Where do you invest your time?

Discussion in 'Old's Cool' started by Jproaster, Jan 5, 2018.

  1. Jproaster

    Jproaster I work too much

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    Just happened upon a short article on Motorcycle Classics website about the R80ST.
    The r80 looks good modified as a lightweight and light duty scrambler; maybe a future project prospect? I'm a noob looking to get a good start working on bikes.

    After reading the short article, I realized that with all the potential data mines (and time wasting data black holes) it might be wise to ask how others learn, get inspired, find stuff, etc.

    So, if you care to share, how/where do you invest your time in regard to working on older motos? Online, mags, meets, etc.

    Thanks.
    John
    #1
  2. Mista Vern

    Mista Vern Knows all - tells some.

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    Hanging around with like-minded people keeps the creative juices flowing plus one learns a lot. Sometimes one learns how to NOT do things, and that is very valuable in of itself. I hope that is what you were going for in your query.
    #2
  3. bk brkr baker

    bk brkr baker Long timer

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    [​IMG]

    This is based on a R-80 GS , if you copy this , you'll be a hero.
    #3
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  4. danedg

    danedg Horizontally Opposed

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    As a "johnny come lately", my best investments have been acquiring the knowledge and skills necessary to maintain and ride the bikes that appeal to me. Beyond the ROI, is the satisfaction of appreciating the bikes as mechanical wonders, worthy of attention.
    #4
  5. David4

    David4 Been here awhile

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    Good question!
    As an investment of capitol it is a poor one, most people do not want a vintage motorcycle. Exceptions occur of course, IMHO enjoying the work is the best reason to own and ride older bikes.
    Are you a tinkerer? One needs to be.

    Been through it...

    FB9AC6C1-51A1-4FBD-BAC9-512BE6D10379.jpeg

    Locate the group of local enthusiasts in your area who rode brand X (your new bike) back in the day and never left. You’ll meet some great people and they’ll have the experience, knowledge, parts books, workshop manuals and tools etc.
    Fall in, be a friend, time well spent.
    #5
  6. Caesars_ghost

    Caesars_ghost Vertical twin

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    Pretty sure most people just buy what they like, with a healthy dose of randomness thrown in, because you never know what's going to show up on Craigslist or when a friend of a friend is going to decide to sell something, and word gets 'round to you.

    I'm sure there are guys who have dedicated their lives to becoming the foremost expert on R80s, and have built a dozen of them. There are other guys who eat, sleep, and breathe Norton Commando, or Meriden Triumph twins, or Enfield singles, or Kawasaki two stroke triples, Honda SOHC 4s, Ducati twins, etc. Whether it's because they had one when they were new or happened to run into one later as a classic, I suspect the stories are all as individual as the bikes.

    What matters is what you personally like, and what you like to spend your time doing. (Riding? Wrenching? Going to rallies? Modifying/customizing?) Do you like two strokes? Four strokes? Italian? German? Most people have preferences, rational only to them, if even that.
    #6
  7. Jproaster

    Jproaster I work too much

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    Oh man! Do I want to be a hero!
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  8. Jproaster

    Jproaster I work too much

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    Beautiful. And they're just sitting there anxiously waiting for you to come home!
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  9. Voltaire

    Voltaire Titanium and Ceramic Hipster

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    As an owners of a Commando, Ducati Darmah, Guzzi Lemans and some BMW's I'd say the R80ST is a good choice.
    Easiest one to work on, good all rounder, nice to ride either on sealed or gravel roads, two up or solo.
    Lots of upgrades/information available and spares are only a week away via Motobins.
    Only downside is you might find it undergeared for motorway use.
    I find the metric bikes easiest to work on as grew up on metrics.
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  10. Jproaster

    Jproaster I work too much

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    Variety...spice of life is a good thing. And I really hope to happily discover a niche, lucky find and general stuff too.
    My query is just- how do you spend time "doing your thing?" Reading online, the mags, time with folks, etc. What's profitable (not monetarily).

    John
    #10
  11. Caesars_ghost

    Caesars_ghost Vertical twin

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    Oh ok, your post came across to me aa a bit vague and it kind of seemed like an existential question about whether it was better to build an R80 scrambler, or focus on something else. Forgive me for misinterpreting.

    Personally I kill downtime at work by browsing the forum, ride and work on my bikes when I have the time, (neither of which are too old but both of which are fairly old school and one or the other is always needing something) and don't do much more than that in terms of "the scene" because family and other life stuff mean my time and resources for what is really a hobby (obsession?) is limited.

    RealClassic.co.uk is another site/magazine which has a lot of good articles about different old bikes.
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  12. Jproaster

    Jproaster I work too much

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    Dang. Rereading my original point, I see your point about vague. I should do better.

    Thank you for sharing too.
    John
    #12
  13. Jproaster

    Jproaster I work too much

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    Spot on. Thanks.
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  14. olegbabich

    olegbabich Been here awhile

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    Do not be afraid to make mistakes. There will be some.

    I learn from mistakes. There will also be the drive of shame, when I make a mistake that is too complicated and only a pro can fix what I fucked up.

    Good luck.
    #14
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  15. KingFishman

    KingFishman Flatland wanderer

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    Online research seems to return more useful info for me especially bike specific forums. Of course you will have to do a lot of history searches, but that always uncovers other useful tips that you didn't know about.

    King
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  16. bodine003

    bodine003 Been here awhile

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    Many options, here is one. Leeds Alabama. just east of B-ham. www.barbermusem.org The Barber Motorsports Park a huge 3 day vintage event in Oct. plus a museum that is probably the best in the world. Best 3hr ride south you will ever take. Lots of good all-round info here. & also www.britbike.com & www.triplesonline.com
    #16
  17. GBen

    GBen Been here awhile

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    The best use of time spent on motorcycles is that spent riding them. Get a bike you are interested in and just ride it to get groceries or visit your parents etc. Spend no more time than is necessary on modifications and maintenance to keep it reliable and practical for the road. Go with one motorcycle at a time. This way will save you money and time for things that matter. Go walk on the beach or hang out with your parents before they kick the bucket.
    #17