Well, that was quick.

Discussion in 'Face Plant' started by Prettyboy, May 18, 2013.

  1. dwoodward

    dwoodward Long timer

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    It's the RC's job to control speed- max speed is about 20mph. In every case I've seen, actual speed when the rider hits the ground is probably less than 5mph; skin abrasion if any is usually smaller than tripping over a sidewalk crack.
    #41
  2. shaddix

    shaddix Banned

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    This is what I like to hear
    #42
  3. Prettyboy

    Prettyboy BFLB

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    I've got some reflective tape coming in the mail. Ought to make me a little more visible without the stupid skulls and tattoo patterns that all the colored helmets at the store seemed to have.
    #43
  4. manfromthestix

    manfromthestix Lost in Space

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    Don't kid yourselves, you guys, people in cars don't see you even if you're wearing a high-viz Aerostitch jump suit with a matching helmet. That said, if you can catch even one person's eye it's worth the effort. Another good thing about visually toxic colors in MC gear is that last year's unsold/un-saleable gear usually goes for pretty decent prices on the 'net, so you can find some real deals. I don't really care what it looks like, I can't see it from the inside, but my wife has a different opinion since she gets to stare at the back of it as we ride :D. BTW, She put the nix on a high-viz jacket I had my eye on last year because she thought she'd go blind looking at it from the pillion seat.

    That's a drag, one reason we love living in the country is we don't feel we have to lock everything down all the time. We have two great watchdogs, too, though! I don't own bikes anyone would want to steal, either.

    It helps, I think. Some dark evening you should turn the bike on and set your helmet etc. on the seat, park a car about 25 feet behind it with the lights on, and take a walk around the bike to get a feel for what a driver coming up behind you would see. I've got high-intensity LED driving lights mounted low on my front forks plus HID headlights, so I think I'm very visible from the front, but without auxiliary lighting on the rear all you've got is some reflectors and a teeny brake light. You are really invisible from the side. I've seen some small arrays (like four or five lights) of yellow-orange LEDs that aren't real bright but flicker randomly, mounted on the license plate bracket or sides of the front forks, that really catch your eye. Been wondering about getting some of those. A friend has some, I'll ask about them and post a link here.

    3M makes reflective tape in many different colors but that reflects BRIGHT WHITE. I've had that stuff pasted on the black saddlebags of two BMWs I've owned and it's really cool. During the day it's invisible, just looks black like the thing it's pasted to, but at night it's brilliant white reflective. It's visible in daylight too when the sun angle is right, but at night it's amazing. They also sell stuff called SOLAS (safety of life at sea) that is the most reflective stuff known because the open ocean is a big empty place and that stuff shows up like a beacon even in a faint light. I got the stuff through the Aerostitch on-line catalog years ago, but I'm sure it's available elsewhere if you search.

    Being conspicuous helps, but really it's defensive driving and situational awareness that will keep you out of trouble more than anything.

    I hope you're enjoying your new passion!

    Doug
    #44
  5. manfromthestix

    manfromthestix Lost in Space

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    my friend sent me the link to his cool "conspicuity" lights. I've seen them on the fronts and rears of bikes and they really do get your attention.

    http://www.skenedesign.com/lights/index.shtml

    Auxiliary lighting is pricey, no doubt, but I think it really helps (more than high-viz clothing or helmets) and is probably cheaper than the deductible for a single trip to the emergency room. It all helps. The good thing about LEDs is that even a small bike like the TU produces enough juice to power them.

    Doug
    #45
  6. DesertTortoise

    DesertTortoise Freedom Fighter

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2010
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    153
    Doing good taking the course, getting a small bike first, and getting the right gear

    Keep practicing in parking lots, low speed maneuvers, turns, figure 8, turn from a stop, hard braking, etc. all the skills you went over in the course. Do the same periodically and when you eventually get a new bike. :thumb

    Ride the wheels off that bike and Have fun!


    BTW, I didn't crash in the MSF class but I also didn't make it through the first exercise because I couldn't figure out how the clutch + throttle worked together. Was sentenced to two days on the simulator and then came back and took it.
    #46
  7. KodiakRS

    KodiakRS Adventurer

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    Jan 6, 2010
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    66
    I didn't drop my bike in the MSF class. I didn't drop the first bike I owned either. In fact, I made it 20K+ miles and thought I was invincible, right up until the point I low sided on some gravel* at 50MPH. 2 days later I was riding with a friend of mine who had been riding 30+ years without an accident when he turned in his "Never crashed" card for an involuntary helicopter ride.

    Dropping or crashing isn't inevitable, but just because you've been riding a long time doesn't mean it's your day to join the ranks of those who have.



    *There may have been some rider error involved but gravel is my excuse and I'm sticking to it.
    #47
  8. jimhaleyscomet

    jimhaleyscomet Adventurer

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    Jul 5, 2009
    Oddometer:
    96
    Cycle Gear is a good place to get some gear for not a ton (if it is on sale) especially boots. They often have a BILT combo on sale. Wish I found them sooner as they are not too far from my house.

    For pants Competition Accessories online sells some nice armored Kaki's and Jeans. Might want to check them out.

    You have started pretty well (on a smaller bike). I think you have a full face helmet so that is good. Consider the book Proficient Motorcycling by David Hough (and every other safety book out there). Keep learning!
    #48
  9. viverrid

    viverrid not dead yet

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2004
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    I have not (yet) crashed on pavement and I've had my M license since 1972. Recently my KTM did fall over in a parking lot as I dismounted because the sidestand wasn't down all the way, but that's not a crash. However I've crashed maybe, oh, 1,000 times in the dirt, It's a sport like skiing, if you do it aggressively, sometimes you fall.

    OTOH my wife didn't drop in MSF, but has had several low speed dumps (slow but not stationary tip overs) in probably less than 1,000 miles. On this last Friday, we were each on our own dualsport, on pavement, and we turned a sharp paved corner into the driveway for a park. The driveway was steeply uphill from the main road, she went into it coasting in third with the clutch pulled in, then couldn't make enough power to gas it up the hill which caught her by surprise, lost momentum and hopped off the bike before it hit the ground. MSF doesn't have steep hills on the range.

    In addition to the one replacement front brake lever, I've ordered an extra lever for each side to keep in stock because I expect she'll do it again somewhere. We could use those big handguards on the range bike that OP posted a pic of! BUT: she's never gone down at any more than MSF range speed.
    #49
  10. TraumaQueen

    TraumaQueen WW( ;,; )D?

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2010
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    Location:
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    Hey,

    Don't forget that a lot of places offer a discount on gear, parts, services, and/or bikes if you show/fax them your MSF RiderCourse completion card -- including most insurance companies.


    Motorcyclecoolstuff.com
    800-547-4788
    Spring Grove, IL
    Motorcycle safety products, accessories, & parts. One-time 20% discount.

    Kisan Technologies
    888-464-5472
    Colorado Springs
    Safety products for all bikes: headlight & taillight modulators, tire pressure monitoring, turn signal canceler, battery chargers. 10% off any product.

    BikerHiway
    866-496-3184
    Online retailer of motorcycle safety products & accessories. Air horns, headlight modulators, LED accent lighting, etc. 10% off; enter code P120016G.

    Revzilla
    Riding gear, helmets, tires, and accessories for all bikes, including H-Ds. 5% off first-time order. Place order by phone for discount.

    Rider WearHouse (Aerostitch)
    800-222-1994
    Duluth, MN
    Protective gear; accessories, clothing, tools. 10% off.

    Streetglo Reflective Decals
    Reflective motorcycle decals, custom reflective decals, reflective tape, reflective helmet stickers, custom motorcycle graphics. 15% off.

    Suzuki
    Complete a RiderCourse within 6 months (before or after) of purchasing any new Suzuki scooter, street bike, or dual sport motorcycle (regardless of model year) and receive a $100 check.

    Triumph
    Complete a RiderCourse within 6 months (before or after) of purchasing any new Triumph motorcycle and receive tuition reimbursement of up to $225 (gift card).

    Honda Riders Club of America (HRCA)
    Members receive up to a $75 reimbursement for an MSF- accredited riding course completed within 1 year of purchasing a new, on-road motorcycle.

    Motorcycle Sport Touring Association (MSTA)
    Members are eligible for up to 50% reimbursement ($100 maximum) for approved rider training courses & safety apparel.


    Other Stuff

    Reliable gear reviews:
    WebBikeWorld
    Revzilla
    RiderMagazine

    Good safety info
    Motorcycle-USA
    Be sure to visit “FAQ's and stuff you didn't know you didn't
    #50
  11. Seth650

    Seth650 Been here awhile

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    MSF BRC definitely omits field instruction on hills: In a nutshell, an aggressive approach is needed in steep drops, including downshifting to a safe coasting speed right before (but not too low a gear that you need to roll throttle in the downhill), standing on the pegs slightly off the seat while still straddling the gas tank (a confidence builder, your notice less relative steepness as you are now looking down on it), avoiding the front brake and only feathering the rear brake, as well as looking through.

    And MSF omits gravel and rutted 4x4 road treatment: No death grips! The front wheel needs to deflect a little in pots or ruts. Don't slow down too much beforehand or the deflection becomes a tuck, from the momentum loss! Death grips force the whole bike to comply with the deflection, so you'll slide! Don't fixate on road crap - it's all crap, so go like 15-20mph. As we saw, don't go into untested puddles unless you know how deep the water is, or what's in it. As we read, watch for innocous branches that turn into spears if you leg hits them at just the wrong angle. If you get stuck in a rain groove that drains into the woods..well cross rain grooves sharply before that happens, or you may need to shift to N, put some feet down, and walk it out..so what! You go where you look, so look across the groove even if just 20 feet ahead (try it on a bicycle). Practice swerves (mild at first) to know how the bike responds before you come across the unexpected. I keep the Trailwings at 16 psi frt, 18-20 psi rr. on or off road, but that's me.
    #51
  12. BCKRider

    BCKRider Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2012
    Oddometer:
    120
    Just wanted to point out to Yeps, the OP, (and anyone else interested) that most of us more experienced riders - including the ones "crash free" on roads - have gained a lot of experience in "dropping bikes" at 0 - 2 mph.

    I wrote an article for the BMW MOA Owner News on this topic after getting tired of my own stupidity, relating it, and hearing from much more experienced riders how they had done the same and other stupid things. So, If you would like to learn from OUR experience rather than first hand, google "bmw moa forum don't drop the bike." The first option you find takes you there.

    You don't have to ride a BWM (these dumb stunts cut across all brands) or be member of the organization to have a look and reply here.

    Perhaps some more experienced folk on this site, if they think the info worthy of a wider circulation, could tell me exactly how to do that.
    #52
  13. BCKRider

    BCKRider Been here awhile

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    Dec 24, 2012
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    All above is good, but to get to the final article as published and avoid a lot of BS, scroll down to post #44. And I'm very sorry about that weird stuff the MOA's new program inserted in place of comma's and quotation marks. That certainly makes it harder to read.

    Comments and advice, if you think this deserves a wider audience on this forum, are most welcome.
    #53
  14. GPrairie_Rider

    GPrairie_Rider Dirt Junkie

    Joined:
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    DFW
    When I took my MSF course, a couple of students dropped their bikes, hell one Whiskey Throttled a Knighthawk 250. Anyway, the coaches had to fill out all sorts of paperwork.

    Welcome to Motorcycling! It's an addiction now that never ends!
    #54
  15. Seth650

    Seth650 Been here awhile

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    I ease up the throttle when the rear tire starts sliding on gravel. I've read face plants of people who rolled on and had bad drops. So keeping steady speed (except in slides), rolling on throttle where needed, might be best when offroad for novices.
    As for right-angle turns into driveways or narrow roads, it's still go-where-you-look for me.. I find a little spot about 10 feet into the turned-in road (on the side facing me) when about 20-25 feet from the turn-in, and fixate on it for a couple of seconds, while I complete the turn. before entry into it I carefully downshift into 1st, and ride clutch until straight up. But if I lose mo, I pull in clutch and roll on throttle, then lurch when releasing clutch as a bit of a reminder to myself that I mess up a bit.
    #55
  16. LUCKY7

    LUCKY7 n00b

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    Sunglasses
    #56
  17. TheBlurr

    TheBlurr Banned

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    Montana
    Long as your wingtips come up well over your ankle you have boots providing decent protection, that is probably the main thing in that area.
    Laces of course can get caught, I had the edge of my hiking boots catch on the rear sets of my zx6r doing a slow turn once in mud, unable to put out my foot I fell over grrr, so riding boots eliminate that.
    You will not notice much different in many riding boots in the bulk area, avoid a full on race type boot unless you really need them and are planning to do some track riding (which I highly recommend)
    I do have a set of Sidi Vertigo Corsa that provide excellent protection and feel like a slipper, not all are like that so try on before you buy and understand they will be stiff, again, not necessary but more protection is also a good thing.

    Good luck and get a full face helmet, something like 40 percent of accidents end up being a face plant.

    Edit: Oh yea, I ate it at an advanced riding clinic, was 34 degrees and I was riding in the advanced group and was more of a medium level track rider, lost the front, only half an hour before the instructor had stated he never had anyone wreck, being a personal friend I was humiliated :D but shit happens, he was cool with it. Despite great racing level gloves I still had to have my thumb put back together again.

    Oh yea and forget about trail braking, it is the cause of many racers actually wrecking as well, no real place for it on the street, you can brake in a corner, do not be afraid of that and chances are you will not be going fast enough to really have a horrible effect, the best thing to do is to go for it, lean in, trust your tires and your bike, stay loose and odds are you will make it out. People get in trouble when they panic.
    #57