What kind of tire plugs?

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by dcwn.45, Mar 30, 2008.

  1. dcwn.45

    dcwn.45 Frozen Rider

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    I have a small air compressor, and want to carry a patch kit for my Vstrom [tubeless tires].

    What kind of plugs should I get, and where can I get them?

    Any other tire repair tips or tools I should have ?
    #1
  2. GSWayne

    GSWayne Old Guy nOOb

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    Some people have success with the plugs (Stop and Go http://www.stopngo.com/motorcycle.asp), but more are happy with the sticky string type repair kits. Especially in steel belted tires the StopnGo pulgs tend to get cut in half and fail. The cheap sticky string kits seem to work but if you want a high quality one, get a Safety Seal one.

    http://www.safetyseal.com/store/autokits.htm

    The Safety Seal kit can be repacked much smaller (I keep mine in the little StopnGo pouch).
    #2
  3. VStromTom

    VStromTom Long timer

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    Those tar snakes Wally sells. Work great.
    #3
  4. JR356

    JR356 Long timer

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    Hi.,

    Second on the string/rope type plugs from any auto parts store,Walmart,Kmart,etc.
    Monkey Grip and Vulcan are good brands,get the type made for radials.

    Someone at one point posted a kit that all broke down and stored
    in the handle,I'd like to find this kit if anyone knows the source.

    JR356
    #4
  5. ooweel

    ooweel Jobless, Its OK!

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    #5
  6. Trinity

    Trinity Byron in Texas

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    +1 on good ole' Wally World sticky rope plugs...plug-n-go sucks ass...(the plugs, not the concept) DAMHIKT :puke1
    #6
  7. svwayne

    svwayne Been here awhile

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  8. mkatz

    mkatz Adventurer

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    I've just opened a safety seal tire repair kit that I had ordered last week. The "strings" and tools were a bit larger in diameter than I had expected. Please reassure me: does this kit actually work with to repair typical screw/nail holes without require monster strength to insert?
    #8
  9. svwayne

    svwayne Been here awhile

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    I've used mine with no problems. Use the lube supplied in the kit. Make sure you have the SSRS or SSRA size plugs and not the larger ones for trucks and heavy equipment.
    #9
  10. dan-c

    dan-c Back

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    I keep both the stop and go and the string ones in the top case. The stop n go are good for a small puncture but the strings are better for cuts (we have some sharp rocks down here)
    #10
  11. DrumRunner

    DrumRunner It's all about the ride!

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    Check out this Site: http://www.tirerepairkit.com/ !
    That's what I went with.:wink:
    I haven't had to use it yet, but I like the fact that they pioneered it and supply a good quality kit at a very reasonable price[​IMG]
    #11
  12. CodyY

    CodyY ADVenture Capitalist

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    JUNK.

    www.myerstiresupply.com

    Find your local branch and order up a passenger car repair insert kit.
    Uses rubber inserts instead of the string that will wick up more road grime into the tire and further contaminating the steel belts.

    I used to sell for these guys, good company, great products. They really know what they're talking about.
    #12
  13. JR356

    JR356 Long timer

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    Well,you are entitled to your opinion,but those kits have worked just fine for me personally in both auto and MC apps over thousands of miles!
    I used to be in auto repair and have changed/repaired more tires than I want to think about.If I did not feel confident with these products,I would not be using them or recommending them.

    I have no doubt the product you recommend is just fine too.
    The link you provided does not work for me,so I can't see the product.
    There have been more than a few reports of rubber plug repairs(Stop n Go,etc)failing in steel belted MC tires.The string plugs don't fail.

    The best repair is whatever gets you going,until you can breakdown the tire and use a patchplug.

    JR356
    #13
  14. tbirdsp

    tbirdsp REMF

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    Another vote here that Stop n Go rubber plugs SUCK (I had 2 failures) and sticky strings work (ran one plugged tire 1000 miles and another 4000 miles).

    YMMV
    #14
  15. CodyY

    CodyY ADVenture Capitalist

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    I agree with you 100% here, this is the only approved method and is the only way to truly "repair" the injury and seal the leak.

    Instead of a string plug that will wick road grime and oil up into the tire. Myers/Patch Rubber company (I don't kow what's up with the site?? Should be up) make what's called a Mono-Fill. Instead of gummy string, it's a strip of rubber that's coated in un-cured rubber. They install just like a string plug only you use patch cement on them to seal the injury. They fit tighter, actually seal to the rubber and prevent further damage to the steel belts. About twice the price of string repairs, but what's your tires worth on a bike?

    just FYI.

    <10 year Lexus/Cadillac Technician/ASE master/Service manager turned Tire supply salesman/ now in construction mgmt.
    #15
  16. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid!

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    I have run them as many as 9000 miles on a new tire that caught a nail. I much prefer string plugs over the rubber kind!

    I even did a tutorial with pics on how! http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=197217

    Jim :brow
    #16
  17. braindead0

    braindead0 Head Fisherman

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    How does road grime 'wick' up anything? As far as I can tell the string type plugs are not going to wick anything. In order for something to wick it has to be fairly open, if these were capable of wicking anything they would also leak air.
    #17
  18. GARider

    GARider Wandering Thru Life

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    Plus one thousand on the Stop & Go suck. The steel belts will cut them into and they will fail. I use the strings, just buy a good brand. I buy the packs that have 4 to 6 strings and the glue in them. They are just a few dollars at the local auto supply. I replace them about once a year, that was I know the glue hasn't dried up and is fresh. Buy the heaver T handed pluger tools, they are a lot easyer to use. Also I carry a single edge razor blade to trim of the excess plug sticking out. That way the plug is not working its self back and forth, this can cause one to leak. You can also use two or three to stop a big hole, you can't do that with Stop & Go plugs. I have done that just to get me down the road till I could get a new tire put on. But I have pluged small nail holes and run them. Just replaced one that got a finishing nail after being on only two weeks and ran it for a little over 9,000 miles.

    Roger
    #18
  19. CodyY

    CodyY ADVenture Capitalist

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    Those plugs are literally just string that have been coated in a sticky coating. As you drive over the road the string will soak up contaminates and this *COULD* lead to deterioration of the steel belts in the tire. Increasing the likleyhood of catostrauphic failure.

    I don't know about you, but I prefer to keep my tires ON the rim. And minimizing any chances of failure is the best way to do so.
    #19
  20. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid!

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    Not coated, impregnated. They wont soak up anything. They have been used in cars and bikes for many many years. At least the steel belts wont shear them off like rubber plugs.

    Anyhow, this can go round and round. People will choose what they are comfortable with.

    Jim :brow
    #20