What Is The Advantage Of Large Displacement In The Dirt?

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by BeerIsGood, Mar 11, 2012.

  1. lethe

    lethe Long timer

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    different kind of cow :rofl

    neither would fit on the back of the seat I'm sure

    Hey Baby, Got Milk? :evil
    #41
  2. Ritalin Boy

    Ritalin Boy Petroconsumptivitius

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    Dirtwise with Shane Watts. Best two days of instruction I've ever had.

    If you can't get in a class, buy the DVD'S.
    #42
  3. StolenFant

    StolenFant Been here awhile

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    Just went to Dirt Wise, but it appears to be entirely based on 100% dirt bikes, or at most the lighter barely street capable enduro bikes.:cry:cry Still I've emailed them to see if they have anything to help.

    So, anyone have info on good instruction for the multi-cylinder ADV bikes?

    Thanks!
    #43
  4. Rucksta

    Rucksta SS Blowhard

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    Learn to ride a small bike first
    #44
  5. StolenFant

    StolenFant Been here awhile

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    That's the problem. I did learn to ride a small bike first, XR75, Hodaka DirtSquirt, CR 125, CR250, CR450. They're VERY different from the big bikes, but thanks for the advice. :huh
    #45
  6. Rucksta

    Rucksta SS Blowhard

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    It wasn't meant to be as flip as it sounds.

    Fresh experience on the lighter bike gave me new ways to assert my authority
    over the large capacity bike making log jumps and drop offs much more relaxed than previously.

    It's more about controlling the momentum than any radical change in the physics.
    #46
  7. Ritalin Boy

    Ritalin Boy Petroconsumptivitius

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    Two weeks after my Dirtwise class I did a big bike dualsport on my adventure. More than one buddy (NETR Enduro champ types) commented on my improvements.

    The techniques are the same but it takes more time / effort to accomplish the same thing on a big bike.

    For a brief tutorial come to Colors in the Catskills or any event Max BMW is offering instruction.
    #47
  8. FinlandThumper

    FinlandThumper Has Cake/Eats it Too Super Moderator

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    This is EXCELLENT advice and all too frequently forgotten. Marketing tends to have that effect on people. :freaky

    Basically, make your problem as simple as possible, but no simpler. Match your tool to the job at hand. Don't use a sledge hammer to hang a picture. Don't use a picture hanging hammer to frame out rough carpentry for your remodel. Etc.

    I am personally a fan of the big BMW GS bikes...but then again, I'm pretty much a fan of all bikes so that's no surprise. And when our child gets older and we return to two-up touring on all kinds of road surfaces, the big BMW GS will be in my garage. But for now? Shorter to longer tours, one-up, mixed surface riding, no true trail riding? The BMW F650GS does everything required at half the displacement, less weight, less money, simple repairs (can't say simpler since I don't know).

    Why complicate things and spend more money than needed, only to end up with a tool which doesn't even do the job as well?
    #48
  9. StolenFant

    StolenFant Been here awhile

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    Yes, it was excellent advice. I'm just a bit frustrated by not knowing what I want, and DISCOVERING what I can no longer do. The Wee's a very inexpensive fence I'm straddling, and thanks to those SW Motech engine guards, It doesn't suffer nearly as much from my "discoveries" as my body does. But damn, you should see the grin on my face!:D I don't know how I quit riding for a quarter century. Oh, that's right :sweeti ... :rogue...
    #49
  10. glasswave

    glasswave Been here awhile

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    Well, a large displacement twin adv bike will be more comfortable for gobbling up 100's of kms of washboard/gravel (if you call that off road) than a light enduro. Think ruta 40 in Patagonia, the Parmir or Korakoram Highways, the road of bones etc.

    The big adv twins are supposed to be versatile bikes that are comfortable/fun on long highway trips, but still be able to handle the occasional bit of 4wd terrain. They are for world touring not week end dirt forays. Think of them like a Ford f350 long bed with a nice camper. A comfortable round the world cruiser, but when the going gets truely tough you may prefer a jeep.

    Don't get your hopes up. A DR or especially a KLR is not going to be very much fun in the rough stuff either. If you want to start throwing donuts and flying over the whoopty doos in a single leap, I'd be looking for something well under 300 lbs. Maybe a KTM 500exc.

    At least a strom is fun in the twisties, a klr simply isn't much fun anywhere. That's what makes em so great for everything, there not any good at anything.
    #50
  11. Rucksta

    Rucksta SS Blowhard

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    Everytime I hear someone say

    "big bikes are only good for dirt roads and carrying lots of luggage"

    I think they haven't tried a well set up big bike in the dirt yet.
    #51
  12. NJ-Brett

    NJ-Brett Brett

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    And every time I see a big heavy bike in the dirt, I think broken bones.
    Or the joys of something really light on sandy whoops.


    #52
  13. NJ-Brett

    NJ-Brett Brett

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    A dr650 with the suspension set up and good tires does quite well at moderate speeds, and even higher speeds in rough stuff.
    Its not EASY, plus it really hurts when you fall, and you will fall...




    #53
  14. Rucksta

    Rucksta SS Blowhard

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    When the title said large displacement I thought it meant engine capacity not how much water is moved aside when submerged :D
    #54
  15. markk53

    markk53 jack of all trades...

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    Well, based on your name tag, it's because you can fill the bags with ice and a few cases of beer and still pull the hills. :1drink
    #55
  16. BeerIsGood

    BeerIsGood Guest

    :clap Awesome! :D
    #56
  17. 2handedSpey

    2handedSpey bunned

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    I am 6'4" and 180. A KLx and or Yamaha 250 or tw200 is just too small for me. I ride a KLR because of its tallish size AND I don't want to tow the bike around on a trailer. If I wanna go offroading, I'll ride there and get 50+ mpg!!!:lol3


    But, I certainly don't like picking that fat turd up when I tip
    #57
  18. Ceri JC

    Ceri JC UK GSer

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    ...Or they have, but they can't ride, or they're a midget weakling. I've seen a 5'2" 55KG woman pick up a GSA in the dirt and then ride it so fast I couldn't keep her in sight on a 450 enduro bike. These guys who think a 690 is too heavy for the dirt must have some sort of terrible wasting degenerative disease.
    :D

    Seriously though, big dirt bikes, don't knock it till you've tried it.
    #58
  19. dashmoto

    dashmoto Serial Tinkerer

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    My Tenere is better in the dirt than a small enduro bike because it actually gets ridden.

    From a UK (and probably Western Euro generally) point of view, there is no such thing as wilderness single-track. If you can put together a full day's ride (>100 miles) that's more than 50% dirt then you are either a very wealthy private landowner, riding round in circles on a pay-to-play site, or riding round in circles on the same few trails. Among the trails we've got there's even fewer that you couldn't get a 4x4 down.

    I ride with guys who do use enduro bikes, and I swear they do more miles on trailers/in vans than they do riding them. I've had enduro bikes when I was racing enduro, and they ended up coming out of the garage once a month to go racing. The one time I did go trail-riding on one of them I drove an hour in the van, half a day alternating between being uncomfortable on the tarmac stretches and bored on the trails because it made it too easy, and then it broke down.

    In the end I sold my last enduro bike and put the money into the suspension on the Tenere. I've not regretted it once. I've only once got into a situation where the big bike got me stuck and I was glad of help to get it out (crankcases wedged in a massive rut where a smaller bike might have squeezed through, or at least been easier to manhandle out).

    YMMV ;)

    I do also think there is something in the idea of big bikes being more stable in fast fire-road type riding. The Tenere will plough through stuff that would have had my (half the weight) GasGas EC300 bouncing off the lockstops.
    #59
  20. glasswave

    glasswave Been here awhile

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    Yeah, I was speaking to the klr at 430 lbs mostly. The DR although heavy is nothing like a klr.
    #60