What would you put in "Crashbar Bags"?

Discussion in 'Crazy-Awesome almost Dakar racers (950/990cc)' started by Bugman98, Apr 25, 2012.

  1. Bugman98

    Bugman98 Been here awhile

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    I've seen the little bags made to fit within the trapezoidal space of the crash bars on 950-990s. It turns out that I have some small bicycle panniers that will fit in that space perfectly and was thinking of using them for an upcoming trip this summer. But I really can't think of good things to keep there! Whatever I put in there will probably get squished, crushed, punctured (when I drop the bike in the dirt at some point) wet and muddy. Anything that could inadvertently crack or puncture the gas tanks (when the bike falls over) is out too.

    What do people put in these things? Am I being paranoid about the tank being punctured? Am I lacking creativity when it comes to packing? Should I just forget the whole thing? :eek1
    #1
  2. BaronVonDarrin

    BaronVonDarrin Been here awhile

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    I was thinking of picking these up too. I planned on putting wrenches, sockets, zipties, etc in them really. I reckon they wont puncture a tank
    #2
  3. dave54

    dave54 mindless thoughts

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    spare tubes,gloves,rain gear,bike cover,waterproof maps,food,extra water are the kind of things that spring to mind.
    #3
  4. cjracer

    cjracer AWD please!!

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    I have all my WARN WINCH recovery gear in there. Easy for anyone on the trip to get to and always on the bike.

    The Small "A990" bag on the crash bars are what we are talking about for new comers.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    #4
  5. viola-tor

    viola-tor Needs to ride!

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    Bugman and I have actually been having this discussion for a while! And I certainly see where he's coming from (and probably added to his paranoia! :D You're welcome buddy. :freaky).

    Items that I view as "survival gear" sure aren't going in there, for me anyway. That includes tubes, tools, rain-gear, and water from the above list. A pavement/gravel slide or even an unplanned meeting with a cactus could take out those items in a hurry, or render them useless (thorns in tubes and water). Get up, dust yourself off, bike doesn't look too bad, can tighten this, bend that... Now where ARE my tools? Back there in the dust somewhere?!?! I've been WAY too close to running out of water and/or tubes in the desert too many times. That stuff needs to be packed away safe and secure IMO, it really can turn out to be the difference between a long day and hazardous-to-your-health experience.

    Clothes and sleeping gear, seems obvious, but then there's the thorns again, and waterproofing. Cactus spines in my sleeping bag?! No thanks. I suppose clothes in a big ziplock would be fine, but my clothes don't actually take up that much room in the saddle bags.

    About the only thing I can come up with is extra shoes/footwear, which can eat up huge amounts of motorcycle storage capacity. And don't need fancy bags for that! Just wrap 'em in a garbage back and strap them on! :evil I doubt my hiking boots would fit in the crashbar bags anyway, but I'm curious now...

    I'm curious to see what everyone else says! Esp, guys that have used these crash bar bags extensively.

    Maybe I'm paranoid too... :huh
    #5
  6. drued

    drued Adventurer

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    I carry jumper cables, tie downs and rope, tire irons, tube patch kit along with spare tubes and pump. I have had to replace two of the velcro tabs after a fall. There was no other damage to the bags or the contents and the bags did not fall off. If I hadn't looked closely, the broken velcro tabs would have been overlooked because the bags were still attached.
    #6
  7. dave54

    dave54 mindless thoughts

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    Viola-tor is probably right ! his boots wont`t fit in those crash bar bags lol.I also agree that careful consideration should be given to placement of items if survival in desert and or other extreme conditions is your priority.I`ve used bags attached to a tank bag before but found the whole deal too bulky and basically in the way for any real gain or benefit.I`ve interested in looking at tank panniershttp://www.steelpony.com.au/simpson tank panniers.htm andhttp://www.andystrapz.com/products-details.php?productId=133&productCategoryId=22&Level=1 which would be suitable for 4 week 10,000k trips that I do most years. I`m hoping to get a set of safari tanks ,new custom long distance seathttp://rayz.nl/ new cockpit new lighting system .Come to think of it I`ve never stopped buying for this bike.Bags! why hell I`ll take two.
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  8. Bugman98

    Bugman98 Been here awhile

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    I suppose the key to not getting cactus thorn punctures in the contents of the bags would be to not run into any cactuses???:deal I don't think my size 12 shoes would fit in the bag either, but my wife's shoes would. Oh, lord I hope she doesn't find out that there are even more places she can put shoes when on a moto trip!

    I like the idea of rope and jumper cables. I think I saw a thread about a guy who carries 100 feet of rope and a bunch of pulleys that he can make his own come along with. I can see how that would be useful...
    #8
  9. PS-RagE

    PS-RagE Been here awhile

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    I normally have these strapped on all the time and I keep CJ's highway pegs and a wrench in one side and a pile of ROK straps in the other. Still have lots of room to spare for miscellaneous crap. I did learn not to put cans of soda in there however ....
    #9
  10. Questor

    Questor More Undestructable

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    Thinking of all the potential for holes, punctures, abrasion, and catcus...
    I guess this is a bad place to put, air mattress, spare tubes or condoms. :lol3

    But seriously, I'd put a rope / tow strap in there, perhaps a plastic drop cloth, but not much else... Nothing solid or pointy.

    They are neat, but I agree with other posts, it's a terrible place to put anything valuable or fragile.

    Q~
    #10
  11. viola-tor

    viola-tor Needs to ride!

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    Rope, straps, jumper cables: Those are good ideas!

    Now CJ's cool tool tube - that's cool. It's low and inside, unlikely to get damaged and it looks cavernous!

    My tool tube has worked out pretty well, but it's a hassle to get in and out of. But I do keep "emergency" tools and stuff in there, WP kit, electric repair stuff, things like that.

    I see from the pic info that I built them in '08, so I'd say they've held up pretty damn well!

    [​IMG]
    #11
  12. PilotBoy99

    PilotBoy99 Adventurer

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    Rain suit, bike cover and jacket/pants liner.
    #12
  13. biggus

    biggus Been here awhile

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    Pillows for when the big one takes naps...:lol3 :lol3 :lol3
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  14. dad2bike

    dad2bike Cranky Old Fart

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    Generally I keep soft items in there that would take up a bunch of room in the tank bag. Tow strap, bungees, extra power/audio cables, baggie with gloves.
    #14
  15. MotoTex

    MotoTex Miles of Smiles

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    CJ,

    Have you considered what will you do if/when* your AWD "Troop Transport" falls downhill onto the side the recovery gear needed to right the bike is located? :eek1

    *never underestimate the resourcefulness of Murphy. :deal

    I recently read the thread of the guy with the rope, carabiners and pulleys to make a block and tackle and he mentioned always packing the recovery gear in the top box, else the bike will inevitably end up on top of the gear you need to extract it.
    #15
  16. CRW

    CRW I dont want a pickle

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    Just a thought here guys.
    You could cut thin plastic from those flimsy roll up cutting boards to make a protective barrier(for the in side of the bag) that a cactus most likely wouldn't puncture. Imagine the amount of condoms and tire lube you could carry. You could almost make it like a tool roll(forming board) for certain tools to create even more protection.
    I have always been intrigued by these bags but aint got no crash bars.:D
    #16
  17. Namecheck

    Namecheck Like a Sir!

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    Dude, that bike is friggin bad-ASS!
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  18. MotoTex

    MotoTex Miles of Smiles

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    and it has Front Wheel Drive too.
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  19. cjracer

    cjracer AWD please!!

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    Sure I have, but to this day, none of my crashes or "stucks" have limited me from getting the bike back on 2 wheels. I travel solo a lot and if I pack to the point I can't pick the bike up. It's too much and it's deemed not needed. I can pick it up packed, and if I couldn't after a trip/crash off trail I would most likely have more issues than getting the bike out.

    If I can't get it upright- unload it more.

    I raced a Hair Scramble a few years back. A 950 in the woods amongst 250 and 300s. :rofl

    I crashed on a down hill/ off camber section. Bike flipped tires up hill to the sky..... Bikes passing me looking like a Semi had rolled over.

    Scratches be damned, I had to get moving again. I spun the bike around 180, tires down hill. Bike was at about a 45 degree angle against the hill. I picked it up from there.

    The contents in these bags might be sacrificed in that situation, I agree. But so far my Crash testing with my current items in the bags as they are now has shown no damage to them. This was a crash test down a rock stair case in Moab. I don't recommend repeating it to verify.

    Every riding area has it's packing issues and concerns. We don't have catus in Wisconsin. We have trees, roots, mud, and sand. I enjoy traveling to new areas, learning new skills and how my setup back home works in other areas.

    The AWD is awesome and has made my own personal use the winch go down greatly in the last few seasons, but just as I do in my 4wd Trucks.

    1wd first,
    2wd when that's not enough....

    WARN Winch when nothing else will do.


    Here is my personal take on the HUMAN powered ropes and "biner" systems VS Winch system. Either one is better than nothing!

    Pluses:
    -They are or can be very light weight.
    -cost less.
    -can be easier to use in the proper situation.

    Minus:
    -Solo use might be iffy getting a bike up a climb.
    (you need to hold the bike on it's wheels to roll the easiest, then pull on rope system. Better left to 2 or 3 rider group.
    - (Space) Rope depending on how much is needed can take up as much room as my current winch setup.

    Winch system-

    Pluses:
    -You could get heavier items out of a bad situation will less effort SOLO.
    (What if you are too tired to Pull and can't, We've found at the end of the day. Even if it takes longer the get the WINCH out and rigged, it was still safer than getting stuck or injure ourselves pushing. Slow and Steady.)
    -Once wired to the bike, I use this as a jump start point for other bikes.
    -You gets lot of power in a 10lb package.

    Minus:
    -Cost
    (It's hard to swallow a $600 price tag, but I find if you are riding in an area that requires bike extraction in any manner, it pays for its self the first use.)

    If you ride with groups regularly. Everyone pitch in and have every Bike wired with a POWER lead. For larger groups this might be about $60 per bike rider. Get the "Controls on Winch" version and now anyone can use it at anytime from bike to bike.

    -The perceived bulk and weight.
    - NO power, NO pull. Good electrical system and wiring is a must.

    I am always open to new ideas and trail product uses.

    For my use and application in SOLO travel, the WARN Winch setup works better for me.

    PLEASE, if you run into me on the trail and we have time. I'd like to see a Human power rope system layout compared to the Winch Layout system.

    If anything needs to be covered more, I'll do my best to explain how I use my setups. I'm no pro, but being comfortable traveling and exploring on your bike takes time to get "your" setup dialed.
    :ear

    Here is a ride report so you can see the kind of trails we travel on in Wisconsin.

    Safe travels,
    cj
    #19
  20. MotoTex

    MotoTex Miles of Smiles

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    Really enjoyed the detailed write-up!

    The idea of a 950 in a Hare Scramble is intriguing. It has been fun surprising folks with just what I can get away with when riding with them on their 250's and 400's.

    It's always more fun than riding with most of the GS/Strom crowd :D but not as many opportunities to take a break as I'm seldom waiting as long for the smaller bikes to slinky up.

    For now I tend to carry everything in the tank bag and top box for daily riding. I have strapped some MSR bags to the crash bars for week-long road trips, mostly to clear waterproof space in the Caribou top and side boxes for clothes and things that wouldn't fare well in a torrential downpour.
    #20