What am I doing wrong??

Discussion in 'Face Plant' started by ItalianRider, Nov 19, 2012.

  1. 390beretta

    390beretta Long timer

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    What Pantah said. It sounds to me that you're riding waaay over your skill level and doing "crazy shit" will eventually catch up with you. Don't mean this as a put down. Good luck!
    #21
  2. siclmn

    siclmn Adventurer

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    When I ride in the wet, I pretend it's ice. I just don't ever want to go down on my 620 lb bike. That is called respect. Don't get me wrong, in the dry it's a whole other story. But in the wet I respect it.
    #22
  3. ItalianRider

    ItalianRider Adventurer

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    Not a put down ... that's what I feel like right now. A beginner.

    It seems that if you switch types of bikes (not just models ... but TYPES), you become a beginner all over again.
    #23
  4. ItalianRider

    ItalianRider Adventurer

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    I slept over it ...

    I am 99% convinced that there's nothing wrong with the bike and it's my fault at this point ... so any tips or pointers anyone can offer ... I'll take it.

    It wasn't by accident that I chose this bike. I wanted an adventure bike ... because I wanted to go on adventure rides. I did take this bike gingerly over unpaved roads and incredibly the bike feels "better" than on roads. It might just all be in my head.

    I MUST learn how to ride this bike safely.

    Even if it means that I need to admit that I don't know squat and I have to re-learn everything.

    I'll start by amputating my ego and my pride.

    ... done.

    I don't know $hit.

    Let's re-start from there.

    PS: the 1% is that I rode the bike to work this morning and tried to keep the RPMs higher ... and made a conscious effort to keep the engine in the right place so it wouldn't stall. The bike still stalled. It happened in stop and go traffic, while upright, so no harm done. But this has been happening way often than it's normal for me. I never had this problem with any other bike I owned (Ninja 250, Versys and Speed Triple). I am not an experienced rider by any stretch of the imagination but I should be able to handle the clutch after 10,000+ miles this year, and 3 different bikes in the last couple of years ... shouldn't I? I'm thinking that the engine stalling problem might be something "extra" ...
    #24
  5. Aussijussi

    Aussijussi Long timer

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    Your coordination and balance don't seem to agree with the controls of the bike. Blaming the bike is just nonsense. Might be 205, but i would suggest, get on a dirt bike, 200 will do, and get yourself sorted out on that. Moto gp riders practice riding moto cross, some like Hayden do supermoto, Mika Kallio does ice racing. When you learn to ride on dirt, the tight stuff especially, it teaches you to be be sharp with the controls. I know there are people that reckon it makes no difference what you start on, be it street or a dirt bike. I know it has saved me countless times, having the skill's i learned on dirt.
    Without trying to give you hard time, you're not riding just because your mate's ride? I still think after 50 some years of riding, that motorcycle's are not dangerous. I also think there are lot of people out there riding that shouldn't be, those video's on ' Dragon' are a good example. I hope you'll find an answer to your predicament, riding a motorcycle is a lifestyle, not a hobby!
    Good luck with it mate!
    #25
  6. Arrowhead300

    Arrowhead300 Adventurer

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    Your experiance is another good reason it's not a great idea to let someone "try out" your adventure bike. Just because they ride doesn't mean they won't drop yours.
    #26
  7. BikePilot

    BikePilot Long timer

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    Maybe something's wrong with the bike, it shouldn't stall that easily.

    I agree that learning to ride a dirt bike well would do wonders for your riding generally and will be especially applicable to dual-sport-ish bikes on and off road. Really not that expensive, huge fun and definitely worth doing. Go buy a KDX200 or something and run a harescrambles series for a year. By the end of it you'll be a more capable rider than probably 98% of the folks out there on adv-styled bikes.

    The F bike won't have the grip your S3 had, probably explains the low side.

    To keep from falling when/if you stall in a turn grab the clutch real quick and tight up the turn enough to make the bike straight before you loose all momentum.

    Maybe re-take a couple of those classes on the F bike. That's probably the biggest thing--you got really comfortable on the S3 and did all the training on it and aren't that acclimated to the F bike.
    #27
  8. holckster

    holckster dougholck

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    Concentrate on LOOKING where you want to go.
    Critical at any speed, especially slow speed.
    Look down and that is where you will go.
    #28
  9. BingoRyder

    BingoRyder Been here awhile

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    You are getting to close to the ground

    :rofl:rofl:rofl:rofl:rofl:rofl:rofl:rofl:rofl:rofl
    #29
  10. Treedguy

    Treedguy Long timer

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    This.

    Also have you adjusted the suspension?
    #30
  11. Pantah

    Pantah Red Sox Nation

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    The comment about learning off road skills on a small motorcycle is probably the best advice so far. Nothing teaches technique faster than riding lightweight machines on low traction surfaces. But that might not be practical.

    You just need lots more seat time. The stalling issue is a common problem and if you are on a tall motorcycle and it stalls at the wrong spot, you are likely to drop it. Particularly if it is a top heavy pig like the big adventure machines. Once those things start going down, it's pretty hard to pull them back up. I have dropped mine many times in very slow situations like parking lots or the intersection you discribed. I basically just step off rather than hurt myself trying to be a hero.

    Since yours stalls a lot, you must have some sort of mechanical problem. My KTM 690 can stall when plonking through rock gardens and such. Once I discovered that I began feathering the clutch when the going gets too slow. But it takes lots of experience to make good use of such simple techniques.

    Lowsiding on the tarmac is a serious error. Particularly if it is dry. You must not be very mindful of your grip limits. I hope you don't do that again.

    Anyway, keep plugging and don't think about so much. It's not that hard.
    #31
  12. hosertp

    hosertp Adnauseam Adventurer

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    It always takes me a year or so to get used to the manners of a new bike. Those two are truly different animals. Each ride you complete and keep it on two wheels will only increase your confidence. And, now you know two things that you can't do . . .
    Keep at it!
    Paul
    #32
  13. foxtrapper

    foxtrapper Been here awhile

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    OK, go take a motorcycle course with your bike. Matters little what one you take. You will be under an instructors supervision and will get critiqued on what you are doing with your bike and your controlling of it. You will learn a whole lot. Different courses will teach you different things of course, but they will all help you to better control your bike.

    If you can't find that, get with a friend who knows how to ride well and work with that friend on enhancing your skills. Have them watch you braking and turning and such.

    And then for yourself, go practice things. Every time you ride. Personally, I pick a subject for each ride, and work on it during each ride. What I work on varies with each ride and what I think I need to improve the most.
    #33
  14. Two Wheeled 'Tard

    Two Wheeled 'Tard Banned

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    I don't know if this has been mentioned, but perhaps you're used to the high-end suspension on the Speed Triple, and the F700s lower-rent stuff is why you say you can't really feel the bike? To my knowledge, the F700 has a damper rod front and a very basic rear shock with minimal adjust-ability.
    #34
  15. steve3b3

    steve3b3 Been here awhile

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    In the first crash, it sounds to me like you've got a handle on what you did wrong.
    My impression is that they were two dissimilar incidences.
    Question: in the second incident, is it possible that you were in a higher gear than was appropriate? I've stalled my bike at low speed when I was in third when I should have been in a lower gear, and I wonder if you just haven't developed a feel for the proper gear for the speed.

    I normally ride an ST1300, and bought a VStrom a year ago. I can't tell you the number of times I've stopped and not been in neutral or first gear when I attempted to start out again.

    All the best,
    Steve
    #35
  16. Pecha72

    Pecha72 Long timer

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    It's an entry-level bike, and though the components are without a doubt quite basic, they do not cause crashes in situations described, its more of a user error. But maybe the OP's bike also has some sort of fuelling issue, that contributes to stalling the engine.
    #36
  17. PeterW

    PeterW Long timer

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    First drop, most likely your 'problem' not used to the bike the handling or the level of grip.

    The stalling, not so sure that's a user problem.

    I had similar problems on my K6 DL when the idle speed crept down - tall top heavy pig, and when the engine cut, it just wanted to lie down. It also had budget level suspension, but not a lack of feel.

    However a modern bike stalling multiple times is unlikely to be a user problem, it's more likely either a setup or a design problem.

    Check the clutch adjustment, if possible up the idle speed, if you can't up it, bitch at the dealer and get it on record that the bike has a stalling problem.

    Pete
    #37
  18. Two Wheeled 'Tard

    Two Wheeled 'Tard Banned

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    You're probably right. But I was thinking it may contribute heavily to the OP saying he doesn't have any ability to "feel" the bike and what the bike is doing, especially compared to something with fairly good suspension like his previous Speed Triple. Lack of feel of the bike may have caused him to over-estimate the grip and traction, especially with likely very different tire profiles and compounds when compared to the Triumph.

    When I went from my SV650 with a GSX-R front end and a ZX-10 rear, to a V-Strom 650 with stock suspension, the difference was so astounded I almost found the V-Strom unrideable. It was so unpredictable and mushy when compared to my SV that I felt like I couldn't ever trust it. $2000 of suspension parts took care of it, but by the time I speced up the front end, rear shock, and brake calipers, I could probably have gotten a Tiger for the same money :\
    #38
  19. ItalianRider

    ItalianRider Adventurer

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    Add that to the fact that the engine seems to have a stalling issue and you pretty much nail how I feel ...

    I'm sure that a better rider/more experienced rider would be able to handle this bike safely. I'm sure that if I keep at it, practice some more, take more classes with the F700, I'll get a better handle on it.

    To fix this situation, the stalling engine issue needs to go away and I need to develop good habits and good muscle memory for riding this bike and rebuild confidence as well because right about now I feel none.
    #39
  20. Pecha72

    Pecha72 Long timer

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    That 700 can probably be lowered 1-1,5 inches quite easily, this usually helps a bit, if you're a little short for the bike (?) and have trouble holding it upright, when the engine stalls.

    Another small help with the feel could be switching to full-on street tyres. I put Michelin Pilot Road 3's on mine (not a Beemer, its a DL650, but wheel size should be the same) and I'd say this greatly improved handling on tarmac compared to the OEM tyres, that are known to suck. What tyres your 700 comes with, is unknown to me though..
    #40