Which one? BMW F800ST/F800R or Triumph Street Triple R

Discussion in 'Road Warriors' started by basstodave, Apr 10, 2012.

  1. basstodave

    basstodave Been here awhile

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    I am listening. I test road the f800r today. I think I have started a thread about two bikes I though represented some sort of standard for spirited street riding and that they would be versatile, too. I have found them both to be too sporty for me. Too tight a cockpit. A little too firm a ride. I am learning.
    I am out of ideas. But. Maybe the 800st is the right compromise. I have to live with the plastic but is the riding crouch a little more relaxed or identical to the 800r. A little more space between seat and peg or pegs a little more forward? It could be also that I am wearing Motoport stretch kevlar jeans and they have a lot of armor. Ankle to hip. And perhaps there are parts available to lower the peg a bit.
    #41
  2. ADVBMR

    ADVBMR Polygamotorcyclist

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    Yes, there are parts to lower the pegs and others to alter the ride somewhat; risers, for example. But gear? Get yourself comfortable in your gear first, then try the bike. If your gear doesn't feel right in the living room, don't try it on the bike.
    #42
  3. basstodave

    basstodave Been here awhile

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    My Motoport gear is well broken in and it is simply the best for me.
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  4. Cos

    Cos Re-Greekified

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    Meh...tank shmank...i'm plenty happy on the street with my 955 Daytona locomotive. :lol3

    For the OP...you thought the F800R was too sporty?
    #44
  5. Mike in Oregon

    Mike in Oregon Been here awhile

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    I'll chime in here: Had a BMW 2007 f800s. I have a 34 " inseam and the seat to pegs was too tight to be comfy for me. I added a peg-lowering kit from some Suburban Machinery, or some such. That helped, but I never got on with the bike. Sound is important to me and I thought that parallel twin sounded awful--purely subjective of course. I also had an '07 Speed Triple (not STREET) and sounded terrific to my ears and was just plain fun.

    If you want FUN, lousy to non-existent passenger comfort, sweet sound strap a bag over the passenger seat and-- go street triple. If you want a very competent commuter, good gas mileage, abs, heated grips and if you are ok with the soundtrack, the f800st is great.

    They are all great bikes. Depends on what you want.

    How about a Versys for more comfy/less tight quarters or used KTM 950 or 990 SM?

    Edit--sorry posted without reading all the posts--No Street Trip after a test ride.
    Frankly the twin in your Wee is an awesome engine--how about a lightly used SV650? BMW G650gs? Lightly used Honda 919 (find a low mileage '07 and ride the crap out of it??)
    #45
  6. Tripped1

    Tripped1 Likely Lost.

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    I have Daytona internals!:deal

    I'm trying to find time to put GSXR forks on it, because it was cheaper to get the forks for a 2003 GSXR wholesale than it was to get the tools and parts to rebuild the stockers after 115,000 miles lol.
    #46
  7. basstodave

    basstodave Been here awhile

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    For the OP...you thought the F800R was too sporty?[/QUOTE]

    Just the seat to peg height. I am 5'6" but I have a 31" inseam. Too much bend in the knee. Between my age and a point I made earlier about the somewhat bulkiness of Motoport pants the height and angle combined to make it uncomfortable for me. That is what I meant by too sporty. Seating position.

    I don't care much what a bike sounds like. It could be silent AFAIC. I'm wearing ear plugs and a full face helmet.
    Oh, I did like the clean air of the f800r. No half assed fairing in front.
    I test road the f800r and the 650gs. The 650 was, no surprise, like a lighter version of the Wee. It was fun but the price tag was a riot.
    I liked the f800r. But on Tucson streets it would beat me up after a bit. I fully appreciated how plush the Wee is after my test ride. I also had to admit what a boat it is.
    #47
  8. Grainbelt

    Grainbelt marginal adventurer Super Moderator

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    I'm increasingly convinced that (like me) you're at a point where quality suspension starts trumping everything. The under-ten-grand category is sort of a wasteland when it comes to forks and shocks.

    You might consider budgeting two grand over whatever you buy and get some seriously upgraded forks and shock, and pay somebody who knows their shit to set it up for you.
    #48
  9. Garp

    Garp Long timer

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    Based on the fact that everything seems to be too hard and too sporty, I'm thinking he needs a barcalounger, not quality suspension. That said it needs to be a nimble, rugged, sporty, fun but not too boat like Barcalounger with a nice cushy ride.

    How about a Honda NT700V. Honda's website says it is "nimble" "fun" and "potent", of course in large parts of the world it is referred to as the "dullville"but I think it may be just right for you:D
    #49
  10. Grainbelt

    Grainbelt marginal adventurer Super Moderator

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    My understanding - and as an owner of budgety middleweights, I'm no expert - is that quality cartridge forks and rear shocks can be set with different rates for high- and low-speed compression damping, such that when the spring rates and static sag are correct, harsh sharp-edged bumps are absorbed but brake dive and wallowing are mostly eliminated. The brief rides I've had on better equipped bikes seem to bear this out.

    :dunno
    #50
  11. Garp

    Garp Long timer

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    You may well be right, but my experience has been that whatever faults the stock suspension on my bikes had, they weren't a $2000 problem.
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  12. Grainbelt

    Grainbelt marginal adventurer Super Moderator

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    With my FZ6 you have to pretty much throw away the stock stuff and fit previous-year R6 forks, and an aftermarket rear shock. It might not be $2k, but I bet if you paid someone to install and set it up it would get close.
    #52
  13. JeffPM

    JeffPM Been here awhile

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    A couple of suggestions for the OP, you might want to have a look at a Yamaha FZ8 or an SV 650 or a new '12 WeeStrom. Another possibility is to throw some money at your present Wee. Upgrade the suspension, mods to drop some weight and a pipe or something to improve the power a little.

    Good luck with your search!
    #53
  14. basstodave

    basstodave Been here awhile

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    Thanks.

    I have upgraded the front fork spring. I also upgraded the front brakes from a two pot sliding caliper to a GSXR 4 pot caliper. The brake conversion initially went well but recently I'm not so sure. I began my search to find a bike around $10k with quality suspension and brakes out of the box. Turn the laugh track on.

    Anyone have a nice 2007 SV1000 with converta-bars or an LSL handlebar kit?
    #54
  15. LoriKTM

    LoriKTM Wrecking Ball

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    Since you're already looking at older model bikes, consider the Buell Ulysses. Nice upright riding position, fully adjustable suspension front and rear, and very good brakes. You should be able to easily find a decent low mileage Uly for $6-8K. We have an '09, and it has 14,000 miles on it with no issues. Most of the mileage put on by my 6' 3" husband, but I've been riding it a lot lately and find it comfortable to ride at 5' 3" (if a bit of a reach at stops). The pillion accommodations are also very comfy.

    You may also want to give the Tiger800 (roadie) a test ride. Should be a bit less sporty than the Street Triple, but it does not have the fully adjustable suspension.
    #55
  16. basstodave

    basstodave Been here awhile

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    Why does the cheaper ST3r have better brakes and suspension than the Tiger 800? I don't think the Tiger owners are complaining about the brakes and suspension but on paper they are spec'd lower?? The Tiger would replace my Wee but not what I need or want. I want a 17" front wheel next bike.
    #56
  17. Cos

    Cos Re-Greekified

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    Ulysses

    Previous Gen Multistrada, especially the 1100
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  18. Garp

    Garp Long timer

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    Because they are designed for completely different audiences. People who buy bikes that are known for their handling are sometimes willing to pay the extra for higher spec components and factories like Ducati and Triumph give people the choice. When Triumph sees a market for a Tiger with high spec Ohlins suspension, they may make one as an option, but for now they have to be price competitive with BMW so you get a lower spec.
    #58
  19. cug

    cug --

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    I think you didn't answer the real question: what makes the Tiger so much more expensive than the Street Triple R and still have less quality suspension and brake components?
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  20. Garp

    Garp Long timer

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    Different markets have different sensitivity to price. Why does a bleeding edge BMW S1000RR cost less than an R1200GS? Because if BMW wants to compete in the sport bike market they have to be price competitive. If people are willing to pay more and get less, you can't blame the manufacturers for taking their money.
    #60