What do you cook/eat when camping?

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by tafflink, Dec 3, 2007.

  1. tafflink

    tafflink Vicarious Adventurer

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    I'm looking for guidance.
    Thanks.
    #1
  2. justJeff

    justJeff Banned

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    The length of trip and ease of reprovisioning always dictates this for me. If it will be easy to resupply along the way I tend to eat more fresh stuff. If the trip is more remote and harder to resupply I take dehyrated meals like those from Mountainhouse, Backpackers Pantry, etc.

    I enjoy the convenience of the dehydrated meals as I can just boil water, pour some in the pouch, seal it, wait, and then eat a hot meal. There are some that I like pretty well, and others that I don't really care for. Personaly, I like the chilimac from Mountainhouse pretty well, it's tasty, and hearty. If all I have to worry about is boiling water all I take along are my pocket rocket stove, and a stainless cup. I use the stainless cup for boiling water for meals, as well as for having oatmeal in the morning, and for coffee and tea. It makes for a pretty compact, light cooking kit.

    Of course things change if you can resupply every couple of days. Add a small pot and frying pan to the above kit and you can be enjoying stew (either home made or canned), bacon, eggs, etc. If you use the search function you'll find some meals that folks on here have prepared that are pretty spectacular looking.
    #2
  3. Bronco638

    Bronco638 Nobody Home

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    I suppose it depends on what you're carrying and how close to a grocery store you are. If I have a cooler and access to a mega-mart, I like to grab some of those frozen cornish game hens. Since they're frozen like a brick, they take all day to thaw (in the cooler). But, they're small, taste great and are easy to cook over a small fire or stove. If you're travelling more lightly, then dehydrated is they way to go.
    #3
  4. Stromdog

    Stromdog Howl at the Moon

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    +1 on the Mountainhouse Chili Mac. Sometimes I pack along Ramen noodles and Hormel Chili or Dinty Moore Beef Stew. Heat the stuff up right in the can and pour it over the cooked, Ramen noodles. Oreo or Chips Ahoy cookies for desert. Ain't nothin better than camp chow after a good day of riding, except maybe a little JD around the fire later. :D
    #4
  5. Gillies

    Gillies Been here awhile

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    Cigarettes and Tic Tacs. :lol3
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  6. anonny

    anonny What could go wrong?

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    you forgot coffee!
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  7. GS N RVN

    GS N RVN Been here awhile

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    last trip we ate:


    Crab cakes, pork tenderloin, rib eye steaks, pasta and sausage, grilled tuna ........and a bottle of KNOB CREEK. All cooked by us at the camp site.
    #7
  8. swjohnsey

    swjohnsey Banned

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    How cheap are you? Things that are easy to cook on the road, require no refrigeration and available from grocery stores:

    Ramen
    Coffee
    Spam
    Canned chicken/turkey
    Oatmean the instant stuff or old fashoned stuff packed in sandwich bags.
    Macaroni and cheese
    Canned beef stew
    Canned chili
    Canned vegetables
    Peanut butter
    Raisins or other dried fruit
    Weight Watcher full meal bars

    A quick meal, package of Ramen, can of boned chicken, can of vegall, tobasco, salt and pepper to taste. Takes five minutes

    A quick breakfast, 1/4 cup oatbran, 1/4 cup raisins, 2 tablespoons sugar, 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon, 1/8 teaspoon nutmeg prepackaged in a ziplock bag, 1 1/4 cup water. Bring water to boil, add contents of bag, simmer 5 minutes.

    Cowboy coffee - 1/4 cup coffee, 2 tablespoons sugar in ziploc bag. Bring 2 cups water to boil, add contents of bag and let steep 5 minutes. Filter coffee through a piece of screen or your dew rag.
    #8
  9. justJeff

    justJeff Banned

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    You guys are making me hungry! More than that, I want to get on my bike and go out in the woods and cook something.
    #9
  10. R_W

    R_W wannabe

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    depends on the type of trip and distance from food.

    Breakfast: Oatmeal and coffee

    Lunch: Diner somewhere on the road, GORP and snacks all day if on the trail.

    Dinner: For dehydrated splurge: www.maryjanesfarm.com, by far the best and healthiest of the dehydrateds. Usually a rice or noodle pack from the regular grocery store plus protein--steak or burger if close enough to camp to not spoil, hotdogs or canned salmon (I am sick of tuna) if further away.

    Don't forget the pre-cooked BACON--the best camp food to hit the grocery store EVER.
    #10
  11. Nitzo

    Nitzo Long timer

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    And a Prevost support vehicle?:D .
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  12. Lone Rider

    Lone Rider Registered User

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    There was a good past and recent thread about camping recipes that has some interesting takes on camping feeds.
    #12
  13. ownst1100

    ownst1100 BLUES TRAVELER 04'GSA

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    I can carry 2 days of food, breakfast,lunch and dinner keeping what ever needs to be kept cold cold. A nice breakfast of eggs,bacon,and coffee. A snack lunch and then a nice dinner, usually salmon, steam veggies and a nice glass of wine.

    [​IMG]

    This meal takes about 15 minutes total to make and clean up takes less. This cooking settup (not counting the one 442 stove and cookware) folds flat and fits in the lid of one Jesse bag.
    #13
  14. Nitzo

    Nitzo Long timer

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    THAT is a nice set-up.
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  15. Lone Rider

    Lone Rider Registered User

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    Really, it comes down to how much effort and time you want to put into camp cooking.
    #15
  16. silverdog

    silverdog Been here awhile

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    what is a pocket rocket stove??????????
    #16
  17. * SHAG *

    * SHAG * Unstable

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    My cooking while camping days are over, except for Mre's. I'm not much for restaurants while camping either, so I usually get something from a deli or some kind of take out. I always carry nuts, power bars, peanut butter & crackers and a few cans of other favorites just in case like vienna sausage, beanies, ham, tuna.
    #17
  18. Bigger Al

    Bigger Al Still a stupid tire guy

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    The Mountain House meals are pretty good in a pinch or when fresh provisions aren't practical. Otherwise, the sky's the limit. I carry a nicely setup kitchen on the bike, and can make most anything in camp that I can at home. You're really only limited by your creativity.
    #18
  19. justJeff

    justJeff Banned

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    It's made by MSR. It's a very small stove that screws onto the disposable cannisters. It weighs like 2.5oz, and the flame is very adjustable. It comes in a great little hard plastic case. It is very tiny, but the way it folds out it supports a pot well. I almost always have it in my bike. It and one of the small size cannisters fit inside my stainless steel cup with folding handles. It cools very quickly after us as well. It's great for quick stops alongside the road or trail to brew a cup of coffee or tea.

    I also have a few different multifuel and white gas stoves. For most bike travel though the pocket rocket has become my favorite. I like that you can use different size cannisters. For longer trips I will usually carry one larger on and one of the very small ones. If the large one runs out I have the small one to use until I can replace the larger one. For short trips, one small one is plenty.
    #19
  20. Borracho

    Borracho EDDIE WOULD GO

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    Minute Rice, curry powder (or other seasonings) sealed in Foodsaver bags. Using a JetBoil; add a cup of boiling water right into the bag. Add canned (or now in a zippack) chicken or a can of Dinty Moore stew and enjoy.

    JetBoils are nice especially for breakfast; can boil a max of 2 cups of water. Use one for oatmeal and one for coffee :D
    #20