When your skills fade what?

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by hapbob, Mar 21, 2014.

  1. scfrank

    scfrank Old farts riding club.

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    I tried the car thing. Had a Z3. Nice car. I appreciated it when it was cold and wet, but its not a substitute for riding. Im 67 and just bought a 2011 GS. Yes, the size shows in the slow stuff. Just stick to the street. I can see how smaller is good though.
    #81
  2. scootrboi

    scootrboi Long timer

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    In Scooterland, 250cc is called the sweet spot, where you get outstanding fuel efficiency and good performance. To a reasonable degree.
    #82
  3. hapbob

    hapbob Been here awhile

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    All I'm saying this thing is fun to ride and very comfortable. Has the harley sound and feel. I have 250 scooter but when I want to put some miles on a trip this trike is very cool. Much lighter steering than I thought. I took it on my normal roads and I know I can do the corners faster than on my Road King I just sold. I know you say I'll never ride a trike. I probably said that in past now my life is older and I'm riding a trike. Just sayin this is more fun than you would think .
    [​IMG]
    #83
  4. scootrboi

    scootrboi Long timer

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    It is a handsome machine and I hope you have a lot of good times on it.
    #84
  5. hapbob

    hapbob Been here awhile

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    Thanks
    This machine is comfortable and fun to drive in different and same way as bike.
    Try one if your thinking
    Harley's can be test drove.
    Hap
    #85
  6. basketcase

    basketcase lifelong reject fixer

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    Thanks for sharing the story. That is a superb looking Miata. :thumb

    Thinking back on it, I was initially drawn to the Z3's because of my past BMW motorcycling experience. We are comfortable with the Z3 but truth told, we could have been or could become equally as comfortable with a Miata or any one of the several other choices.

    hapbob, a trike may not be my personal style but don't hear me putting off on the riders who like them. If it works for you, just enjoy it!

    And it looks like the snow has thawed. Personally, I'm so glad spring is here and the riding season has reopened that I could SHOUT! :clap
    #86
  7. ggoytia

    ggoytia Mobile Fatso

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    WOW................ I want :eek1
    #87
  8. 2tallnwide

    2tallnwide Long timer

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    Bought my wife a '72 Fiat 124 Spider Sport when she had to give up riding her motorcycle. She absolutely loves it, and doesn't miss riding her bike at all.

    [​IMG]

    I finally broke down and got a Geezer Glide for us to ride 2up. Kinda liking the slower pace, ABS, cruise, and even the stereo. :D

    [​IMG]

    Another plus is no longer having to worry about getting a wheelie ticket in Florida...:lol3
    #88
  9. TRZ Charlie

    TRZ Charlie That's MR. Asshole

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    I just finished reading this thread and its insight is overwhelming. I will be 65 this year, I started riding a home built minibike when I was 14 years old. I then worked for the local motorcycle shop and purchased a Bultaco Ace 100. I haven't stopped since. In fact I just purchased a Husqvarna TR650 (my 29th bike) and just finished farkling it.

    Truth is I can still ride single track with with confidence but I enjoy it a lot less than I did even two years ago. For me, it is a "been there, done that" and bought the Tee Shirt kinda thing. That said, I bought the TR it to keep me off single track. I purchased a bike that is too heavy intentionally. My biggest worry is that I will try to emulate my younger days (because to a degree I still can) and get hurt badly enough to end my riding altogether. This almost happened last year with a get off and a testicular dislocation (yes, I relocated my nuts & I don't recommend it). While this injury didn't cause me to quit riding it did stop me from riding for four months and it sure as hell made re-evaluate how I ride, where I ride, what I ride and what I can do to mitigate further damage to my body and not add permanence to the tenor sound I had in my voice for weeks after my last crash.

    I don't want to stop riding. I lift weights daily, I walk about 5 miles a week. My intent to ride as long as I can. Do I find it harder now? Yes, of course especially given that I have severe arthritis in my hands. But you know what, I am just gonna keep on, keeping on. Like others in this thread I have purchased a Burgman 650 and love it for local commuting and for those cold days when weather protection is a convenience. It is a great errand bike and very comfortable for an old body that jumped out of too many "perfectly good aircraft".

    Riding is part of me, it defines who I am, it makes me happy and keeps me relatively sane. If I get to the point where my balance is failing I will buy a Ural. But until then, I ride.
    #89
  10. YetiHunter

    YetiHunter 2 Wheels & Flyrod

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    I really enjoyed reading this thread.

    I bought my first full sized road bike the day I turned 16 and I just celebrated my 58th birthday. Yeah, it's a little tougher to throw a leg over the saddle now, but I'm hoping I have a decade or two left to ride.

    Would I go to a trike if I felt unsafe on 2 wheels?
    Yup, and I'd be happy doing it.

    I think the important thing is to keep on the road as long as you feel comfortable. 2 wheels, 3 or a rag top....whatever it takes. I figure I'll give it up one day, but not until I absolutely have to.

    For all of us in the third or fourth quarter.....keep riding whatever you can, for as long as you can.

    Hapbob...that is a cool looking machine, enjoy the hell out of it!
    #90
  11. Kawasakirob

    Kawasakirob Feelin Good

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    When my skills fade, I will buy a harley:freaky:lol3
    #91
  12. DougFromKentucky

    DougFromKentucky Just a good 'ole boy

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    At 62 (almost 63) I have developed a multitude of medical problems. I was in perfect health at 49 but at 50 I had the first of four heart attacks. The heart surgeon that did my quadruple bypass (age 51 for me) told me that my problem was that I had tiny arteries, a genetic problem. That year (post surgery) I also came down with diabetes and Rheumatoid Arthritis. All of this has made a huge impact on my life as prior to this I had been in perfect health and had lived a very active lifestyle. No more repelling, running, long distance hiking at my doctor's insistence. I did continue riding motorcycles (all of my doctors hate it). Recently I found that I was having difficulties mounting and dismounting my Wee-Strom. I lowered it and marched on. The final stroke for the Wee was I started having pain pulling the clutch. A lot of pain. Okay, time for a regroup. I finally accepted that I need to sell my Wee-Strom and put an ad here in the Market yesterday (a sad day for me). I bought a Suzuki Burgman 650 last spring and my hand pain went away after an offer of a joint fusion from a hand specialized Ortho doc which I passed on. Yes, the Burgman is still a heavy bike (a little over 600 pounds with fluids) but the weight is low so the perceived weight is lower. I can handle this bikes weight although I am now seeing that I am not as strong as I was even 3 years ago. When I get to the point to where I am going to have trouble holding this bike up, I will either trike it or go to a smaller, lighter scooter. I fully intend to ride as long as I can.
    #92
  13. Pantah

    Pantah PJ Fan from Boston

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    I am 65. I still ride dual sports on double track. I can manage sand and rock gardens. When I can't handle a simple dirt road I'll just drive something fun with four wheels. I wouldn't be caught dead on a trike.
    #93
  14. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away

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    Being a long-time rider who is a bit older than you, I should perhaps understand why folks enjoy riding trikes, but I don't. If you are, for what ever reason (e.g., old age, aches, etc.) not going to lean, why not not lean with the option of having comfort when you want it? You can get all the wind in your face and not lean with a small sports car. The small sports car could quite possibly cost less, handle much better and get better mileage than the trike if you're a smart buyer. Going ATGATT isn't an issue (unless you like having to dress up), you can stay warm in cold weather, keep cool in excessive heat and cover up and stay comfy in the rain. Perhaps someone could explain the attraction of trikes to me. The only reason I can come up with is that it lets folks ride with or relate to other bikers/riders without seeming like a dork in a cage (i.e., it's more of an image than ride thing).
    #94
  15. MeinMotorrad

    MeinMotorrad Long timer

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    Those Gilera Fuoco 500s have always appealed to me - they lean. Those can am things - no way.

    [​IMG]
    Not my picture.
    #95
  16. pixguy

    pixguy Adventurer

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    I'm 76 years old (just) and I ride a Honda ST1300. It's a big bike, for sure, and heavy but I've lowered the bike to make it easier to handle; I can get both feet down at a stop and that's important for me. It's also well farkled with handlebar risers, radio, cruise control, etc.. Touring, 300 mile days are my limit. After that, I'm tired and then I make mistakes. In town, I don't ride during heavy traffic peaks and I avoid riding at night. I stay within speed limits and, if I'm riding with a group (always small), I ride my own ride. If they have to wait for me, so be it and they always do. I won't even consider having a beer while I'm on a ride and I won't ride with people who do.

    Some have commented here that dropping a bike was the big turning point in making the decision to stop riding. I've dropped the bike several times, only once since I lowered it, though. If you go on the ST forum, you'll find it's a common occurence and age has nothing to do with it.

    I work out at a fitness center 3 times a week and concentrate on back and leg strength excercises. I keep my weight down. Obviously, mental fitness is important, too, so I do a lot of reading, no chore because I always have, and I play games like chess or anything that makes the brain cells work.

    I'd like to take more riding classes to help the skill levels, but they are hard to find. There is an MSF class supposedly for experienced riders but I found it to be simply a repeat of the basic class at slightly higher speeds. I found a local course taught by a moto police trainer and was a civilian version of a police training course. I found the guy to be an opinionated back end of a horse who thought ABS brakes were dangerous and no one over 65 years of age should be riding. So much for that.
    #96
  17. Mobiker

    Mobiker Long timer

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    Yes!
    As one of the Harley riders said as they were lifting the BMW which had mischeviously pinned me to a gas pump in the Yukon, "Anybody who rides much and says they never dropped a bike in a parking lot is lying."
    :D
    #97
  18. zerohype

    zerohype Long timer

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    Just saw and rode in one of these in Maryville, TN at the Dragon Pitt Inn & BBQ. Very fun and the sound coming from the S&S (I believe) motor? :nod
    #98
  19. DougFromKentucky

    DougFromKentucky Just a good 'ole boy

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    I usually save my drops for when there are witnesses, such as the time I dropped my bike at the top of the Dragon in the parking lot with about 300 people watching. Had people who helped me lift the bike, tell me that they all had assumed that it would be them who dropped their bikes in that lot. It is paved now (was gravel back then).
    #99
  20. pjm204

    pjm204 Long timer

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    I've already owned a ural and I guess I'm not sure how a trike or sidecar helps when your skills fade? From my experience it took just as much concentration on the Ural as it does on a 2 wheeler. The only reason I can see getting a trike is if you're not physically capable of putting your legs down at stops.

    What am I missing? And having two wheels in the back seems like a poor idea?