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2012
    Oddometer:
    190
    Location:
    Toronto

    Unit heaters or infared radiant tube heaters ? Unit heaters are ineffecent,noisy and very old tech.
    RTH's is the way to go.
    Bigass type ceiling fans will help too, unless you stack to the underside of the deck, which I doubt, and when reversed cool in the summer.
    We have many Bigass fans in the plant/warehouse where I work and have made noticeable comfort improvements year round.
    Just being plugged in to ones forklift makes me think that forgetfulness will become costly for you in torn out wires and lost time monkeying around with everything...

    Perhaps heated seats....
    #10
  11. gofast1320

    gofast1320 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2010
    Oddometer:
    843
    Location:
    Middle Tennessee
    Get them some of the waffle polypro shirts like the military uses for the base layer on top and make sure they wear it next to their skin. The collars keep the neck warm and the 1/4 zip front allows them to vent and control their temp. If they wear this with a heavyweight shirt and a sleeveless polartec vest with a heavy jacket and a pair of bibs they will stay warm and not be all wadded up in heavy clothes. The above with a decent fleece watch cap toboggan will make a tremendous difference in their comfort.
    #11
  12. Snowlover

    Snowlover Been here awhile

    Joined:
    May 8, 2007
    Oddometer:
    218
    Location:
    Kent, WA
    Great. Thanks for the input. Being a KLR rider, I thought a Stich was insulated and warmer. :) Never looked into one before.

    After talking to the 8 drivers, on four different shifts covering 24/7, I have 8 different opinions. I don't like the plug-in issue, Just due to the fact they get on/off quite often. That is why we went with battery vests 3 years ago.

    I think I will do the heated seat pad, Then offer them $ to decide what they would each prefer from a site like the refrig wear posted above.

    I snowmobile, so keeping warm is important, but riding sleds is very active. I get colder on my motorcycle than sledding. There is not much active movement as a forklift driver, but they can't be encumbered by tons of clothes.

    The heaters are not radiants. They were updated a few years ago to be much more efficient, but the physical location and fact that I MUST have a fully clear 33' ceiling with no intrusions to hit.
    #12