What to eat on the road that is relatively healthy?

Discussion in 'Trip Planning' started by scorch, Jun 23, 2016.

  1. Nightengale

    Nightengale Been here awhile

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    I recommend the Netflix documentary, "What the Health" (2017) for tips on eating healthy (wherever you are). There has been a lot of progress in this field. Watch this all the way through if you are truly interested in how food affects life.
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  2. markbvt

    markbvt Long timer

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    Interesting thread.

    For me it depends largely on length and location of the trip. If it's just a week in more populated areas, I usually won't bother to do any cooking in camp, just grab breakfast en route (usually a diner or similar; I avoid fast food unless there are no other options). Assuming I've had a good breakfast, I typically skip lunch, then get dinner at a decent restaurant near wherever I'm setting up camp for the night. I like good food, so I tend to look for local places whose owners take the quality of their business personally, not chain restaurants.

    On longer trips, especially ones in more remote areas, my friends and I will do a fair amount of cooking in camp. Usually the way this works is that sometime during the day, we'll stop at a grocery store en route and pick up supplies for dinner that night and breakfast the next morning. Some days this may just end up being some cans of beef stew and bags of precooked rice or similar; other days we'll cook a fairly elaborate meal in camp using ingredients we've picked up that day. Newfoundland is great for this because it's easy to get super-fresh fish.

    Here's one of the more elaborate camp meals, using fresh cod. We had two stoves going and a variety of local ingredients, including Newfoundland's own Screech rum.
    [​IMG]

    Here are ingredients prepped for a similar dinner on a more recent trip.
    [​IMG]

    My friend David cooking the bacon for breakfast the next morning.
    [​IMG]

    David had packed along that griddle and a compact camp stove; I brought a small hard-anodized aluminum commercial skillet and another camp stove. And our friend Mark brought a Jetboil. So the three of us working together could whip up a pretty good meal. In this case we'd picked up ingredients the day before for dinner and for this morning's breakfast. Tip: instead of trying to transport a dozen eggs without breaking them, crack them into a Nalgene bottle, throw away the carton and shells, and stow the Nalgene bottle. Next morning, just pour them into a hot pan; convenient scrambled eggs.

    Cooking fresh food in camp is a little more work, but it's much tastier, it's healthier, and it's actually kind of fun.

    --mark
  3. lopaca

    lopaca Been here awhile

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    For lunch, if you are in the middle of nowhere like when we did the Trans America Trail years ago, we stocked up on tins of sardines packed in oil and one serving packaged almonds. A bottle of water and we were good to dinner. One tip, pack each sardine can in its own zip lock with a spork and one of those sealed packages of moist wipes. Then when you are done you put everything back into the ziplock and you won't have sardine oil all over your pack or tank bag. Simply put the spork into the next bag and your ready to go. I was doubtful at first but this really worked for all of us. Hope that helps.
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  4. AustinRT

    AustinRT Been here awhile

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    add into mix tins of smoked oysters. can now get spicy. haven't figured out how to carry crackers though. they take up space and are fragile. Grocery stores hardly stock the single tube boxes or the charge as much as a 4 tube box. bread is better if you can find boletos or other small fresh baked lofts. the oil from sardine or oysters is great for dipping.
  5. Dealsdunia

    Dealsdunia n00b

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    Food which is lighter in fat such as fruit vegetable in once fast in a day will keep you running. As diet is one of the most important things which you have to keep in Mind while roaming outside. Bad food will leave your journey literally miserable.
  6. George Hanson

    George Hanson Been here awhile

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    What about that boxed couscous stuff? Pasta?
  7. Nightengale

    Nightengale Been here awhile

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    Read the ingredients for contents, additives, preservatives (whatever you buy). Cous cous is pretty good, usually. I definitely like it, same with pasta. Can be used with nearly anything.

    There's a statistic that everyone should be aware of - there are now more cancers then first baby births and more cancers then marriages (United Kingdom study). Most of this is diet / environmentally related. What you eat matters - a lot. But the majority of what is being sold for people to eat is largely toxic.

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/2017/07/09/cancer-now-common-getting-married-having-first-baby/
  8. sajor

    sajor Been here awhile

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    If you go to the ultra light backacking forums (reddit has a good one ) youll get great tips on eating on the road or trail , another good option is to hydrate your home cooked food, when your at camp or road all you have to do is add water wait a lil and fresh home made food is served, its literally ultra light as well to carry.
  9. 97707

    97707 Go Long

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    Even a small town grocery store will usually have these items. In town, I'll buy some bagged salad and a pack of steaks. Those get eaten same day, before they can go bad.

    Second or third day out, I've been doing something like this:

    IMG_1822.JPG

    That rice is cooked and needs no refrigeration. Says no preservatives, so not sure how they do that. 'Course you could sub salmon, chicken, shrimp . . . any canned meat. That's less than $6 for two meals there, so cheap too. I don't use cans at home or backpacking, but this is convenient on the bike. Just mix it in a pan and warm it up.

    IMG_1818.JPG

    I like my salad. It don't travel well compressed in the side bags, so I carry that in the backpack and use it right away. Same with fruit. Drizzle a bit of olive oil and fresh lime on that salad, a sprinkle of salt, and eat it right out of the bag.

    IMG_1820.JPG


    Mmm.

    .
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  10. IdahoMtnRider

    IdahoMtnRider n00b

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    Local grocery chain (WinCo) sells individual MRE items. The entrees are pretty tasty and the form factor (foil pouch approx. 4" x 6" x 0.5") is easy to pack on the bike. Instead carrying a bunch of the self heaters, I just heat water with my camp stove and drop the pouch in to warm it up. Eat right out of the package, zero clean up and trash is easier to pack out than empty cans. Individual items range from a $1 to $1.50 so pretty economical eats.
  11. 97707

    97707 Go Long

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    That's some pretty fancy camp cookery. You guys are invited on my next trip for sure.

    .
  12. No False Enthusiasm

    No False Enthusiasm a quiet adventurer

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    At noon, I usually pull over to an interesting place and feast on an apple and lightly salted mixed nuts. A can of sparkling water washes it down, and I normally have a container of yogurt for dessert.

    NFE
  13. Tall Man

    Tall Man Priest, Temple of Syrinx

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    A local hardware store has a small camping section, in which they sell what I thought were reasonably priced MREs: $5 or $6. A closer look revealed that this was the price for just the single entree component (pouch). I'm still able to purchase non-expired, gov-issue MREs -- the whole thing, sealed, with heaters -- at gun shows for $6 or so, so the hardware store and their prices can go hang.


    Sans the yogurt, what you mention is my exact snack pack for rest stops during long riding days.
  14. snglfin

    snglfin man on a mission

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