What to eat on the road that is relatively healthy?

Discussion in 'Trip Planning' started by scorch, Jun 23, 2016.

  1. Biddles

    Biddles Suck it easy!

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    I found Cambells Chunky soups to be my favorite meals on the road. They can be had for $1.00-$1.99, and come in a ton of varieties. On top of that they are easy to open, and easy to eat only needing a spoon or just slurp it out of the can like I did some nights. I wound up only heating up one can on my entire trip. Most tend to be a bit heavy on the salt, but if you drink mostly water it evens out. Some have low salt varieties too.

    Very hard to find good cheap food on the go, it's practically an oxymoron. Aside from the Cambells, I mostly ate peanut butter out of the jar, and maple and brown sugar oatmeal. Those canned tuna fish meals were very tasty, not sure about healthy though.
    #41
  2. kavallerist

    kavallerist Alltid hästens fel

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    If eating out in Scandinavia aim for lunch at golf clubs, normal prices but a really decent home cooked meal.
    #42
  3. monkey wrench

    monkey wrench Been here awhile

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    I eat salad kits from the grocery store or Jo Joes and fried chicken. It works out slick if you can get to camp with the beer still cold and the chicken warm.
    #43
  4. anotheroldfart

    anotheroldfart Been here awhile

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    When on the road: Breakfast at Mc D. Egg Mc with a large coffee and free WiFi to catch up on email and trip planning.

    Lunch at a decent truck stop. Just avoid the buffet. Dinner at Cracker Barrel or Big Boy or similar restaurant.

    Pick up a bottle of Gatorade to hydrate, but avoid at all costs eating a convenience store Burrito. But if you do and get heartburn and the shits later, don't whine I didn't warn you.
    #44
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  5. ta-rider

    ta-rider Returned from Africa

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    [​IMG]

    Why? Specially in 3rd world countrys people sell the best food you can expect just beside the road for just 1 Dollar per portion. Fresh orange juice, fish, vegetables...i never take a cooker while traveling: http://afrikamotorrad.eu/?report=en_westkueste

    [​IMG]
    #45
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  6. Use2btrix

    Use2btrix Been here awhile

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    This... many other countries have night markets all over the place. I've been backinglacking Southeast Asia the last 6 weeks and they're everywhere. Dirt cheap too. The only reason I eat "less healthy" on vacation is because back home I count every single calorie, carb, protein, fat, etc down to the nearest gram. Well, my wife does.

    Phuket - Thailand. These big meat shishkabobs came out to be about $1.50 a piece.

    IMG_8599.JPG

    Luang Prabang - Laos. Taken a few hrs ago. We had two chicken breasts, 6 chicken wings, 5 egg rolls, a beer, and Diet Coke for less than $7 total. That was for two people.

    IMG_9827.JPG
    #46
  7. Ohio_Danimal

    Ohio_Danimal If I die trying, at least I tried

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    I've really enjoyed improving my camping/cooking skills this last several years on Adv rides. I even like having the daily search for fresh ingredients. If I get the ingredients around lunch time, there's no issues with needing to refrigerate until cooked in the evening at camp.
    I'm on a low-carb diet and my usual larger meal while travelling in basically meat/vegetables.
    Nearly every grocery store has a cut or two of meat marked down. Doesn't matter to me whether beef, chicken or pork. Can usually get my meat for that day's meal for <$4
    Same with veggies. A handful of fresh green beans, a small bunch of asparagus, small amount of snow pea pods....all can be had for around a buck.
    Always cut the meat into bite sized pieces before cooking. As I use an alcohol burner, I carry peanut oil which takes differing levels of heat well and last a long time w/out refrigeration.
    Cut meat, add peanut oil and whatever spices and cook until well browned. Set aside.
    Now add veggies to pot, add a bit of water, refill alcohol burner and start steaming.
    As soon as a good boil is reached, open lid and add the meat to the mix, including whatever oil, juices, etc are with the meat.
    Steam another 10 minutes and you're done. This is usually quite enough for two people, or a LOT for one. Very low on carbs and healthy as hell.

    [​IMG]
    Sometimes peeled/deveined shrimp are on sale pretty cheap and are used for meat.
    For dessert, stick with fruit.
    #47
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  8. TUCKERS

    TUCKERS the famous james

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    Depends how long you are 'on the road'..if it's a lifestyle you'd better get on board with healthy food and drink before long. If it's a vacation from work trip, two weeks or so....do whatever you want.....you can recover quite quickly.

    On a 75 day trip we did:
    Oatmeal and coffee or tea for breakfast.
    Fruit or raw veggies for daytime.
    Beer and whatever for dinner.
    We both lost weight (and muscle mass) on this trip.
    Be sure to drink LOTS of water.
    Don't worry you'll recover.
    I think the bottom line is if you are eating healthy at home you will eat healthy on the road...you just make it work.
    If you are pigging out and eating crap at home you'll do the same on a trip.
    #48
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  9. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

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    I rarely ride anywhere for long other than in France. Breakfast is easy, buy some croissant. Pretty much every village will have a decent boulangerie, and after a while - I've been doing this for 40+ years - you learn to spot the better ones. Take your little baggie and pootle along till you find a cafe to your liking - views, or interesting characters, fancy decor, whatever. I like the PMU's, the state betting bars, lots of old guys drinking beer at 8am.
    If its cool, a hot chocolate, if its warm, then a grande creme. My partner prefers a cappuccino.
    Lunch - well food is really the only thing I bother planning. You are rarely that far from a Michelin star restaurant. Lunchtime special menus are always excellent value. They just can't afford to serve crap and piss off their regulars, and it is better to make a little than nothing. So they give you value, and usually a real treat.
    Sometimes there is somewhere special, worth gussying up for in the evening. On those days we generally have something light for lunch. France has many what you may mistake for an organic farmers market - its just a French market.
    In small towns and villages, its rare that anything comes from more than a handful of miles away. You often see stalls with very little, a few lettuce, a n old coffee jar with the last of the dried beans, a bunch or two of radish, may be a rabbit, maybe a chicken - they will kill it for you if you want.
    We usually get some goat cheese, although if there are specialist cheese stalls, especially up in mountain areas, they often have something interesting that is rarely seen elsewhere. Tomatoes - I love those heritage tomatoes that dribble down your chin. Peaches, melons or apricots as you get further south. Of course there are boulangeries for bagettes, ficelles or flutes. Often little savoury tartlets, quiches, mini pies or pizza too. The traiteur will have all sorts of charcuterie, dried or cured ham, pates, salamis of multiple and diverse types.
    As ever the problem is avoiding buying too much. Although in a country where much shopping is still done on a day to day basis rather than the grueling monthly grind with multiple over filled trolleys at costco or the W place. The stalls are used to selling small amounts.

    Beverages - Bars and cafes everywhere. they all sell wine and beer and coffee too. The tea is usually terrible.
    Wines, I tend to drop into a few vinyards and buy a bottle or two. Restaurants which sell wine by the glass are great for trying out the local vintners. I make a note of the better ones. then go shop there, after a few quality checks.
    Beers: all supermarkets will have lots. Well known European brands - the lager stuff, a decent range of Belgian monkish beers, usually at prestige prices. And my tent pitching favourite, Valstar, red label. Which all my French friends think is a joke. I do like its fuller body and stronger hoppiness. I would not necessarily want to spend all night drinking it , but for thirst quenching as you get off the bike after a hard day, its the stuff for me. It also comes in 1 litre bottles. Oh, and beer is often cheaper than bottled water. If you needed another excuse. Sold in corner shops too, and they often have it in the chiller cabinet - in the supermarket, it is usually stacked on pallets or in stilages.
    No apparent restrictions, other than to "mineurs" which could be 16. I would probably have fingers left over if I counted up the incidents of ott drunkenness collected over a 40 year period - and that counts some pretty big celebrations.
    So there you go, how I do healthiness on tour. A month to 6 weeks at a time, for the last 25 years or so.
    #49
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  10. Ohio_Danimal

    Ohio_Danimal If I die trying, at least I tried

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    OP asked for healthy road meal ideas though, not just generalizations of eating patterns.
    I'm 56 and have greatly altered the types and amounts of foods I eat in order to lose weight/drop cholesterol levels/blood pressure. And it works.
    Like I said earlier, I've even learned to enjoy the nearly daily search for fresh meat and veggies for that day's main meal.
    #50
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  11. banjobart

    banjobart Been here awhile

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    Pork rinds, if there is no meat or bacon. Cheetos are a decent substitute.
    #51
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  12. sparkingdogg

    sparkingdogg Prisoner In Disguise

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    Normal food such as tuna packs and rice pouches. Backpacking food, dehydrated stuff sometimes. Clif bars. Occasional MRE. Every third day or so I get a 12" Subway loaded up with all the veggies that fit.

    Zero McD or BK.

    Let me repeat, zero McDonald's or Burger King. None. Nada. Never. :deal
    #52
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  13. High Country Herb

    High Country Herb Adventure Connoiseur

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    I came back to check on this thread, and this photo made me instantly hungry. Man, that looks good!
    #53
  14. AKSapper300

    AKSapper300 Adventurer

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    Lunch or supper, if eating in a diner/restaurant I always look for the Cobb salad. Every food group, get the dressing on the side so's you don't eat all of it.
    #54
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  15. Smashy

    Smashy Been here awhile

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    You could just not eat. On day rides, I skip breakfast and I don't eat anything until I return home. On multi-day rides I'll eat one meal at the end of the day. Look up intermittent fasting, it's actually healthy for you. Plus if you don't eat, you won't get as thirsty, and you won't have to take bathroom breaks as often.
    #55
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  16. Boricua

    Boricua Been here awhile

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    Perfectly sculpted diet eating the same every week?

    That is the saddest story I ever heard

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    #56
  17. Boricua

    Boricua Been here awhile

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    For camping I make my own instant oatmeal packets. The only drawback is using 1 min quick oats. Measured portion of oats, powdered non fat milk, dried cranberries or raisins. Random sliced nuts or a simple granola mix. Makes for a hearty breakfast. When away of civilization lunch is a single serving packed of tuna, plain or deli, a flour tortilla, they travel better than corn tortillas, a snack size Ziploc bag full of dried fruits and nuts and a plain granola bar. That's a solid 600 - 700 cal lunch that tastes good and fit in a quart ziploc bag. I've been experimenting with my dehydrator. So far rice and beans work well, Im Puerto Rican so think Louisiana red beans and rice but better. Most vegetable dishes also work like tajine without the animal protein or a eggplant based italian style tomato sauce with pasta. Its a lot of carbs.
    However, I alternate my riding days with a long hiking days so its not too bad for me. I replace the animal fat with vegetable fats in my dehydrator meals. Like animal fat they don't dehydrate but don't go rancid as quickly.

    When in civilization I go where to locals go and order what the locals order. In between civilization and the wild the gas station subway is my friend.

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    #57
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  18. Trailrider200

    Trailrider200 Been here awhile

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    be careful with whole wheat. one slice of whole wheat raises blood sugar level more than a candy bar does. also due to the opiate in wheat one will eat approx 400 cals more per day
    http://www.wheatbellyblog.com/2012/04/wheat-is-an-opiate/
    #58
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  19. eakins

    eakins Butler Maps

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    Sure is better than the white bread options. Like I said, I'll choose a salad when available but sometimes Subway & some crap burger joint is the only place to get food out west in these small towns. There might be a local "cafe" but that's often even worse. Ideally I'll find a great vegetarian restaurant but those are far and few between. For breakfast I'd have steel cut whole oats with fruit and nuts every morning, but that can be hard to find too. In the end I always carry apples and other fruit in my tank bag plus some Lara bars.
    #59
  20. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

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    I never eat fast food and almost all prepared foods contain large amounts of stuff your doctor would not approve of.
    A simple stir fry is east to supply, prepare and cook. You can easily manage without oils and soy and oyster sauce or whatever people put in them - mostly unhealthy shit anyway, like lashings of monosodium glutamate. On the road, I can use water.
    I guess you could always prep up a small bottle of your favourite stir fry condiment for a trip.

    I made a stir fry tonight, admittedly at home. The only thing I bought was some bean sprouts, because I really like them and they don't keep well.

    I think supermarkets sell ready chopped stir fry mix in several flavours.

    Tonight I used a carrot - sliced very thin, red and green onion, fresh ginger - julienne, a couple of chillies - sliced, a capsicum - fine strips, a few Brussel sprouts - fine slices, a stick of celery - fine slices and some left over chicken - torn bite size. Nothing I could not have bought from any filling station shop here. A dash of mirin and the juice of a good half a lime. We normally eat that with rice.
    On the road, I would have cooked the rice first and set to rest while cooking the veg. I could have done noodles, but they really need to be ready at the same time. With only one burner, you need to judge when to fiddle with the stuff to avoid half a cold meal.
    I have never tried potato, but most veg can be used, you just cut it up so it will cook within the time frame. I often use a veg peeler, works very well on carrot and courgette.
    [​IMG]
    Lightweight racing model - hand guided for extra satisfaction in use, perimeter aluminium chassis and carbon steel fixed throat blade guide - ask for Rex.


    A few beers in a bucket of cold water... essential.

    Tomorrow, the last of the chicken goes into a Balinese chicken curry.
    #60