What is the best DualSport to own as a Mexican?

Discussion in 'Latin America' started by hockabigloogy, Aug 19, 2014.

  1. hockabigloogy

    hockabigloogy Got Buddah?

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2010
    Oddometer:
    87
    Location:
    Tate's Hell State Forest, flatistan
    OK, I'm old, and broke but when i sell off all the crap I have here in the states, I'm moving to Mexico, and I'm not talking a gated community full of gringoes viejos with poop in their shorts. If all goes well, I'll have my permanente in about six or seven months.

    I've owned KLR 650s and I had a BMW funduro. But to the average Mexican its 125ccVille.
    Thats what's available. I want to blend in, find parts, buy used, once i get there.
    Those Italia bikes sure look stupid. I bet they are crappy. I'll bet it is a hona that will rule.

    What say you, muchachoes del camino?

    I'd like to import a KLR250 but I hear it will be hell to do so.
    #1
  2. Kiko

    Kiko Long timer

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2006
    Oddometer:
    2,168
    Location:
    Jalisco, Mexico 45800
  3. hockabigloogy

    hockabigloogy Got Buddah?

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2010
    Oddometer:
    87
    Location:
    Tate's Hell State Forest, flatistan
    #3
  4. Kiko

    Kiko Long timer

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2006
    Oddometer:
    2,168
    Location:
    Jalisco, Mexico 45800
    Import 150cc or smaller and save on import taxes.
    #4
  5. Airhead Wrangler

    Airhead Wrangler Long timer

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2008
    Oddometer:
    6,822
    Location:
    Back in Seattle, FINALLY
    Honda tornado or a CRF230. Not gonna be cheap though.
    #5
  6. pax maac

    pax maac Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2008
    Oddometer:
    504
    Location:
    Toluca, Mexico (near Mexico City)
    Importing's not a big deal. I've done a car and a bike, and am planning to do another bike soon. It's not hell at all.

    Italika, Vento, all those Chinese bikes are crap. I wouldn't waste your time or money on them.

    I have experience with mostly BMW and Yamaha down here, and any time I need a BMW part I check with Beemerboneyard and my local dealer here and it's been 50/50 sometimes the part is cheaper here, sometimes it's cheaper to order it from the US.
    #6
  7. Arte

    Arte Pata de Perro

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2008
    Oddometer:
    1,610
    Location:
    LEON, Gto. MEXICO
    Once you get settled in México, you can join these guys for riding, they are low cc bikers (110cc, 125cc, 250cc) doing off road and they have a lot of fun..

    http://motorutamexico.com/
    #7
  8. tricepilot

    tricepilot El Gran Payaso

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2006
    Oddometer:
    9,597
    Location:
    San Antonio
    What part of simply moving to Mexico will make you "a Mexican"? I'm taking it as you wish to know what the locals ride. I could be wrong.

    And be careful with enjoying the huevos rancheros down there. Miscalculating the gas you'll feel tempted to 'valve off' later is often the cause of "gringoes viejos with poop in their shorts." You've been warned :lol3
    #8
  9. AndyT

    AndyT Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2004
    Oddometer:
    680
    Location:
    Seguin, TX, USA
    I would take a look at the Bajaj line, but they are not dual sport style. Used all over Latin America, and the people who have them seem happy with them. Made in India, the 200 is EFI, and shares some basic architecture with the KTM 200 Duke. Bajaj owns at least a portion of KTM, but I don't hold that against them.
    #9
  10. crashmaster

    crashmaster ow, my balls!

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2007
    Oddometer:
    5,548
    Location:
    Alaska
    You know something's wrong when your buddy stops in front of you, turns around and says, "Hey, does gas have lumps?"

    :lol3:lol3:lol3

    [​IMG]

    My preference would probably be a Tornado 250, but they are not cheap either. Like the previous post mentioned, maybe take a look at the Pulsars (Bajaj). I think they are around $2000 USD less than the Tornado IIRC. Most folks I talked to as well seem pretty happy with them, and although not a true DS, folks ride those bike everywhere.

    Here are some thoughts from forums that might be helpful: http://moteroscolombia.com/foro/44-comparaciones/15474-honda-xr250-tornado-vs-bajaj-pulsar-200.html

    http://www.club-bajaj.com/t2113p10-gracias-y-hasta-siempre-bajaj-pulsar-200-hola-xr-250-tornado
    #10
  11. damasovi

    damasovi Long timer

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2006
    Oddometer:
    2,730
    Location:
    Ensenada, Baja California
    cheap? expensive? that is not at all a universal thing.

    If you buy new then you will pay as much as in the usa, an example, a 250 yamaha wr250r you will pay $6690 plus fees, and tax so maybe $8,000. That bike is not available in Mexico, instead you can find a Tenere 250 that is more touring oriented at $75K pesos or at today's exchange rate of $12.8 = $5,851 and this is OTD prices. This is the most expensive 250 available in Mexico.

    A Lander from Yamaha is almost not available, it has been replace by the Tenere and it costed about the same. Now a Tornado from HOnda will be cheaper, $4,921 or so. Remember that in the USA the Honda cr250L sells for more and the KLX250 also (please include the stealer fees and such).

    If you still want new but want to pay less, I would go and but an XTZ125 from yamaha, or the NRX150 from HOnda (FI). The yamaha is less than $2.5K USD and the honda around $3,700 (because of the bigger engine and FI). And last the XR125L Honda is the same price (almost) as the Yamaha 125, all 3 bikes are great and I would buy one and go around all over Mexico with them, I would prefer the yamaha 125 simple because it has a 21 front and better tire options (dirt oriented).

    IF you want to pay less then go used and you will find a lot, depending on where in Mexico you are going... About Italikas, some of my friends have then, and they all say they are worth every penny, they need attention, and a constant inspection of everything, much like the hondas and other Japaneses bikes.

    get you FM in place and get a licencies so you do not waste your money importing a bike. I have imported 2 of my 5 bikes and for my klr paid $1400+ and for my TW paid $800+ so it is not cheap.. think of all the farkless you can buy with $2,200!!!

    Cheers man
    #11
  12. hockabigloogy

    hockabigloogy Got Buddah?

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2010
    Oddometer:
    87
    Location:
    Tate's Hell State Forest, flatistan
    Hopefully shacking up wif a Mexican cutie, drinking the water (and Kool Aide), Micheladas, and Caña, not paying mordidas by becoming Napolean Dynomite, and riding with locals will help make me mo Mexican.
    if it doesnt maybe some kind Mexican family will adopt me!

    Thanks to all for lots of ideas...
    #12
  13. SR

    SR Long timer

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2008
    Oddometer:
    1,069
    Location:
    Western, Mexico
    Tens of thousands of Mexicans ride 125cc class bikes and nearly every one of them would ride a bigger bike if they could afford it. 125cc beats taking the bus to work, but IMO is too slow and dangerous for traveling on the open Mexican highway. Depends on if you want to use the bike to putt around town or go out and travel.

    In my experience, just the state of Texas alone has a better selection of used motorcycles than all of Mexico, and around 20% lower prices even after paying 20-37% import taxes. You do have to consider the cost and PITA of the logistics of importing, but if you are going back and forth anyway it's worth it. Used bikes from the US are generally much more well maintained than Mexican bikes.

    In central and southern Mexico a 250cc class DS bike would work, but northern Mexico is big with big open roads and I'd go with a 650 class bike if you plan to settle in northern Mexico.
    #13
  14. tricepilot

    tricepilot El Gran Payaso

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2006
    Oddometer:
    9,597
    Location:
    San Antonio
    A small issue for which I would be happy to assist

    :freaky
    #14
  15. SR

    SR Long timer

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2008
    Oddometer:
    1,069
    Location:
    Western, Mexico
    Thanks Man!

    It's important to consider that the logistics of buying a used bike in Mexico can also be a PITA too. With the limited market you may have to travel halfway across the country to look at a single bike on Mercadolibre. In northern Mexico we are a lot closer to the US MC market than the motorcycles in the population centers of Central Mexico.
    #15
  16. tricepilot

    tricepilot El Gran Payaso

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2006
    Oddometer:
    9,597
    Location:
    San Antonio
    Well, there are those considerations

    More important is the fact that I'm a cheap date

    :lol3
    #16
  17. Klutch

    Klutch gringo goatrider

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2005
    Oddometer:
    237
    Location:
    Punta de Mita, Nayarit
    The WR250F is one of my favorite bikes down here that work pretty well for everything once you decork them.There's plenty of good ones around $5K. Of course the newer WR450F like SR imported is fuel injected but those are a little harder to find. My wife's WR250X (not sold here) is perfect around town but it gets looks more than any of our other bikes for some reason. Kinda makes me nervous.
    I've been trying to decide on the perfect bike myself but of course there's no such thing. I love 2-strokes and prefer my KTM200 for racing tight stuff. With the elevation changes here, the little 200 isn't so great at going from sea-level to over 5,000 ft in an hour ride on singletrack. That's where the FI bikes shine especially the bigger bores, 350cc plus.
    I've been playing with jetting on a new KTM300XC-W lately but since it's not FI there's no prefect setting. Need a FI 2-stroke!
    I'll probably end up with a Fuel Injected 450cc bike like SR imported but really enjoy the capabilities of the 300XC-W when riding extreme enduro trails. The big 4-strokes are pretty heavy to lift overhead when you're riding solo so you end up looking for help or turning back. I'm not very big and am getting old fast!
    For blacktop roads a 650cc moto is the minimum if you want to get anywhere fast in Mexico or the US. My DL650 V-Strom was way too big for town and way too small for cuotas and fast libres.
    My buddy has an XR650R that's pretty versatile and bullet-proof but it's really a desert bike at heart.
    Basically no such thing as a "best dualsport" they're all a compromise.
    #17
  18. Mainecoons

    Mainecoons Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2014
    Oddometer:
    189
    Location:
    Beautiful Lake Chapala, Jalisco
    I live in Mexico, Lake Chapala area, and ride most weekends. There are ample opportunities for both playing in the dirt, day riding with a ton of twisties on pavement of variable quality, and touring. The climate in central Mexico is benign practically all the time though it can get pretty wet from June through September.

    We have a fairly good sized local contingent of riders including several who have done well over 100K miles here. One of them rides an R1200GS, one rides either his Ducati sport bike, his Vstrom1000 or a KLR650. Most of the rest of us ride BMW--F650GS, F700GS, R850R (me), some cruisers and some R1200GS. And a KTM.

    It really all depends on what you like riding and what kind of riding you will do. I stick to pavement as do most of the GS guys but several get together for dirt rides. At this time of year those are mostly mud rides so they aren't doing much.

    I really like the short wheelbase and lower gearing and lower seating of the R850R though it can be just a bit power challenged in the higher altitudes and a bit suspension challenged by the rough roads and topes. I'm addressing all of those issues with an AF-XIED, cat converter removal and Ohlins shocks set up for rougher roads.

    If you are planning to move to the Lake Chapala area I'd be happy to correspond with you and fill you in on cost/availability of housing and that sort of thing. Lake Chapala has one of the most perfect climates in the world yet we are only a half hour away from a major airport and a little further to Guadalajara itself. There are a ton of riders in Guadalajara and hence we have a number of excellent shops that can work on your bike at reasonable cost. I do tend to order my routine parts on line and pick them up when I'm in the states. They are much cheaper there.

    Bikes and cars are expensive here, but so is importing. With a Permanente Visa you cannot use a TIP (temporary import permit). The cost of importing a bike can easily run $2,000 to $3,000. The best importing deal seems to be a guy named "Oscar" in Nogales, AZ. Let me know if you want his email.
    #18