What do you carry in your tool kit

Discussion in 'Australia' started by Scottyx, Sep 7, 2017.

  1. Scottyx

    Scottyx Adventurer

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    Aug 31, 2017
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    G'day my names Scott, how's it going?

    I'm just getting into ridding in the bush (still waiting for my bike) and I'm wondering what you carry in your tool kit.

    I can probably work out a tool kit, but I would like to hear what dudes carry who have been doing this for a while.

    Thanks for your time.
    Scott
    #1
  2. Scrubmonkey

    Scrubmonkey Been here awhile

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    Australia, QLD
    Dont usually have the helicoil kits with me but it was a big trip. But all that stays in that red bag thats bolted to the back. Have front a rear tubes in a fender bag with the tyre levers

    received_1121768064622472.jpeg received_1121768077955804.jpeg
    #2
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  3. stujamur

    stujamur keep rollin rollin rollin

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    #3
  4. phreakingeek

    phreakingeek adventurer

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    Oddometer:
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    Location:
    VA
    well, hard to beat Scubmonkey's tool kit, I bet he could strip his bike to the frame, split the case, and rebuild it.

    My set includes:
    stubby 3/8 ratchet
    3/8 4" extension
    8, 10, 12, and 14mm sockets
    8, 10, 12, and 14mm wrenches, plus 17 and 22mm axle wrenches
    Sparkplug wrench
    Chapman screwdriver set with Allen bits
    Pliers with wire cutter
    tire irons
    air pump
    Voltmeter
    fuses
    Zipties
    Stainless steel safety wire
    electrical tape
    duct tape
    Quicksteel
    JB Weld
    tire/tube patches and glue
    Some random spare nuts, bolts, screws


    On my long trip I added some additional spare parts that I thought might be hard to come by.
    #4
  5. Scottyx

    Scottyx Adventurer

    Joined:
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    Oddometer:
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    Location:
    Sydney
    Chain link is excellent idea. This would have saved me hitch hiking to Cooma and renting a car to get to Sydney. Still don't have one in my road bike kit.
    Also tow rope is excellent. Did you use a proper tow rope or something like a boat trailer winch rope.
    Thanks mate
    #5
  6. fayeslane

    fayeslane Rankest of amateurs

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Albury, NSW
    Dyneema rope is very strong in relation to its diameter, 3mm rope has an 1100 kg breaking strain. Also useful for other stuff eg. attaching your tarp :evil

    Double side Velcro tape also has a multitude of uses.

    Race tape = essential.
    #6
  7. adv.deviants

    adv.deviants Village Idiot in training

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2014
    Oddometer:
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    Location:
    Brisbane North
    Pretty much the same as the above gents (but I like the idea of that helicoil kit from above). Am yet to do any major long trips (longer than a week) but my kit remains the same even for short day rides (by personal preference and the way I pack). I have a reasonable length of 'Telstra rope' as my tow rope (interested in this Dyneema rope comment above too). The pic here is not just tools, includes first aid and the miscellaneous 'regular' bits - milk crate would be ideal but couldn't fit it in ;)

    tools.jpg
    #7
  8. Warin

    Warin Retired

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2012
    Oddometer:
    4,531
    Look in the bikes standard tool kit for spanner sizes.

    What tools do you need to;
    remove wheels?
    Fix a flat?
    Change oil and filters?
    Check for spark?
    Check ignition system?
    Check valves?

    Thoes tools should be in your tool kit, and use them to do your standard services.
    #8
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  9. Tkacsman

    Tkacsman Adventurer

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    Oct 14, 2017
    Oddometer:
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    Location:
    Washington
    Here is what I carry

    #9
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  10. BergDonk

    BergDonk Old Enough to Know Better

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    Location:
    Snowy Mountains Oz
    I carry enough to keep me mobile, including diagnosis, which is normally used on the bikes owned by riders I travel with. Recently I sorted a dodgy chain setup with my Terra X breaker, a chain offcut, and a couple of master links on a mate's bike 1000 + kms from home.

    What tools do you need for routine maintenance, including tyre changing/flat fixing, and known possible failures of your bike, like a DR650's pickup coil? Spare parts like misc bolts, nuts, washers, etc.

    I almost never use my tools on my bike, but sometimes it happens, like when I got a dodgy fuel fill in Laver's Hill recently and flushed the carb and filter to sort it.
    #10
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  11. 18415

    18415 Adventurer

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    Jan 7, 2018
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    Danville Ca.
    I love your videos! I actually re-visited my tool bag after this video and ended up saving some weight. Keep up the awesome vids!
    #11
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  12. AUSSIEADV

    AUSSIEADV Long timer

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    Location:
    Ned and Wild's fight site
    The usual spanners etc.

    Leatherman
    Valve tool
    Sealmate for wiping out your fork seals taped to the front fender.
    Cable ties.
    Cloth tape that is taped to the bike.
    Tie wire wound around wherever.
    Electrical tape.
    Loktite.
    2 part epoxy
    Tyre valves, nuts and bolts.

    Alot of gear you can tape, wire, cable tie to the bike.
    Grind shifters and the like into a tyre lever at the handle. It reduces tyre levers by one. Double ended screw drivers etc.

    Ill add to this later as im getting the shove along at the Eldy pub.
    #12
  13. bigborett

    bigborett Long timer

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    Location:
    Narre Warren Victoria
    Amazing how alike our selection is.

    Only carry 19" tubes, they can be pushed into service on either end.
    Those alloy tyre levers are great too, weigh nothing and don't trash your rims.
    #13
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  14. darren70

    darren70 I don't own a KTM

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    Tis is what i need to carry to keep my wr running.
    [​IMG]

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    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    #14
  15. LivingdeadCamo

    LivingdeadCamo Been here awhile

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    686
    Location:
    Woongarrah, NSW, Australia.
    Gotta be a lot lighter than the kit needed for the last bike
    #15
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  16. darren70

    darren70 I don't own a KTM

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    yeah pretty well, but i stay on this side of the ranges too
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  17. 0405canvet

    0405canvet Been here awhile

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    Maybe a discussion of what each person has actually needed would save a lot of excess baggage. I have ridden for over 40 yrs, same as a number of others around here. If I think back to what I have actually needed then my ' must have ' list would be considerable less. Maybe we carry enough to be comfortable about possible problems to the point of carrying WAY too much!!??
    #17
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  18. hoorang

    hoorang Rather be riding than working

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    Feb 16, 2015
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    783
    Location:
    Curlewis NSW
    I always end up with a good 5kg of tools and spares on my longer rides and have never been stranded nor needed any more than a chain breaker for myself. My tools have gotten a few other bikes out of strife which is as much of a holdup on a ride.

    I work on my own bikes, know what every tool required does and wouldn't be comfortable without them - the old "first one to be thrown out is the next one you'll need" scenario.

    I will say carrying a small multi meter is one of the most useful tools when electrics start playing up, that's as long as you know how to use it.
    #18
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  19. Mac Ka

    Mac Ka just a guy on a bike ..

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    Location:
    Mainland Europe
    a couple of 'hand' wipes in those free sachets from KFC and at least 1 pair of latex gloves......absolutely detest putting shitty hands inside my Gucci gloves after getting caught out on the trail.
    #19
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  20. farqhuar

    farqhuar Human guinea pig

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2008
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    2,092
    Location:
    Islands in the sun, Oztralia
    Over the past 45 years I have spent around 5 years on the road travelling internationally.

    I never carry a lot of tools, but in 1978 I lost most of my toolkit in a river crossing in north east Kenya that was a lot deeper than I expected.

    The only tools I had remaining were a 5mm hex wrench (which fitted the engine case bolts), a spark plug spanner (19mm one end and 13mm the other), a pair of bike pliers (the ones that come standard in a bike toolkit and provide two jaw spacings), a reversible bike screwdriver(+ one end and - the other), a bike 10mm/8mm open ended spanner and an adjustable wrench.

    Around 5 days after the river crossing the piston skirts (in the area of the intake port cutouts) on my RD350 disintegrated in the main street of Nairobi - a result of ingestion of water. I pushed the bike the 2km back to my $2 per night hotel, pulled the motor out of the frame and then carried it up the 4 flights of stairs to my room so I could start the dissection.

    I tore the motor down to the point of separating the cases before I realised I didn't have a tool big enough to fit the nut holding the clutch basket on to the end of the secondary gear shaft (it was necessary to remove the clutch basket because Yamaha, in its infinite wisdom, had placed a circular strap around the secondary shaft and bolted it to both the top and bottom case).

    I called up the local Yamaha distibutor who confirmed they could supply oversize pistons and rings and also had a 32mm (to the best of my memory) socket to fit the clutch retaining bolt.

    Two hours local bus ride through the back streets of Nairobi and I was on the distributor's doorstep, we put the motor on their work bench, undid the bolt, split the cases, flushed the big ends and confirmed that the detritus from the piston skirts had not done too much damage. I handed over my barrels and they were bored/honed to fit the new pistons/rings.

    I then took the old and new bits back to my hotel for reassembly. The bike was still running on the same pistons and bottom end 39 years later when I sold the RD 6 months ago.

    Yes, I know it was a 2 stroke, and relatively easy to work on, but I have also torn down motors of other bikes (4 strokes) in places like Brazil and Kazakhstan over the years, all using pretty much the standard tool kit provided by the bike manufacturer.

    Extra tools?? Nice to have, but in my experience not worth the weight of carrying anything much beyond the standard toolkit, wheel removal sockets/spanners and a puncture repair kit.
    #20
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