West America - Hand Made in America by Fellow Riders Camping Gear

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by Lost Rider, Dec 7, 2012.

  1. Lost Rider

    Lost Rider Roadie

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    First of, I have with zero affiliation with these guys besides a great deal of respect and being a happy customer.



    Time and time again folks around here bitch moan and complain about China Made stuff, myself included. "I wish I could buy USA Made stuff, but I can't" seems like a common statement these days.
    Well I stumbled across these guys a while back and after reading their story I really liked what they had going on. Riders with a great take on life living the dream, with obviously some excellent design and fabricating skills to compliment their attitudes.
    Great story, great products.
    I appreciate quality stuff and when possible buy the best gear I can, especially when it comes to MC camping gear as I use mine as much as possible and do wear things out. I'm on my 3rd or 4th cheap folding grill after them breaking from "normal" ADV use, that's what led me to find America West…
    I also like to support riders living the dream when I can.

    America West makes a few things I wanted to share here on ADV, thinking that there might a few folks around here that would appreciate some super high quality, hand made by riders in the USA, exceptionally designed camping/cooking gear.
    I have the W/A Camp Grill and a Utensil Set, both absolutely perfect for moto-camping as they were designed for, packing up very small, also being very functional, durable, easy to clean, and aesthetically pleasing.
    Yes, the grill is far more expensive than comparably cheaper products mass produced in some land far far away in sweat shops, sold by Corporations.
    When thinking about the price I look at it like I'm getting kick ass USA made gear I'll gets years and years of use from, along with supporting fellow riders to follow their dreams, earned with hard work and artistic talent. The value is in more than the sum of pieces of metal welded together, for me at least.

    Here's a few photos of the W/A Grill and utensils, and an interview with Jourdan from America West.




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    West America Interview on coolhunting.com
    by Graham Hiemstra in Travel on 10 August 2012

    Our interview with Jordan Hufnagel on building camping supplies and the story behind his new brand

    There comes a time in many peoples' lives when things just seem to be moving too fast, and there just aren't enough hours in the day to get it all done. This overwhelmed feeling spurred Portland-based bicycle builder Jordan Hufnagel and motorcycle maker James Crowe to start the adventure outfitter brand West America. A passion project for the two, West America makes handmade camping supplies and apparel capturing the free spirit that brought the brand to life.
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    While the product line itself is fairly basic, the story behind West America is a rich one filled with countless stories of friendship and travel with a genuine, pioneering spirit. To learn more about the young brand, we recently caught up with Hufnagel before his upcoming motorcycle trip for which the brand was formed.

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    What is West America all about?

    West America is about that constant evolution that we all go through, and being true to ourselves. It's about not being scared of the changes you want in your life and working hard to make them happen. A couple years ago James and I found ourselves buried in a mountain of work that only seemed to keep growing, while not getting us any closer to the lives we really wanted. After some big challenges were overcome and some rough conversations between the two of us, we committed to making those changes and somewhere along the line we thought up West America.


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    What does West America make?

    West America makes whatever James and I are stoked on at the time—currently that means a small line of camping gear, and paraphernalia—while simultaneously creating an outlet for James and me to document our work, good times and travels.

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    You make bicycles, James makes motorcycles. Who makes the camping gear?

    We both make the camping gear. James and I really yin each other's yang here in the shop, so working together designing and making things works out great.

    How did the idea for this specific camping gear (camp grill, skewer, utensil) come about?

    It all happens very naturally around here. Having a full metal shop, we have the privilege to make the things we want exactly how we want them. We are going to be on the road a long time, camping most of the nights. So we wanted gear that was going to pack easy in our limited space, but also create comfort. After bouncing around some ideas of what we wanted to make, we landed on these items to start.

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    Can you elaborate a little on the ongoing design process?

    At this point we're just scratching some sketches out as ideas pop in our heads and showing them to each other to get feedback and make refinements to the plan. Then one of us will make a prototype that we can beat up and get a feel for. Sometimes one prototype is all that happens and the product gets dumped. But, if we're happy with what we've come up with we'll make some final repeatable plans, order materials and will work together producing a limited run.

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    A foundation of the West America products seems to lie in the idea that they'll all be used on a future motorcycle trip, can you add anymore to this?

    We started planning this motorcycle trip to South America a couple years ago when we made that commitment to change and started thinking up West America. Like I said earlier, we had found ourselves buried in work. Me with bicycle orders and James with three different and very important full-time gigs. I was spending every waking hour at the shop and going a little crazy. I felt like I'd been stripped of the privilege to act on my spontaneous nature, and also had this huge drive to be doing more than one thing with my life. At the same time, James was being pulled in every direction too. Between our shop, a hot rod shop he worked at that was sponsoring his green card application, and having to be in school full time to maintain a visa here in the US (he's Canadian) he had no time to do anything besides work. Only sleeping a couple hours a night, things came to a tipping point.

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    At the time, I wanted to move away from Portland. The only thing keeping me here was sharing a shop with James. He's my best friend and ultimate shop partner. But life here was beating him down pretty hard and it looked like a move back to Canada was just around the corner, so I also felt like there was no reason to stay. It honestly was a pretty crazy emotional time. Then real late one night at the shop, we just broke it all down and committed to making this trip happen. Leaving all the stress behind and going off to have the awesome journey. You know, just hit the reset button and find out who we really are with out all the expectations and stress again. Now here we are a couple months from going. It's a crazy feeling, knowing that it's happening so soon.

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    You seem like a firm believer in the "journey-over-destination" idea, as a designer and builder how does this mindset fit in with West America?

    Totally. For the trip south our only plan is going, and letting the rest just take shape on its own. West America is the same. We just want it to be whatever we are into at that time, or whatever we want to make. Right now, it's camping and motorcycles. At some point we both want to build homes and I can totally see us making house wares as we want them, or bike stuff, or backpacking gear. You know, whatever is rocking us at the time. Also, I think it's important to keep in mind here that destinations are just a part of a journey, not the reason for them.

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    Can we expect to see more products added to the collection anytime soon?

    We have a few other things in the works, but we also have tons of work to finish up before we take off so we'll see what happens!

    Keep an eye on West America to stay up with the product development and the eventual documentation of Hufnagel and Crowe's South American adventure.



    http://wearewestamerica.com
    #1
  2. mrt10x

    mrt10x Dumba$s Jarhead

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    well thanks for that.. $95 poorer for a set of silverware :D I am such an easy touch for cool American made stuff.
    #2
  3. outdoornate65

    outdoornate65 Adventurer

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    Neat looking stuff....
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  4. Lost Rider

    Lost Rider Roadie

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    My pleasure. :evil
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  5. jbhawley

    jbhawley WTF- Gus?

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    I too try to by US made if at all possible. Not to criticize these guys or their business model, but gheesh, 140$ for a tiny grilling rack. However the utensil set does look appealing especially the way it stacks up together and it is priced reasonable. Now I know it takes some time and skill to fabricate by hand the little grill rack thus the cost is 99% labor...and the utensils are stamped from a template. But wow, 140$. just saying. I think I will order the utensil set just because i think its cool looking and very functional.

    I still have no clue to what a bicycle skewer is used for?
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  6. Speedo66

    Speedo66 Transient

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    Agreed. I also would like to buy American, and wouldn't mind paying 10-20% more to do it. But $140 for the tiny grill seems a bit much. Same for the utensils and skewers at $95. The utensils alone at $17 aren't too bad, beats eating off of questionable Chinese alloys, although you could probably buy a nice 5 piece place setting at that price. :lol3

    Also, what's up with all the T-shirts, hats, etc. for a company that makes 3 products? I saw something in the interview about bicycles, so maybe there's more to it.
    #6
  7. Xeraux

    Xeraux Archvillain

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    US$140.00 for that rack?


    :poser
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  8. cug

    cug --

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  9. SgtDuster

    SgtDuster Long timer

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    :photog
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  10. tlwood99

    tlwood99 Been here awhile

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    :viking
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  11. cug

    cug --

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    To be fair, the kit for $95 includes a pouch and skewers.

    Mine is probably more than 20 years old, I'm a bit unclear when I bought that, but it must have been late 80s or so:

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    These things are excellent. Just a little heavy. So getting just the silverware there is probably a good price for a good set of "table tools". The rest is above what I'd pay for this type of thing.
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  12. Lost Rider

    Lost Rider Roadie

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    I was wondering where those came from, they didn't say they made them and I didn't recognize the stamps on the utensils.
    Thanks for that info, makes a lot of sense. While slightly heavy they are very nice to eat with and pack well.




    Mobile ADV Fix Complete
    #12
  13. mrt10x

    mrt10x Dumba$s Jarhead

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    to be fair all I reall ordered was the silverware.. didnt need the pouch and I use a stick as a skewer all the time
    #13
  14. cug

    cug --

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    I'm not 100% certain whether the silverware was designed for the German military, all I can say is that this stuff has been around forever. Basically since I can remember going camping with school in the early eighties.

    It came in combination with a pot set:

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    All that stuff was really handy. It worked great. But they had to change it later as it contained some not too healthy metals that could flake into your food.
    #14
  15. Ceri JC

    Ceri JC UK GSer

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    +1. During my first forays into camping in the 80s, I'd say 60%+ of the kids in my scout troop had that style of metal cutlery. Great for "luxury camping" where all your kit goes on a lorry and you stay in one spot for 2 weeks. I personally wouldn't be prepared to go for the extra size/weight over my titanium spork when backpacking or a plastic spoon, coupled with my leatherman that I'm already carrying when on the bike.

    The grill looks a nice idea, but the price (I completely get the labour) seems incredibly high for what it is. I think if I was going to go for the "cooking on a grill" model of cooking and not carrying a collapsible stove that incorporated one, I'd go for a single piece grill (or an old oven shelf) attached to the outside* of my pannier to keep it separate from my kit. That said, if the price was right, I could imagine getting one of these for backpacking off the bike. Either way, the skewer looks pretty good and if that was available on its own for a few less $ I might go for it.

    Anyway, that's only for my personal kit preference. They come across as likeable guys and I wish them every success.

    *I'd clean it before use as opposed to after and the heat of the fire would sterilise it too.
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  16. cug

    cug --

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    I'm okay with the weight for motorcycling and backpacking in areas where I can easily get water. As soon as I have to carry lots of water on my back for survival, I drop pretty much every gram I can ... motorcycle - I still prefer the set as it doesn't matter that much that I have 200g vs. 20g spork. The added convenience and style is huge for me.
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  17. SgtDuster

    SgtDuster Long timer

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    Don't need a ~80$ skewer + canvas pouch myself...even if it's "proudly made in USA".

    No thanks.

    It's not because you can do it that you should do it. Labor, neat idea and pride as you want, these items are ridiculously expensives for what they are.

    What if I start to handmade some "proudly made in Canada" garbage bag ties out of a metal wire roll and autograph them using a tiny pen and a microscope and sell them 25$ each?
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  18. Xeraux

    Xeraux Archvillain

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    :lol3


    Yeah.

    I picked up a set of Brunton Titanium flatware for US$4.99 in a sale bin not too long ago. 1.7oz.


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  19. S/W

    S/W Been here awhile

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    You don't need a grill for steak, just skewer it with a sharpened stick and hang it over the fire. This saves you from the worst part of camp cooking, cleaning the grill!! and saves weight. If you read old camping manuals there are many ways to cook with out pots, pans,or grills. Of course, some people love to buy stuff and enjoy having lots of gear. Thats ok too.
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  20. Ceri JC

    Ceri JC UK GSer

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    Yes, I remember as a kid, my family building stoves out of stones on the beach, making a "hot plate" for the top by finding a flat stone, or better still, splitting a stone in half (the middle of a rock that hasn't seen the air for millions of years is pretty hygenic, even before the heat!) Once you're done with it, you can kick the stove over and the fire/ash is covered up (looks nicer and less likely for anyone to come along and burn themselves on it). You can cook sausages, bacon, steak, etc. on top really easily. Tried frying eggs once and it sort of worked, but it's messy. I think it's great to be able to do all that stuff and fun to learn.
    #20