Where the f*ck is the bike?

Discussion in 'Face Plant' started by joefromsf, Mar 3, 2013.

  1. 805gregg

    805gregg Long timer

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    I'm glad you are ok Joe, thank god for good gear, wow you always want a picture of your crash scene, but that was spectatular, so are you still going to DV? and isn't that DR something, a crash like that and still going, Suzuki should use that in their sales video
    #61
  2. TrophyHunter

    TrophyHunter Long timer

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    I think all the descriptors have been used, but egads comes to mind.

    Your experience has cemented the fact I want my SPOT on my person...not the bike. I don't know where yours was, but if it was on the bike, it may have been even longer before the button got pushed.

    I ride enough around drop offs that this sent chills up the spine. SPOT going on body...ASAP.

    So glad you're able and willing to share the crash. Just incredible stuff.
    #62
  3. Lutz

    Lutz Killer Rabbit

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    Close enough, though!

    I'd think after your incident, even a stay at the Ritz wouldn't need further justification.
    #63
  4. joefromsf

    joefromsf Dark Happens

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    SPOT has been on my body since day one for the reason you mention. I used to carry it in my jacket waist pocket, but since I had just added the tracking option I needed a location with better view of the sky. Luckily my hydration pack has a small pocket at the very top that has worked perfectly. :thumb
    #64
  5. jbcaddy

    jbcaddy Long timer

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    there are really no words that cover that quick ride down. :huh If it had not been you that started this thread, I'd have expected much worse when you fell over sideways after sitting up. I was amazed that you got up and made it up the slope to the road. Heal well :clapand quickly
    #65
  6. sandsman

    sandsman I ride more than some and less than others.

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    Wow is the only word to come to my mind. So I take it that you are still on the road right now. That this just happened within the last couple of days. Well if you are able to continue on this ride, you must know that you have an angel that is right there with you. Watching the video, I knew you had to have some major injuries, yet basically you were just bunged up a bit. Well safe traveling for the rest of your ride.
    #66
  7. lmychajluk

    lmychajluk Long timer

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    Did it? The pics on p.3 were dated 9/12?
    #67
  8. ER70S-2

    ER70S-2 Long timer

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    :nod

    I always send my Sister an OK on the SPOT, just to let her know I'm rollin'. The map pocket in the tankbag was convenient for that, especially since the buttons are 'soft' and I like to watch to make sure the OK is being sent. I'm going to try it on the front of my coat where I can see it and push buttons. Hopefully the signal will be able to get past me. :wink:

    I'm makin' adjustments. :nod
    #68
  9. joefromsf

    joefromsf Dark Happens

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    If you've ever had badly bruised ribs (or worse) you can probably relate to what I went through. Afraid to cough, sneeze, laugh or even take a deep breath because of the pain. Basically, anything involving your core abdominal muscles also hurts. I'm a side sleeper, but couldn't sleep on either side. But I was willing to act like I might still continue the ride, so our task the next day was to retrieve my bike and luggage and evaluate its roadworthy-ness. And I had to get a follow-up x-ray late that afternoon.

    We checked out of the motel, but left Darrell's luggage in their storage room. If we needed to stay in Price another night we'd find a cheaper motel. BTW, since the crash was my screw-up, I was covering all motel and food costs for our stay in Price, as our preferred accommodation was a flat spot on the ground.

    I got to ride as a passenger on Darrell's DR650. Like me, he had removed his passenger pegs so it was a pretty uncomfortable ride. When we got to the sheriff department office in Castle Dale, the parking lot was empty, and I feared our trip was for naught, as it was September 3, the Labor Day Holiday. :eek1 But the door was open and there was a phone to pick up. Somebody answered, I explained why we were there and he came out and led us to the storage garage. He opened the bay door and the bike fired right up. We moved it outside along with my luggage and we gave the bike a thorough examination and fixed things as best we could.

    We spent 3 hours working on the bike and we lucked out as it was on the shady side of the building.

    [​IMG]

    Off the top of my head, here is what we worked on.

    • Straightened bent front fender stabilizer as best we could.
    • Adjusted rox risers, handlebars, handguards and handlebar controls.
    • Adjusted bent turn signal brackets
    • Adjusted bent luggage racks
    • Had to remove the headlight bracket and straighten it out.
    • Checked lights, headlight and one turnsignal were out. Replacements sourced from autoparts store.
    • Straightened bent rear brake pedal.
    • Discovered one of the rear subframe cross brackets was busted. Stabilized with hose clamps from autoparts store.
    There were some things we couldn't fix there but they weren't showstoppers.

    • License plate light was broken
    • Gas tank mounting bolts were slightly bent.
    Normally I do all my own work, but we needed to be expedient, so splitting the work made sense. Except where an extra set of hands was needed, we worked on different parts of the bike, and I had absolute trust in whatever work Darrell performed.

    Oh, and another minor miracle. I was able to resurrect my GPS. :clap It wasn't pretty and it wouldn't be waterproof but it worked.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    #69
  10. cme4lyt

    cme4lyt Been here awhile

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    Joe,

    Great to hear that you are OK. That was quite a scare and you came thru' it pretty well.

    Riding with friends is a must for me. I very seldom, if ever, ride solo because of incidents like yours. You just never know when lighting is gonna strike....

    Look forward to seeing you at Mendo 3. I'm sure you'll have some great camp-fire tales for us all !

    Take Care....Jonathan
    #70
  11. sandsman

    sandsman I ride more than some and less than others.

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    I see the dates now......:norton
    #71
  12. ER70S-2

    ER70S-2 Long timer

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    I love my 276C, the grand daddy of the 478. I'm not sure what I'm going to use when it dies. :2cry
    #72
  13. Cabrito

    Cabrito Terminal Lurker

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    Man-O-Man....

    Glad you were okay. That video is insane...
    #73
  14. Chris618

    Chris618 Been here awhile

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    Wow! Glad to hear you made it through that horrible accident.
    #74
  15. sparklr

    sparklr Adventurer

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    While I understand the logic behind your comment I don't necessarily agree with your perception of the event. If you would review the video again and consider the time interval that elapsed, between loss of control and the plunge there wasn't much time for a decision to be made that would have resulted in a more positive outcome. The brain has to make an appropriate response before the muscles carry forth the action. In this case perhaps the saving grace may have been the inability to slow down, which may have resulted in a different outcome altogether. Fate RULES once in a while.

    Covering the brake and clutch is great in theory, again not likely to have altered the outcome. I think this notion is more relevant for the street and track. Some of us like myself who have small hands find this almost impossible, not that we are white-knuckling but more comfort and security related. Couple that with a heavy and laden steed it becomes evermore increasingly difficult, especially on challenging terrain.

    My response was meant to be informative not argumentative. I would hazard a guess that many of us here don't or can't continue the brake and clutch cover method for any lenght of time. This is more of a SHIT HAPPENS moment and there is something here for everyone to learn. Thus I wait for the OP's version of events.
    #75
  16. joefromsf

    joefromsf Dark Happens

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    We remount all my luggage and we're set to head off back to Price.

    [​IMG]

    Hard to believe this was about 28 hours after my accident, and I would then be riding my bike at 60 mph for 30 miles on UT-10. I had no problem riding, but getting on and off the bike was painful.

    Back to the hospital for another chest x-ray and a consult with the doc. X-ray showed no change. Not getting worse was actually pretty good news. The doc did not have a strong enough opinion to try to dissuade me from continuing our ride but told me to quickly seek medical care if I had any trouble breathing. We also talked about my medication. I could take the prescription drug for sleeping but not during the day as it would make me drowsy. He advised that I could take 800 mg doses of ibuprofin a couple of times a day.

    Great. We took off to get Darrell's luggage and checked into the cheaper motel.

    The next day we'll be back on the TAT. :freaky or should it be :eek1.
    #76
  17. Rob.G

    Rob.G Mostly Harmless

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    Wow, Joe! Quite the little adventure!!! I'm very glad you chose to share this with everybody. It's a great learning experience, it helps reassure (me at least) that SPOT is still worth the money (I've had one since they came out), and it's a huge testament to the durability and simplicity of the mighty DR650!!!! I thought for sure your forks were bent. Then I thought for sure your bars were bent. And turns out none of that was the case. I think all your soft luggage helped save the bike. If it had been MY DR650 going off that cliff, it would have been much worse with my hard (plastic) luggage. At the very least I would have had to hunt everything down and buy duffels to carry stuff. Maybe I'll be rethinking that for such trips. :)

    And to think... the weekend that was happening, I was camping by myself up near Mount St. Helens.

    Rob
    #77
  18. crofrog

    crofrog Long timer

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    It was 3.4 seconds from when the big sounded liked it started lugging. It was 1.7 seconds from when the bike slid sideways to going off the cliff. Either is well inside the reaction time.

    It didn't look like he was in a good position to attack the terrain he was faced with both from a control input and riding style standpoint. So the terrain bit back. He very well could have just been relaxing and not expecting any problems when something unexpected occurred and the bike slide out sideways, but no action was ever taken to correct the slide.

    Throttle stayed constant, brakes never came on and he never counter steered.

    Had he been covering the clutch when the wheel started to spin up he could have cut the power and the bike likely wouldn't have oversteered nearly as much, same for covering the rear brake, and he wasn't travelling that fast so he likely would have been able to stop before going off the cliff if he had the brakes covered.


    It's way way way more needed off-road than the track. On the track you know exactly where you're going to have to brake every single lap. Off-road is constantly reacting to what's happening and you need to be able to instantly manipulate and overlap all 6 controls (body position, handle bar input, front brake, rear brake, clutch and gear change). The faster or more intense the riding the more important it is to cover the main controls (front brake and clutch).

    I'd hazard to guess you speak for a very small part of the ADV rider community that rides off-road. Every or damn close to every serious off-roader and racer covers the controls at all times. When riding fast off-road you are required to make hundreds of control inputs a minute to stay ahead of the terrain.

    With the exception of some of the MXers because once again they know when the brakes need to come on.

    If you can't cover your levers you need to adjust them.


    My intention wasn't to be harsh to the original poster, although it will probably seem that way. Shit happens to everyone and we all get caught out.
    #78
  19. TinkerinWstuff

    TinkerinWstuff Take it apart

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    thank you very much for sharing your story.
    #79
  20. Thumper Dan

    Thumper Dan Been here awhile

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    How did the Wolfman Luggage hold up?? I have some myself and curious to see how much of a bashing around they can take??

    Glad you're ok :freaky
    #80