Well, that was quick.

Discussion in 'Face Plant' started by Prettyboy, May 18, 2013.

  1. Prettyboy

    Prettyboy BFLB

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2012
    Oddometer:
    572
    Location:
    Philly
    So, I managed to be the one guy in my first day of MSF range who crashed. Not dropped the bike, mind you (one or two people did that) but actually fell off at speed (well, not much speed, but still.)

    We were just getting used to turning, and when we crossed over to do the oval backwards, I got screwed up trying to get back into second, ended up coming into the turn a little hot, and taught myself the hard way why we don't break in turns.

    Didn't get hurt, other than a little scratch where the terrible gloves I was wearing ripped. My jacket has a little character now too. It could have been worse, considering I was wearing an open face helmet and sunglasses (didn't realize the helmets they provided didn't include eye protection until too late to go buy some).

    Anyway, yeah, learning experience. Other than that, first time on a bike was pretty cool.


    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    #1
  2. bobobob

    bobobob badbadbad

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2011
    Oddometer:
    6,627
    Location:
    On a hill
    It was probably the wingtips.
    #2
  3. Benesesso

    Benesesso Long timer

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2008
    Oddometer:
    9,898
    Location:
    West of Phoenix, Arizona
    Welcome to the sport. My first ride, many years ago, ended after ~5 seconds when the little minibike pitched me off and my foot slid under a chain-link fence. The ends of the wire are pretty sharp. :cry
    #3
  4. Prettyboy

    Prettyboy BFLB

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2012
    Oddometer:
    572
    Location:
    Philly
    Ha. Ha. Ha.

    Sturdiest pair of boots I have. Lace up ropers. Honestly, after riding, I think I might have had trouble with anything bulkier. Size 13s take up a lot of space.

    Sounds painful.
    #4
  5. TexaNate

    TexaNate Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2012
    Oddometer:
    416
    Location:
    North Houston
    According to my instructor, every class has a different dynamic - sometimes no one drops in the whole class but sometimes every single person drops on a given exercise.

    Frankly, I'm surprised they don't have students wear more gear for liability reasons - long sleeves, closed shoes and any helmet is all they asked for, as I recall. It's easy to forget but going down at 30mph on pavement with inadequate gear hurts and it can put you in the hospital from road rash alone.

    Riding gloves are like twenty bucks and a good full-face helmet can be found for under a hundred. Get thee to a moto shop and get yourself some more gear - you know you have to eventually.

    Also - on riding boots - it can be a pain to get used to bulkier boots (especially shifting) but you can usually rotate shift lever up on the splines to accommodate a bigger shoe, or you can buy a longer lever. The main time I get paranoid about protecting my feet is when I'm offroad with boulders and weeds and stuff but even on the street, it would suck to wreck and get skewered in the ankle by a footpeg on the way down...

    Don't let your little spill get you down - is that MSF's bike you dropped? Always best to drop someone else's machine if possible :D
    #5
  6. Prettyboy

    Prettyboy BFLB

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2012
    Oddometer:
    572
    Location:
    Philly
    That is why I was so happy I had my jacket. Didn't even get a bruise on my arm.
    Already done. I just hadn't had a chance before the class.
    I was back up and riding as soon as they would let me. Didn't really bother me at all, just kicking myself for having to learn the hard way. I figure that dropping the MSF bike in a controlled environment was probably the best place for that to happen, and I didn't get hurt.
    #6
  7. Seth650

    Seth650 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2012
    Oddometer:
    476
    Location:
    N. E. Pa.
    At my MSF class if you dropped the bike you failed immediately and had to leave. One guy did, but he was given the chance to come back and "pick up" from where he left off , test-wise.
    #7
  8. psychopompos

    psychopompos Been here awhile

    Joined:
    May 8, 2012
    Oddometer:
    112
    Location:
    Astoria, NY
    I believe that this is true only of the testing part. Dropping the bike during the exercises is considered 'OK'. Or maybe not, during my class no one dropped a bike until the test. Then all hell broke loose.
    #8
  9. SloMo228

    SloMo228 World Class Cheapass

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2012
    Oddometer:
    1,876
    Location:
    SE Michigan
    I think that's right. When I took mine (granted, it was a decade ago) people dropped a couple times during the exercises but one person failed the test just for putting a foot down.
    #9
  10. Seth650

    Seth650 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2012
    Oddometer:
    476
    Location:
    N. E. Pa.
    :loco:loco
    Yes that's right. A girl did a slow drop, and continued with the course. The guy who had to leave dropped during the skills test. I took mine on the one DR200 there, and I raised the idle speed slightly since it was bucking when doing the slow maneuvers in 1st. Test was actually fun (except for the figure 8 in the parking space, when I got all :loco but still did it )

    Seth
    #10
  11. Hesaid

    Hesaid Long timer

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2012
    Oddometer:
    1,686
    Location:
    Central CA
    While I'm not going to argue with the advice about getting some good boots, I would add that things get much better when you get to pick your own bike. Having a bike that fits you is just as nice as good fitting gear. You know how when you pull on the right pair of gloves all of your fingers just go where they belong, and your movements still feel natural? Good fitting boots don't require you to stretch and wiggle, relace... A good fitting bike is kinda like that. All of your appendages fall right into place, all the controls are right where they need to be.

    My MSF instructor repeatedly told me "Good job, you made that look as smooth as a circus bear on a bicycle could." I never did tell him that if he's seen Madagascar 3, the bear gets a Ducati."


    MV
    #11
  12. Cale_Kat

    Cale_Kat Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2006
    Oddometer:
    190
    Can't understand how this happened... the number 8 is supposed to represent balance.:norton

    Good luck.
    #12
  13. DavidBanner

    DavidBanner Banned

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2012
    Oddometer:
    1,163
    Location:
    Planet earf.
    well that should cure you from braking in turns. sounds like you're gonna be ok.
    #13
  14. viverrid

    viverrid not dead yet

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2004
    Oddometer:
    30,482
    Location:
    Western Mass
    Holy shit, look at those "barkbusters". Well I guess not for 'bark' as there are no trees on the range (that's what we call 'em on woods bikes).
    #14
  15. viverrid

    viverrid not dead yet

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2004
    Oddometer:
    30,482
    Location:
    Western Mass
    Pssst... actually we CAN brake in turns. Think of it as an 'advanced maneuver', lol. Just don't grab a big handful (or footfull) while turning.
    #15
  16. Prettyboy

    Prettyboy BFLB

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2012
    Oddometer:
    572
    Location:
    Philly
    Right this mysterious "trail breaking" I hear of. Let's pretend that the "we" in my statement meant "beginning riders."
    #16
  17. 97audia4

    97audia4 Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2012
    Oddometer:
    65
    Dont feel to bad, an instructor today ate it hard when trying to swerve to fast in a demonstration it was kinda wild.
    #17
  18. manfromthestix

    manfromthestix Lost in Space

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2004
    Oddometer:
    2,341
    Location:
    Lexington, Virginia
    Fixt. We don't wanna be "breaking" in the corners :evil, but once you've built your skills you'll learn that "braking" is just fine. I love watching MotoGP racing and seeing those guys riding just the front wheel into a corner, back tire skipping off the ground at 150+ mph, then powersliding around and out and accelerating toward 200 mph before grabbing the brakes again. It'll be a while before you have skills like that :lol3 but yes, you can brake through corners.

    So, did you finish the course? Pass it? We bought a little Suzuki TU250X like the one in your photo for my wife, sweet bike, but I imagine it was a bit small for you:

    [​IMG]

    It fit her perfectly, but she's 5'1" and about 105 pounds with teeny little feet. You sound a bit bigger :D so I agree with the above post - when you decide to get a bike for yourself, sit on a bunch of them and you'll find one that just FITS. If you're comfortable on the bike and not struggling to get the proper foot location, arm reach, knee flex, view in the mirrors, etc. you'll have a lot more of your attention available to focus on what really matters, riding safely in traffic. The learning curve of operating the bike is steep and you need to practice, practice, practice, that's for certain. The real test, though, comes when you start riding in real-world conditions of traffic, changing road surface, rain, gravel, dogs, deaf-dumb-blind idiots in cars, and a million other hazards to pay attention to. When you hit the streets your operation of the bike needs to be habitual and routine, not foremost in your mind. Proper, well-fitted gear also allows you to take your mind off that aspect of it and focus on what's happening around you. Over the years I've developed what I call a "paranoid-aggressive" riding style - assume you're invisible to the surrounding traffic and be prepared to take aggressive action to avoid being sucked into a "situation" where your safety is compromised. I emphasize - don't be an aggressive rider, just be prepared to take aggressive action to keep yourself out of dangerous situations (merging traffic, blind spots, etc.). Remember, you are INVISIBLE regardless how many lights you have on the bike or what visually-toxic colors you're wearing. Keep your "situational awareness" radar on maximum all the time.

    All that said, the concentration and focus required to ride safely is what I find so simultaneously exciting and relaxing. It is a dangerous sport and riding a bike is thrilling, but the required focus of doing it safely also takes my mind off all the other crap going on in my life and is very relaxing. Does that make sense? I remember from comic books when I was a kid, Superman would go to his Ice Fortress (whatever it was called) and he had a helmet that would clear his mind so he could relax, clear his mind of all the troubles that he was trying to help people deal with. That's what a motorcycle helmet does for me :lol3. That's my excuse, anyway, it's seriously therapeutic to go for a nice long ride.

    Best wishes to you as you begin this sport, it's been a focal point in my life for over 50 years now (since I was 5) and I can't imagine ever NOT riding motorcycles. Wooot!!

    Doug
    #18
  19. Prettyboy

    Prettyboy BFLB

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2012
    Oddometer:
    572
    Location:
    Philly
    Oddly enough, it actually fits me great (which is good, considering I bought one for a song a couple of weeks ago, before I knew how to ride at all), other than the fact that I haven't gotten used to hanging on with my knees. I would like to try and put in a slightly taller (flat) seat, to give myself a bit more play.
    #19
  20. DC2wheels

    DC2wheels Castle Anthrax troll

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2008
    Oddometer:
    2,858
    Location:
    N.H.
    Ya' know- with the helmet and glasses you are looking like Robert Patrick- the guy who played the T-1000 in Terminator 2- right after he took the motorcycle from the policeman :lol3

    Good work on the MSF class. Ride long and prosper......
    #20