What food do you pack for remote trips?

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by max384, Apr 29, 2013.

  1. davsato

    davsato Been here awhile

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    theres no need to spend $$ on special camping/hiking food, assuming you will have the facility to boil a pint or two of water, supermarket shelves are packed with dried goods that pack small and light, taste good and keep you fuelled.
    there are always plenty of noodles, pastas and rices to choose from,
    other favourites are instant mashed potato flakes (especially in bacon or fried onion flavour), instant porridge, jerky flaked and added to rice is quite nice, we have stuff called "beanfeast" here, dried soya meat substitute, (looks like dry mouse crap but rehydrates into fake beef mince+gravy. sounds awful but its really nice)

    pillsbury cinnamon twists are in a big tube but light and a total luxury after a hard day.
    #21
  2. davsato

    davsato Been here awhile

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  3. jon_l

    jon_l Long timer

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  4. tacosupreme

    tacosupreme Been here awhile

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    Sadly, just one. But stacked inside is a pack and a half of precooked deliciousness (40 or 50 slices) Having tried both, I believe it to be rebranded Yoders bacon. Buy in bulk and save! (12 cans $159.99)
    http://www.mredepot.com/servlet/the-364/Yoder%E2%80%99s-Celebrity-Canned-Bacon/Detail
    [​IMG]
    contents of one can
    [​IMG]
    #24
  5. MrPulldown

    MrPulldown Long timer

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    I was jsut about to write the SAME thing!!
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  6. davsato

    davsato Been here awhile

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    great minds think alike!
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  7. fractalsource

    fractalsource Adventurer

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    See: Superfoods are for real! http://youtu.be/c1wzs256OK4
    Part 2: http://youtu.be/MklPR2B0YfQ
    Part 3: http://youtu.be/xylmc0M4f9w
    David Wolfe on SuperFoods
    http://youtu.be/ZZZAGoA_fis

    Superfoods!
    http://www.thebestofrawfood.com/raw-food-travel.html

    Like:
    Goji berries. See: http://www.znaturalfoods.com/Goji-Berry-Extract-Powder-5-lbs
    Raw Cacoa snacks.
    Raw Food Bars
    Dried Jack Fruit.
    Maca snacks.
    Water.

    Superfood=Superpowers!
    http://youtu.be/lzuqIGkX2Vw

    I drink one of theses smoothies before I head out - and it's ON!
    See: David Wolfe - Raw Foods and Smoothies
    http://youtu.be/Ge0kYHjXHL0

    If none of this makes sense then see: THE WORLD's FIRST BIONIC BURGER!
    http://youtu.be/mYyDXH1amic
    #27
  8. Stonewall

    Stonewall The Wild

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    Just hanging out :deal
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  9. jkam

    jkam Nomadic Man

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    OK.
    When you pass by a city with a Cost Plus World Market stop, go in and head to the section with the sample sizes.
    Go wild, they have tons of great treats in easy to transport sizes. Meat and cheese that don't need a cooler, crackers,cookies, condiments etc.
    Don't forget to stop in the chocolate section and the beer section as well.

    Stop at the local market for a $5 rotisserie chicken, a can of beans or corn, a bag of ice for my Tequila and find camp.
    #29
  10. kamikazekyle

    kamikazekyle Been here awhile

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    Haven't done any camping on the moto yet (and my month-long trip just got pushed back by a few months, silly wedding), but have done lightweight backpacking and camping. The Mountain House stuff actually isn't bad -- especially if you don't want to carry/clean anything -- but they're a bit unhealthy. Pricey as all hell, too.

    MRE's are actually great if you can stomach them. Personally I love the things. Remember they're packed with calories on purpose. I haven't been able to reliably find a supplier in years, though.

    Homemade beef jerky is a great camp and trail food. Inexpensive if you do it at home, keeps a good while at all temps, and your oven probably can do all the dehydrating you need. Or use a box fan and some furnace filters (see Good Eats episode on jerky). Combine with shelf stable cheese, bread/tortillas, and a side of fruit/veggies for a pretty complete meal. You can also rehydrate jerky for use in stews and soups.

    Tortillas are awesome for saving space vs. bread. Corn are healthier, but I prefer flour or whole wheat. Multigrain crackers are small and have solid nutrition, but be ready to eat them as crumbs if you don't pack them in something solid :p

    Take some peanut butter, honey, dried fruit (cranberries and cherries are good), flax seed, slivered almonds, and sunflower seeds. Slap all that in a tortilla and enjoy. Tons of nutrients and tastes awesome.

    Powdered pancake mix comes in small packets and you just need water. Combine that with some dried fruit.

    Smoked meats/sausages are shelf stable. Ditto for a good many cheeses.

    I Can't Believe It's Not Butter is shelf stable and doesn't need to be refridgerated. I can believe it's not butter, but it's a good substitute. Likewise (jkam mentioned this) hoard or buy packets of condiments. Shelf stable for a decent period.

    Olive oil is shelf stable for all intents and purposes, is healthy, and can do multiple duties as fry oil, cooking oil, and flavor enhancer. Chain lube if you really wanna. Stir with some powdered spices to make a trail vinegarette for meat/jerky marinade or sauce for veggies/meats. Just using olive oil to fry something up can dramatically change its flavor profile.

    If you have the room/weight fresh veggies and fruits are awesome suppliments and will be plenty shelf stable for a day or two minimum. Planning ahead you can dehydrate damn near any fruit or veggie at home. Avoid canned stuff if you can as it destroys most of the nutritional content of veggies and their flavor.

    Others have mentioned the individual packets of tuna. These are great too, but pricey compared to a can of tuna. I pack a can if I can afford the space/weight, or put it in some tupperware that I plan on reusing later to save weight. It's not like it's a huge price difference, but yea :p

    Look into dehydrated beans and legumes. Make sure that you can presoak them in ambient temp water and have time for it -- you really don't want to waste a ton of fuel trying to keep a rolling boil going for a long time.

    Others have mentioned instant oatmeal. Don't buy the retail stuff -- make your own. Really freaking easy, tons less sugar, and much better nutritional content. Same space, less cash.

    Bullion and/or stock cubes are tiny and come in a variety of types (beef, chicken, veggie, etc). Toss these in with some water, jerky, and dehydrated veggies for a soup or stew. You can also add in dehydrated beans if you have some, but rehydrate those first. Though the cubes tend to be high in sodium so keep that in mind.

    Boil-in-the-bag stuff is great since you prepare, cook, and eat all in the same bag and can transition to pot-based cooking just fine.

    Anyway, general rule of thumb is look to backpacking and DIY boil-in-the-bag type recipies. On a moto you're probably less concerned than a backpacker about weight and/or space. You can only go but so far from civilization without packing inordinate amounts of fuel, so trying to get 7 days of food into a 10L packing space isn't really necessary. Well, unless you're plopping your moto somewhere for a week to hike on foot, but that's a different story.
    #30
  11. Jamie Z

    Jamie Z Long timer

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    Interesting. I'm going to have to look into those.

    Thanks for posting.

    Jamie
    #31
  12. frogy

    frogy Been here awhile

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    The big meal for me is breakfast. I make my own oatmeal mix; for 2 mornings I mix one pack of Trader Joes Apple & Cinn., a handful of dried cranberries, banana chips, quaker oats 1 min. oatmeal (no sugar),and cream of wheat, in a ziplock bag. This mix stays with ya for several hours.
    #32
  13. davsato

    davsato Been here awhile

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    hey you know, i'd forgotten about that! used to be dinner on the way back from the pub, a whole chicken, bottle of wine, loaf of bread and american style cheese spread/slices. dinner for 1x drunk student less than £10 and often a lot less because late at night theyre selling off the days deli and bakery stuff. substitute the chicken for a bucket of curry, pies, sausage, hocks, bacon joints, whatever was left.

    (depending on amount of beer drunk, often EVERYTHING that was left! those were the days....)
    #33
  14. Sparrowhawk

    Sparrowhawk Long timer

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    It's never been an issue traveling by motorcycle no matter how remote. Backpacking, kayaking, & bicycle touring, yes, but not motorcycle traveling. Motorcycles need gas. Gas outlets generally have some kind of food for sale or are located in some small town or village.

    You may have trouble finding fresh vegetables or steaks, and you might eat Raman or mac and cheese, but you won't go hungry.

    At the very worst you might miss a meal. That wouldn't hurt most of us. Water is much more important.

    Sent from my SCH-I535 using Tapatalk 2
    #34
  15. Jamie Z

    Jamie Z Long timer

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    It's true, but it does come up. Two instances come to mind during my travels, both times in Texas.

    I was heading into Big Bend National Park. According to Wikipedia, "Big Bend is one of the largest, most remote, and least-visited national parks in the lower 48 United States." I was planning to stay a few days. Sure, there's a camp store in the park, and a gas station with a few snacks. And there's even a restaurant. But if you want to eat right and not pay a bundle, one has to bring in his own food. I stopped at the grocery store beforehand and loaded up.

    Later the same trip, I spent a couple days at Chinati Hot Springs. It's not all that remote. I suppose you could find a store within 15 or 20 miles of the place, and if you were in dire need, I'm sure the caretakers who live on the property would feed you. The point is, no food is available, and if you want to spend a couple days there, and you want to enjoy yourself, you ought to carry some food you can prepare while you're there.

    Jamie
    #35
  16. max384

    max384 Bandaided

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    I agree that the vast majority of the time food won't be a problem... But I was asking the question for the few times where food won't be readily available for a few days, or when I wouldn't want to rely on eating what food I could find at a gas station.
    #36
  17. Marine By Choice

    Marine By Choice Sergeant 0311

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    I carry a few "bird shot" rounds for whichever pistol I have with me at the time. You would not believe how good fresh quail or doves taste when you ran out or forgotten a bag of food you had intended to bring with you!
    #37
  18. Jamie Z

    Jamie Z Long timer

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    How do you heat them? Instructions on the package are for microwave. Do you boil the bag or put the contents into a saucepan or what?

    Jamie
    #38
  19. bikerfish

    bikerfish flyfishandride

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    I'm not going anywhere "remote" with anyone that has replied so far, your food sucks! :puke1
    #39
  20. Just Dan

    Just Dan Bugger, Burnt toast

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