What to eat on the road that is relatively healthy?

Discussion in 'Trip Planning' started by scorch, Jun 23, 2016.

  1. Use2btrix

    Use2btrix Been here awhile

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    The government is about the last place I would trust any nutritional info from lol. They have reversed their views on things as simple as fat benefits to a diet as recently as the last decade, and they are still changing their mind on things. Not to mention the pisspoor excuse of regulation of additives in our foods, the growing processes of our fruits and vegetables, and the livestock practices throughout our country.

    That aside, protein needs for individuals is based on a ton of different factors. The average American tends to be fat/obese and inactive. In addition to not as much protein, these people need less food in general. I can promise you, the United States is not towards the top of the worlds obesity list because of "eating too much meat and drinking too many protein shakes." It's due to eating too much processed foods, sugar, and simple carbohydrates. We're not a population that's getting fat over too much chicken and rice.

    Someone would be 1000x better off eating too many protein calories than simple carbohydrate calories. Simple carbohydrates cause enormous spikes in blood sugar and insulin release and cause the excess calories to be more easily stored as fat. At the very least, the person won't be as susceptible to diabetes.

    I don't even want to give out an "average" number macronutrient needs for an American because it's far too case dependent. Most people need to be more concerned with their calories before even really thinking about what their protein/carb/fat ratios should be.

    Personally, I am 5'10, 205lbs and about 10-12% body fat. To maintain this I eat approx 3200 calories per day consisting of about 320g protein, 240g carbs, and 130g fat. I adjust these numbers as trial and error to see what works best for me, and have been for the last 5 years or so. Each of my meals is weighed on a scale and planned accordingly (nowadays all courtesy of my amazing wife who is 120lbs but can probably outsquat the majority of this forum lol). My fitness regime is also quite a more intense than most, and my 13+ years weightlifting has put on enough muscle that my body utilizes these calories, in addition the the added BCAA's I take that aid in processing the protein as well.


    I know this is much more of a response than is needed or anyone is looking for, but if anyone can take away a few things about nutrition, then it was worthwhile :)
    #81
  2. SnoWing

    SnoWing Adventurer

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    I agree ALL of what your saying, in your case. But 99.9% of people have no workout regime at all.
    Look at it this way, your driving your car to a gas station and the attendant comes, you say, filler up with bolts and nails, that's what people do when they're eating high protein meals, and it just gets heavier, but no energy. But if you add the metal to produce a stronger engine, and fill up gas as well, then you become 5'10" and 205 lbs. you are very disciplined and know what needs to be done. What happens if a person in your case suddenly gets hurt or something... it's easy to stop working out, but not so easy to stop eating habits. Anyway, not in it for arguments, I am 5'11" and 178lbs, I was just about 250lbs, and don't really work out now. I walk an hour a day. I know that by eating right, one can be healthy. This is only a suggestion for people like me.
    #82
  3. AviatorTroy

    AviatorTroy Long timer

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    Gotta agree with that. This thread was about eating healthy, not working out anyway. I personally am not much of an excercizer. I do like to go hiking at least once a week and do yoga a couple times a week, but a far as going to the gym and doing my cardio and weights, that stuff is just not for me. A few years ago my doctor flat out told me if you want to lose weight, it's 1/5 working out and 4/5th diet. Well even I can do that math. I just started eating fruits and vegetables for 2 of my 3 meals a day, and stopped eating cheeseburgers and Mexican food 5 nights a week. Over the last year I've lost about 40 pounds and feel better then ever. So as for on the road...

    I'm a pilot and am on the road constantly. It's a real challenge to try to stay healthy. At hotels I hit the breakfast buffet and eat a huge pile of fruit, with some non fat yougurt and either a hard boiled egg or a small amount of granola.

    Lunch must be a salad of some kind. No fast food with one exception, Wendy's has some great salads as long as you lay off the dressing.

    Dinner is a normal American style dinner except that I take a knife and cut it down the middle, eat half, and that's it.

    Hardly ever drink a soda, and if I do it's diet something. No Gatorade, there is an unglodly amount of sugar in it. I do drink coffee like it's going out of style, but only black, no sugar or fattening creamer. Something that is thirst quenching that one of my flight attendents put me onto a while ago, she would squeeze a lemon slice and a packet of Stevia into a water bottle, it's just sweet and tart enough to be interesting but still zero calories and maybe even a few electrolytes.

    Just my thoughts, it's not easy.
    #83
  4. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

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    Regular exercise stimulates your metabolism and the body just works through your intake better, like rust or a mortgage, it never sleeps.
    I was told a slice of bread has enough calories to walk 20 miles, so burning calories alone isn't doing it, the metabolism working away all the time is what counts.

    Best exercise regime I ever had was when I was in Germany and going to the Kieser Training gym. All "calibrated for you" machines, no free weights. A qualified (one year course) instructor talks you through your issues and works out a plan. Next session they work round the 8 to 10 machines they select for your needs and sets the calibration and makes sure you know how, and for how long, you do each exercise.
    The focus of my training was the long term neck and back problems that doctors had failed to alleviate, but there was an element of other training too.

    Every so often you get an invite to the gym Dr, for a medical, discuss progress and any changes or modifications needed. You can of course have a word with the instructors at any time, and they will be keeping and eye to make sure you are doing it right and safe.
    Everyone has a chart which you fill out at each machine, each time, so progress can be assessed, and changes, if necessary, introduced.
    Many attendees are referrals from accidents (workplace or auto) by their insurance company as part of a holistic recuperation package.
    Anyone wanting a more aerobic regime is encouraged to do more walking.

    One of the things I really like was the no mirrors, no soundtrack or video, no juice or burgerbar, lots of water, freely available. No scimpies or scanties clothing wise either.

    Once your "probation" is done, my session would take about 40 minutes and I would be floating. A real endophine rush, from much less "work" than the couple of regular gyms I have ever been to.
    I think the programmes are worked so people can do them in their break or on the way to or from work without screwing up the day. Again compared to the other gyms, the change & shower facilities are simple, clean and sweat smell free.
    #84
  5. SnoWing

    SnoWing Adventurer

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    I like your stevia lemon water drink recipe. I use stevia occasionally also, and I believe stevia is a good ingredient, there are however artificial sweeteners that are zero calories in itself that can cause a lot of damage. Because sweet is sweet. The key is understanding your system, let's say you eat a cookie sweetened with artificial sweeteners, what happens inside your body? Our bodies are a work of miracles, all our organs communicate to each other the series of events taking place during a meal. I.e. The artificially sweetened cookie. Cookie goes in mouth, #1 the tongue analyses it for flavor (taste) it sends a message to the pancreas, "prepare insulin, sugar is coming" but the cookie has no sugar, well, that's odd, what happens to the insulin? It gets stored as, you guessed it, fat. This happens a number of times, and guess what happens to your pancreas? It stops making insulin! Which is ok if you continue drinking/eating artificially sweetened foods only. But now it's your birthday, or another special occasion, and there has been prepared a special desert in your honor, sweetened with sugar, and because it is in your honor, you have to have 2 pieces. What is happening with the sugar? Your pancreas is not preparing insulin to deal with the sugar, so now the sugar turns into fat, so I will rather stay away from artificial sweeteners, and have my pancreas do what it was designed to do, and limit the sugar intake. Please share, if the truth can be known, it can be an incredible asset, the only problem with a healthy lifestyle is, you will put Doctors out of work. I could write so much more about this stuff.
    But I'd probably get myself into trouble....
    #85
  6. Use2btrix

    Use2btrix Been here awhile

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    My post had virtually nothing to do with exercise other than a small bit about myself.

    Your doctor was right, losing weight had virtually nothing to do with exercise. If all you care about is the number on the scale, it also has little to nothing to do with WHAT you eat. 2000 calories of ice cream will effect the number on the scale the same amount as chicken and rice.

    Where protein, carbs, and fat come into play is how much energy you want to have, how much muscle you want to retain, and how you feel overall.

    All that fruit you're eating is packed with sugar. Sugar is sugar, whether it comes from honey or fruit or the granular sugar you get in a bag. It all spikes your blood sugar then sends it crashing down. While fruit had some great nutrients, it should not compose entire meals. Complex carbohydrates such as oatmeal, potatos, or brown rice, will be far more generous to your blood sugar levels as well as keeping you full longer, without the blood sugar crash.

    Protein is a staple to build and retain muscle, period. That's part of the reason people are "skinny fat" is due to a lack of balanced diet. Sure, they're skinny, but they're also soft and flabby. If I never exercised again in my life, I would aim for a diet balanced between protein, fat, and complex carbs. The average American probably eats 70% of their calories in carbohydrates when it should be more like 30%.

    Anyways, because I work out more it seems that my nutritional info somehow doesn't apply. If you look at all those skinny people in National Geographic you'd know there's no science to not being fat. It's simply stop eating so much garbage. If you want to be concerned about your overall health and wellness beyond the number on the scale, a little research would show how getting a good balance and eating the right calories will be just as effective in different measures as just eating less calories.
    #86
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  7. triguye

    triguye n00b

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    I like to stop at local farmer's stands. A couple pieces of fruit are great when hunger pangs start. Although fruit contains sugar, they also contain antioxidants, fiber, and vitamins. And by volume they contain much less sugar than a similar sized cookie or a similar sized sweet.
    #87
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  8. jordan325ic

    jordan325ic Been here awhile

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    I made a small metal cage against the exhaust header. I chop up vegtables, add a little bit of olive oil and seasoning, wrap in three layers of tin-foil and then cook it against the exhaust. Zuchinni and squash are quick, I rotate twice in 30km and it's ready. Root vegetables like potato will take maybe 100km, rotating twice. You can get fancy if you want. I use this setup in places where I can't afford to eat out (Europe) or places where there simply isn't anything to eat (Sahara).
    #88
  9. strykerpro

    strykerpro Git R Dun

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    Beer... that is all...
    #89
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  10. Tall Man

    Tall Man Priest, Temple of Syrinx

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    Do you have a photo of the cage config? This is something that I've wanted to experiment with for some time, but I've not yet planned the proper construction. Thanks.
    #90
  11. jordan325ic

    jordan325ic Been here awhile

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    It didn't work well in cold temperatures. It was also a little bit messy... a bit of oil/juice would always get onto my right boot and the exhaust/engine. I forgot to take pictures, it wasn't much to look at. Just some stiff wire, a few bits of keychain and a piece of perforated scrap metal. I experimented with other locations on the bike but really the header was the best. Here's the best picture I could find.

    [​IMG]P8060072 by Jordan Jones, on Flickr
    #91
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  12. Maggot12

    Maggot12 U'mmmm yeaah!!

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    There are cooking cans specifically made for exhaust pipes to heat food. Your fav online shopping plaza should have it in stock. Very common with snowmobilers.

    #92
  13. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

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    Went out yesterday along the coast and up here in the North Sea the crabs are starting to get active. A few stalls alongside the road had dressed crab on offer, so no effort on our part other than eating.
    The deli had stopped their mussels I noticed, but did still have oysters. If you can be arsed, then mussels are very easy to find, harvest and cook in coolish waters.
    Clean and remove the beard. Discard any which don't close if tapped. Heat a lidded pan - white wine, water and white vinegar, beer or just the water, only a bit - you need the steam, not a bath.
    Add any aromats available, bay leaf, thyme parsley stalks. For Moule Mariniere, there should be a mirepoix, a mix of finely chopped leek, onion and carrot, however...
    Once boiling, drop the mussles in and close the lid. Shake a couple of times while cooking for a minute or two - until the mussels open. Season. Then they're done. Discard any which didn't open.
    Eat with fresh bread, preferably really good bread. Oh and beer will make an good accompaniment too, if you couldn't get wine.
    I think the northwest European habit of having some Belgian style frites along side is a bit much to expect.

    If you are riding adjacent to seas or rivers, there is likely to be fishy stuff available. If not full of heavy metals or radioactivity, very healthy. Often available free for the effort of foraging - at least you will know it is fresh.
    #93
  14. BvilleBud

    BvilleBud Been here awhile

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    Thought I'd chime in. I'm ashamed to say that I got WAY too fat. I'm 80 down from my biggest and 40+ down from January. Even 7-11 and Sheets have bags of carrots & celery in a pinch; that and a pack of natural almonds or a chunk of cheese and I can make it another 4-5 hours down the road. I am used to just getting chicken Caesar salad and you can get one of those just about anywhere (even Cracker Barrel). I have gotten to the point where I don't let circumstances cause me to make bad choices. Like others have said farmers markets are a great resource. A grocery store is always better than the twin arches (and not much slower) and there is one in every town. Sardines (in water or olive oil) always along for the ride.
    #94
  15. Boricua

    Boricua Been here awhile

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    One healthy way to eat whatever you want. Park the bike at trailhead hike a mile to a nice spot on the trail. Eat whatever you can carry. Hike a mile back to the bike. That is a 15 min lunch served with 40 min of walking. If the trail is uphill you might be able to splurge with an extra piece of fruit on the way back.

    Sent from my XT1635-01 using Tapatalk
    #95
  16. Maggot12

    Maggot12 U'mmmm yeaah!!

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    Does anybody really make time for that...

    #96
  17. motojo

    motojo Been here awhile

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    I just basically live on coffee, yogurt, granola, salad or a heathy homemade dinner when at home. On the road I add tuna to my dinner salad or boil a potato. Lots of nuts, apples and water also. My wife makes my granola and it is fantastic. I eat far to much of it but now I'm 5'10, 155# down from 205# 5 years ago. Stopping drinking 10 beers a day helps too. [​IMG]
    #97
  18. Andsetinn

    Andsetinn Adventurer

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    Many good ideas here. For me it depends on where I am and how long the trip is. For very short trips I just eat junk-ish food. For longer trips I take more care.
    In Scandinavia Dried Cod is very healthy and will last for months in resealable bag (sort of fish jerky without the spices, version of stockfish). Subway does get a plus from me as do farmers markets, fresh tomatoes in Italy are very, very good. Raisins are good for snack although not the chocolate covered ones.
    If I stay at hotels I like bacon and eggs plus coffee for breakfast but unfortunately it is not the healthiest option. :)
    Water is the best thing you can get for drinking, supermarket water is way cheaper than at gas stations.
    Google maps is great for finding supermarkets and restaurants close by, you can specify what types of restaurants, and you can read the reviews to get an idea for the food and the quality.
    What I avoid on longer trips: Tuna (7 Tuna species are on list of endangered species, more than whales), KFC, McDonalds, Burger King, energy bars and energy drinks (Coca Cola and Mars bar is healthier than many energy bars and drinks).
    #98
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  19. Tall Man

    Tall Man Priest, Temple of Syrinx

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    When at hotels, and breakfast is provided, my habit is to start the day with yogurt, juice and/or black tea, and a small bowl of raisin bran...and I usually pocket an apple and banana for a road snack. The "eggs" are usually some form of food service-grade reconstituted powder, so, no thanks. If I'm carrying a hydration pack, I'll refill it by taking a bottle or three of water from the breakfast bar.

    My lunches usually incorporate a salad, and/or a sandwich. Tuna is a recurring choice for me. I've consumed it since I was a wee lad and I've no intention of trimming it from my diet. At dinner, I'll seek out a restaurant and have a full and tasty meal; baked fish and two sides are a perennial favorite. Otherwise, I try for veal or chicken. Nothing fried. I usually don't order dessert, but I will drink a Coke or two during the meal.
    #99
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  20. Nightengale

    Nightengale Adventurer

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    I'm a food company in the real world (when I'm not screwing around online or out doing something fun) and have spent too much time studying this topic. I pack dried food and dried / fresh fruit, nuts, pumpkin seeds, hemp, coffee, crackers, nut bars, etc., and visit the supermarkets when traveling to supplement my own stash. It's pretty easy to pick out 'healthy' if you avoid all pre-packaged foods and most restaurants, but admittedly, I'll cheat and splurge. Sometimes that is the reason I've 'arrived' - to try out the local cuisine. Otherwise, I don't have any desire to be in any city or town.

    The vegetable section in any store is your friend. Canned supermarket food and pre-packaged food is unfit to eat in most forms (toxic to the human body), so I avoid that. There are some exceptions - pickles, olives, anything pickled (except meat), and of course, vegetables. It can actually be a fun part of the experience of traveling to work out what you want to eat that is healthy and locally available. Farmers markets (if open) are a great source of fresh food too.

    The tips on the hotel buffets is pretty good - I grab a handful of fruit to help me out during the rest of the waking hours. I've never had any of the hotel staff say anything. You can also load up on the healthier choices while there, they offer things like oatmeal which with fresh fruit, is about as good as it gets.

    You can always try pre-preparing your food before your trip. That will help immensely on food costs too. There is also thermos cooking which will cook your food while you're riding around. Toss in your ingredients (anything) and add boiling water. Open in about 3 or 4 hours and eat.

    I also carry my own spices, but not a huge selection. This can definitely help make bland tasting foods more enjoyable.

    If you do eat out, you can generally order whatever you want. I'm not afraid to ask how it's prepared, what it contains, what kind of oil is used and so on since I know it matters. Some restaurants are pretty good at being really helpful, others not so much.
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