What bike do you want today?

Discussion in 'Road Warriors' started by fivehitsweak, Jun 3, 2010.

  1. KungPaoDog

    KungPaoDog Been here awhile

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    I never noticed it before, but at this angle that R1 looks like a very surprised fish about to swallow the front wheel.
  2. thedrewski86

    thedrewski86 too few miles

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    So true!! :rofl

    Here is what I want ever since I saw a nice one on Craigslist two days ago:

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
  3. Cortez

    Cortez BAZINGA!

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    FFS.
    :lol3
  4. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    Man! I remember when I saw my first ever gen 1 GSXR. What was it? 1986 or so? Man, how I lusted after that bike! So, light and so bad-ass for its time! Or so I imagined, since I never owned or even rode one. :cry I'd still love to have a nice one just for the nostalgia of that period.
  5. mrbreeze

    mrbreeze Long timer

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    good post. It got me to thinking. I have been toying with the idea of selling my Nomad and getting something smaller, perhaps a DL650. I ran some numbers, and it looks like I could save over $1000 a year just on my expense for gas. But that assumes 50 weeks of commuting a year, which isn't realistic because the weather will not allow it. Still though, add back in all the pleasure riding I do, weekend rides, road trips, etc. and I am probably still somewhere close to $1000 saved just in gas. Then add in the lower cost of tires, and probably insurance...

    so what bike do I want today? The one I used to own... my old V-Strom. Most fun I ever had on two wheels.

    [​IMG]
  6. 100mpg

    100mpg Self Imposed Exile

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    forgot about this one...does it count since it has 3 wheels? It might be my next vehicle if it is available at the projected price.
    [​IMG]
  7. PeteN95

    PeteN95 Long timer

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    +1 And I would like a Tuono V4R also. It would be funny to have a "car" that gets twice the mileage of your bike!?! :lol3

  8. single

    single Been here awhile

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    Regarding why people care about MPG, I think especially in the motorcycle world people bring it up more as a function of range and convenience then as a function of cost savings. A low MPG motorcycle has smaller range, motorcycles tend to have small fuel tanks, and the ones with large tanks tend to be 800 pound behemoths. Having a high MPG means more time riding and more ability to enjoy the ride and getting lost, and less time worrying about where to find the next gas station.
  9. kraven

    kraven Hegelian Scum

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    [​IMG]

    One like this built from a Star Bolt.
  10. Cortez

    Cortez BAZINGA!

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  11. CharlesLathe

    CharlesLathe Been here awhile

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    There are certainly other motorcycles that interest me, but, all in, I still choose my Bonneville.

    [​IMG]

    Regards, Chuck
  12. 0ldhippie

    0ldhippie Been here awhile

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    The whole mileage thing is only part of the picture. If you are really concerned about economy, a motorcycle may not be the best choice when ya add in the added cost and frequency of tires, oil changes and other maintenance items. I had a 100 mile each way daily comute for a while and it was cheaper (but slower and less fun) to use my little 40mpg econo box than my near 50mph harley or especially my 35mpg ninja. Of course it may be different if ya can stand a Honda 50?
    That said, I am intrigued with the electric bikes from Zero and Brammo.
  13. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    Well, I've thought more about this and came to the conclusion that maybe it's just a completely different way of viewing motorcycles and what you want/need/use them for. I have a company vehicle along with a gas card. I've never used a motorcycle for commuting purposes, and wouldn't in the Atlanta interstate traffic even if I did need a personal vehicle for the purpose. I don't enjoy riding on the interstate in the least, and absolutely HATE the heavy traffic on my commute route since it's mostly people too busy texting, talking on their phones, or putting on makeup to bother with driving. :cry

    Motorcycles have for over 30 years simply been a hobby, a toy, the thing that I do for fun and pleasure. I've just never seen them as a practical "vehicle" or means of transport, outside of just for the shear joy of it. Since they are a "passion" item for me, the relatively small amount of money difference that fuel economy represents just isn't important to me in the least. I buy motorcycles based entirely on the things they DO for me in terms of the sensations and pleasurable experiences they provide. Unfortunately, these days, with my schedule and other commitments I fall well below that 10,000 mile per year average I used in my earlier example, so the paltry amount of money potentially saved really has no meaning to me whatsoever. I mean hell, the bag of beef jerky I ate yesterday would probably pay for the difference in fuel between my Sporty and the average touring scooter for a week or two. :D

    Now, if I were using a bike for daily transportation, and we were talking about a SIGNIFICANT money difference... like say maybe even $75 to $100 a week, then yeah, maybe so. But, using my example above and for the average commuter, we're really not talking about a lot of money saved between what, for me, would be a fun bike and a boring appliance.

    That's just the way I look at it personally, but I realize that different people have different priorities and "hot buttons".

    To each their own....


    :1drink
  14. single

    single Been here awhile

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    I think your math might be a little off.

    Considering 10,000 mile commuting distances a year.

    65 MPG:

    10,000 miles / 65 mpg = 154 gallons of gas
    154 gallons * 4 dollars a gallon = 616$ a year on gas

    35 MPG:

    10,000 miles / 35 mpg = 286 gallons of gas
    286 gallons * 4 dollars a gallon = 1144$ a year on gas

    That's 10$ a week MORE and half a grand a year just on gas. That's not an insignificant sum for many people.

    Not to mention that kind of coin can buy some really soul stirring weekend getaways spent on your motorcycle throughout the year instead of buying some boring gas.

    There are some out there who see any motorcycle as a ticket to fun and excitement. Personally I don't see how anyone can consider any motorcycle to simply be an "appliance". That to me speaks to an obsession with the machine rather then the act of riding. Riding is the fun part, and I can have fun on anything with two wheels.

    If I can save 500 a year doing what I love - sounds like a good deal to me.
  15. opmike

    opmike Choosing to be here.

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    Owing an SV is a major pain in the ass if you have a wandering eye. Of all the bikes I've owned, it's the one I'm having the hardest time justifying trying to sell off. I have the suspension fully sorted front and rear, upgraded calipers (off a RC51), and a master cylinder (off an '09 R1) so now it stops and handles as well as anything I've ridden. All for a total investment of around 4 grand at this point not including consumables and basic maintenance. And if I sell it, I'll get what, 3K on a good day?

    I've been looking long and hard at Striple R's these past few weeks but can't really convince myself of why the hell I should be jumping ship.
  16. travelR6

    travelR6 Been here awhile

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    just looking at it makes me moist :evil


    [​IMG]
  17. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    Nothing wrong with my math. I used slightly different mpg differences than you and gas is under $3.50 a gallon here currently, so in my example it works out to be less than $10 a week, which to me is insignificant. And that's still using the 10,000 miles a year figure, and like I said I don't even ride that much so the total saved for ME would be even less. And yes, the money saved can be used anyway you see fit. Like on a little more beef jerky... :D

    And for me, a "soul stirring (bike) weekend" requires a "soul stirring" bike. And again for ME, the bikes that typically get 65-70 mpg just don't fit that definition. My Sporty actually does do that and still gets right at 50 mpg. My GS, while bordering on boring, does handle well, has ample power, has tons of storage capacity, and is comfortable for two up travel way up in the hundreds of miles per day. It also gets in the upper 40's in the mpg dept. So why would I want to give up what I find soul stirring for something I find boring or less competent for my wants and needs, just to save a few dollars on the one thing in life that I really don't mind spending my disposable income on?

    I mean, does anyone NEED to play golf? If they do, do they really need to spend the money on premium balls and equipment? What about fishermen? Do they really need that huge bass boat with all the fancy equipment, and thousands of dollars in tackle and gear? No. A golfer can use pawn shop clubs and range pick-up balls. A fisherman can use a canoe or an aluminum jon boat and one or two rods. We use our disposable income on things that we enjoy doing, on things that make us smile, on things that are usually pointless in the real world, but are our passion. I don't do those things, but I DO ride motorcycles and I don't see the point in diminishing the total amount of pleasure that I can obtain just to save a few paltry dollars that really doesn't amount to a hill of beans in the greater scheme of my income and expenses. It's a luxury item, not a necessity.

    And yes, given no choice of bikes to ride, I'd say that I could find pleasure riding anything as opposed to riding nothing. But, given a choice, that doesn't mean that I can't derive MORE pleasure from riding some as opposed to others. Luckily I have that choice. We all do, and we all have to make those choices based on our own set of priorities.

    It's not like I haven't owned and ridden boring bikes. It's just that over the years I've discovered that I enjoy riding bikes that I don't find boring more than I enjoy riding those that I do. Given the exact same road and trip I just find it more satisfying and joyful to ride some bikes as opposed to some others. It's really simple. Not an obsession with the "bike" so much as it is an obsession with the totality of the bike experience. And yes, some bikes are more like appliances, IMO. That term simply means that they are very competent at doing their job, but are lacking in the all important "soul stirring" element for ME, in some way or area or another. Much like my dishwasher. It washes dishes great! But, it doesn't excite me when it does its job.

    But once again, I don't expect everyone to understand that any more than I understand how anyone could choose what I would consider a boring bike. :thumb

    There really are differences in people, ya know? Some people really enjoy food more than others, for a simple example. Some people feel music and some people simply hear it. Human perception is a very interesting subject and the way we vary in the way we internally experience what outwardly appears to be the same stimuli can be quite a surprise for some people. Many people are egocentric enough to actually believe that their way of perceiving and experiencing the world is the ONLY way. I've lived with that my whole life as I tend to be of a more sensual nature. And while I don't expect others to understand it, I wouldn't trade it for the world, because I feel that my life is far richer as a result. That's undoubtedly why I experience some bikes as having "character" or "soul" and others as appliances. Some people share in that interpretation and others don't. It's all about perception. Do you really believe that your view is the only one?

    Different strokes for different folks. It REALLY is as simple as that. You have fun with your extra $10 a week your way, and I'll have fun with my extra $10 a week in my way, by riding a bike that I like and not worrying about a few extra gallons of gas. :clap And if I really have to, I'll skip that beef jerky next week. :lol3



    :1drink
  18. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    Ummm.... If your talk yourself into the Striple, gimme a shout about the SV. :D
  19. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    WOW! :thumb

    Details????
  20. PhilB

    PhilB Long timer

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    I am in both parts -- I ride daily and have done for many years, but I also love to ride and travel, and do it all on the bike that stirs my soul -- a Ducati Monster. While commuting isn't a lot of fun, I found it VERY practical. I was in a pretty ideal situation for it -- in SoCal, the weather's always good and the traffic's always bad. I could go without a car at all (and have since 1988) so the bike really did save money. Also, In CA (and in most other countries) you can split lanes, and the time saved doing that can be a huge benefit. I was a consultant there for 11 years, and the time saved in traffic translated directly to more billable hours at clients, so even if the bike didn't save money on running costs, it made me an extra $40K in income over that time.

    The Ducati isn't the cheapest choice for running, but it's been pretty reasonable. Counting everything -- purchase, depreciation, upkeep, maintenance, gas, tires, insurance, everything, I was at about 15 cents a mile up to about 180K miles. In the last few years, I have put a fair bit of money into it, because I love the bike, so I'm probably closer to 20 cents a mile now, but that's still not terribly expensive. There are cars you can run for less than that, but not many, and not any you'd want to spend much time in. Any decent car will run you more than that to operate.

    PhilB