Why are all the new ADV bikes so complicated? Does everyone really want ABS, etc...?

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by wavygravy87, Jun 25, 2014.

  1. wavygravy87

    wavygravy87 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2009
    Oddometer:
    176
    Location:
    Abalabama
    Alright so I want a new bike. I ride a DR650 and love it to pieces, but I want something better suited to grinding slab all day, but still able to do a little forest service road riding. My problem is, I don't want a bike with ABS, traction control, immobilizer systems, and could even live without EFI.

    What did you expect from a guy on a DR right? :lol3

    After talking to a lot of my riding buddies, none of them are really interested in bikes with all those options either. Are we just weird? Or does everybody really want all these options? I had my heart set on a Super Tenere, and could score a decent deal on a new one, but the traction control and ABS, and the brake force management stuff seems a little ridiculous to me. The service manual for a Tenere is far and beyond the thickest one out of all the new Yamaha bikes. And this is the bike to ride the world on? :huh

    I considered a Tiger 800, but the smart key immobilizer "chip in the key" stuff sounds like a good way to be stranded with a perfect running bike. And turning the ABS off is a pain in the ass. I've heard of more than a couple instances of immobilizer problems...

    Am I the only one that wants just a plain ole multi cylindered ADV tourer type bike without all the electronic nanny systems?
    #1
  2. Happy Snapper

    Happy Snapper GOMOB.

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2009
    Oddometer:
    2,201
    Location:
    Brisbane, almost heaven!
    Had my Super Tenere out in the Australian bush last Saturday. Ended up on a muddy black soil road with a muddy creek crossing. Coming up out of the crossing it was the traction control that got me to the top.

    Twice the back wheel slipped to one side (would have had me on the deck) as it lost traction and twice the traction control "grabbed" it and I continued on.

    Would not have made it out without it.

    And the ABS has saved my bum lots of times... on the road and in the bush.

    I was like you when i bought the S10.. now i wouldn't have a bike without electronic rider aids.
    #2
  3. NesquikNinja

    NesquikNinja Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2012
    Oddometer:
    347
    Location:
    East Missouri
    Get a scrambler!!!
    #3
  4. wavygravy87

    wavygravy87 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2009
    Oddometer:
    176
    Location:
    Abalabama
    DONT tempt me....

    I've threatened to do it more than once! :lol3

    I got to ride one the other day actually, and I really liked it. Maybe one with a windshield would be the ticket? :ear
    #4
  5. scrameville06

    scrameville06 Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2014
    Oddometer:
    79
    Location:
    Colorado
    Bonneville or scrambler cant go wrong.
    #5
  6. inglysh

    inglysh Completely Custom

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2010
    Oddometer:
    169
    Location:
    Oshkosh, Wi
    Second this. first day on the s10, too hot going into a corner on a busy street and the abs saved my ass.

    traveling on atv trail a guy in front of me stalled. following too close going uphill, was able to climb out of a rut and get around him w/o falling over. without the traction aid I am certain that I would have tumbled, possibly falling backward.

    extremely happy with it thus far. eats up tarmac with ease. I am a way better rider on this bike than I was on my last.

    only complaints thus far is the abrupt (to me) throttle response and the sharp headlight cutoff when cornering. hoping to cure the throttle with an ecu reflash... eventually. tried piaa 530 drivers to improve the illumination. not impressed.

    she's also a pig in sand. atleast at my hands.

    bike is a delight 2up, fyi.

    Sent from my SCH-I545 using Tapatalk
    #6
  7. KMC1

    KMC1 There is no spoon.

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2008
    Oddometer:
    2,568
    Location:
    Greater SLC
    Hell no! You're not the only one!
    I'm scared to death of either the Immobilizer going dead or losing / wearing out my key in the middle of fricking nowhere!
    I don't care too much about ABS as long as it can be turned off, and traction control etc. but why do they have to weigh 650lbs and have the threat of an unfixable electrical problem???
    #7
  8. wavygravy87

    wavygravy87 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2009
    Oddometer:
    176
    Location:
    Abalabama
    I can't deny the fact that ABS and traction control are handy and do perform as they are intended (most of the time anyway). But it's just not something I want on a bike to travel to whoknowswhere on.

    It would be awesome if you had the option of buying a bike with all the options, or without. But I can see why it's easier for the manufacturer or dealer to have just one version in each model, though.
    #8
  9. wavygravy87

    wavygravy87 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2009
    Oddometer:
    176
    Location:
    Abalabama
    Alright, so I'm not alone! Great news. :freaky
    #9
  10. MotorCade

    MotorCade Rugby whore

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2010
    Oddometer:
    457
    I recently traded in my Guzzi V7 for a tiger 800XC for the do-it-all nature of the thing. I frigging love this bike. And I'm a luddite, too. I still have one of my Ducati Elefants for completely raw big-bike fun, but technology has definitely marched onward. And parts are getting harder to find for the simple (old) bikes.

    Having the new bike makes living with it daily (and I am on it EVERY day) a lot easier. Easy starts, easy maintenance, strong brakes, great handling, and enough power to embarrass older sport bikes at a stoplight. And it's delivered smoothly. Rides two-up well. I'm sure a lot of the new breed of bike is similar in these traits.

    My Elefant is like a Jeep CJ, and the Tiger is like a Jeep Rubicon. It's more capable, and it's less raw. Both have their place. It's easy to carry spares for EFI bikes, for what it's worth, if you're REALLY doing the around the world stuff. If you're not leaving a civilized country, just going camping, you'll probably find parts availability to be great on the new bikes.

    Cheers
    #10
  11. danketchpel

    danketchpel Long timer

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2010
    Oddometer:
    2,655
    Location:
    Camarillo, CA
    I rather agree. I wish you could buy a bike more based on options. They could sell a base model and enable the extra features as you paid more. It could be dealer enabled/downloaded as it's all primarily software. Ya, there's a couple sensors etc but nothing that wouldn't take a dealer less than an hour to install if designed right. I understand electronic suspension would be different so that's a major step up.

    But quite honestly I'd rather spend the extra $1.5-2k on hard parts or luggage. I rode for decades without all that stuff just fine and don't need it. I like EFI with direct cable control and electronic ignition but that's about all I want.
    #11
  12. plodalong

    plodalong Now if we just.....

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2007
    Oddometer:
    658
    Location:
    griffith NSW
    Like others said, If you want a basic all roads bike the Bonneville/Scambler will cope. Wouldn't try to get too serious in the dirt though.
    #12
  13. Tarka

    Tarka Doesn't wave back.

    Joined:
    May 10, 2007
    Oddometer:
    2,089
    Location:
    Across the pond.
    I don't agree that traction control got anyone out of any ditch or up any slope.

    Nor do I agree that ABS got anyone around any corner,etc.

    All that these things do is over ride poor throttle control or the effects of panic braking.

    So yes..in a twisted,female logic kind of way,they sort of did achieve the things the people say....but they didn't give the tyres any extra grip off road and they didn't add or improve anything in corners.

    All these gadgets do is over-ride or compensate for heavy handedness or bad technique.
    Ultimately they'll lead to total dumbing down of rider ability and remove awareness of the consequences of not doing things more appropriately or more correctly.
    #13
  14. R0CKETMAN

    R0CKETMAN Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2010
    Oddometer:
    36
    Location:
    NGAMTNS
    ABS is your friend on the road and in no way "dumbs down" your riding ability as was earlier suggested. On wet pavement it's a real bonus. The ability to turn it off when off road would be nice.

    Traction control is something I could do without on a "do all" bike, but it sure is nice on the pavement when the unexpected occurs.
    #14
  15. Pecha72

    Pecha72 Long timer

    Joined:
    May 5, 2008
    Oddometer:
    4,495
    Location:
    Helsinki, Finland
    I've got FI, ABS & immobilizer, no TC (not needed on a DL650 either) and I'm perfectly happy with them. The bike could go round the planet any day, problem is me, no time to do trips nowadays...


    (and by far the loudest opposition against such systems almost always comes from riders with very little to no personal experience of them. No offence, and just my 0.02 - and I agree they DO make bikes more complicated, but the only way to avoid that these days is to keep your old bike.)
    #15
  16. RonKZ650

    RonKZ650 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2009
    Oddometer:
    273
    Location:
    Lakewood, CO
    I've got a Super Tenere and been riding 44yrs. My first motorcycle with ABS and traction control. If I had my way, I wouldn't have either. Much better off doing my own braking and throttle control. I've got 15,000 miles on it.
    #16
  17. argentcorvid

    argentcorvid Some Guy

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2010
    Oddometer:
    511
    Location:
    Marshmellow-town, Iowa
    Not everyone's a pro.

    #17
  18. cls

    cls Long timer

    Joined:
    May 7, 2009
    Oddometer:
    1,424
    Location:
    N GA
    No, you're not the only one. I don't need all the extra weight, expense, or potential reliability issues. Give me light, strong, simple, comfortable, and reliable. KLR doesn't have enough room for 2 good sized adults, so it'll probably be a well modded DL650/Wee; an older model and inexpensive, so I don't have to worry about it off-road.
    #18
  19. wavygravy87

    wavygravy87 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2009
    Oddometer:
    176
    Location:
    Abalabama
    But no one will ever be able to become a pro if their bike does all the learning for them..
    #19
  20. DRZBRI

    DRZBRI Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2013
    Oddometer:
    97
    Location:
    Granbury, TX

    Well put.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    #20