Why do we do it?? torture? Personal satisfaction? What?

Discussion in 'Old's Cool' started by lrutt, Mar 20, 2013.

  1. nachtflug

    nachtflug infidel

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    always like the 360's. I started riding in 1971 with a 100 cc Kawasaki. my older cousin got us into riding and he had a new DT1. didn't see a RT1 in person until 1972 but when I did it was like seeing the holy grail. the 72's were the solid paint schemes with no stripe. my second bike ever was a 72 CT2 and then moved up to a leftover 72 DT2MX in 73. I was pretty well armed for 15.

    the 1972 DT2MX and RT2MX's are 2 of the sweetest looking bikes ever, particularly the RT2MX with the black stripe. Gorgeous bike in my book.
    #21
  2. vtwin

    vtwin Air cooled runnin' mon

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    I can't match the talent of a lot of the folks here on Advrider, but I'm working on a pretty rusty Stinger. Unfortuately, I cannot do the chrome or paint work, so I won't be able claim any credit for that. We'll see how it turns out.:D
    #22
  3. Grinnin

    Grinnin Forever N00b

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    Maine
    Why do we do it?

    To learn? Learning something new causes our brains to release dopamine and feel good. Just learning.

    To know? When something isn't right while I'm riding, I have a pretty good idea about the workings and pieces involved. Just that knowledge is as good as having a manual with me.

    For practice? Having had all my engines open means I know the ins and outs of opening them the next time. The unknown can be daunting while the known is comforting. (But the unknown can also beckon us to learn.)

    For sanity? It may be Spring in Maine, but the forests are still white and the roads are piled with salt. I've been out, but not these past 2 weeks. Meanwhile I have these pistons to re-ring.

    My projects are more modest -- turning rolling non-runners into travelers. I've never started with a box of rusty parts.
    #23
  4. lrutt

    lrutt SILENCE.....i kill you

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    Agreed. Having a bunch of old bikes in a sig line usually tells me that person has a brain in their head and some skills. I catch a lot of shit for my sig line on here. Many think I'm just bragging or whatever but that is not the case. Likely most of the people that comment do not understand what it takes to bring that old iron back to life. And oddly enough, I enjoy tinkering with them as much as riding.

    I like this part of Advrider better than all the rest, at least we are all like minded in here.
    #24
  5. blaine.hale

    blaine.hale Long timer

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    That's definitely a nice one but it's also an example of "let's throw money at the wall and see if it sticks."

    I'm more impressed by the vast majority of not-so-wealthy talent on this forum that manages to build equally as beautiful bikes on little to no budget.
    #25
  6. nachtflug

    nachtflug infidel

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    I disagree. Given the condition of the H2 you weren't going to resurrect it the way he did without throwing a lot of money at it there is just no way around it. If you want to do a one off custom of something you can get by on the cheap that H2 is Pebble Beach quality and credit is due and deserved particularly in light of the condition it was in.
    #26
  7. vtwin

    vtwin Air cooled runnin' mon

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    +1, factor in the purchase price (op made money off the restorer), shipping cost (it went to the UK) add that in that most of us would not have had to put in. I used to be into British cars, I've seen the brits take a rusty hulk and turn it into a really nice vehicle. Next time your at a newstand, check out Practical Classics. We in the states are spoiled by the way we can pretty much dump vehicles when they get a little rusty or break down.
    #27
  8. vtwin

    vtwin Air cooled runnin' mon

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    #28
  9. Iron_HawK

    Iron_HawK Farkle Enthusiast

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    Great thread here! The original post is well written and inspirational in itself. I'm 22 years old and I might have a different reason I do it... Granted I don't have the funding to spend on what I wish I could do, I like the mind set of the restoration. It's a different way of thinking. It's a form of expressing myself through the mechanics of a machine. It's a form if art. I wish I had more time and money to focus on the building and restoring of bikes and trucks. For people like us this is what we love and breathe. I wish there were more people that would focus on rebuilding instead of buying the newest and "greatest". I'm sort of jealous by the older generations where they grew up with these 60s 70s and 80s bikes. I guess what I'm trying to say is that it's a gearhead mind set and that's what keeps us going.
    #29
  10. nsu max

    nsu max Been here awhile

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    I just finshed (sort of) rebuilding my '76 Guzzi Convert for the second time in 7 years. I really enjoyed it.........I think.:lol3:lol3:lol3:lol3:lol3:lol3:lol3
    #30
  11. Cat Daddy

    Cat Daddy Cob Artist

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    I doubt Natchflug was talking about my junk when he mentioned the 175 Yamaha. But, even so, I did one and it makes no sense to anyone but me.

    [​IMG]

    Why did I do it ? Because a motorcycle is a living creature to me. They have soul. They talk in a voice only a few lucky ones can hear. Restoring these old bikes is akin to setting on the porch in rocking chairs listening to an old man tell me stories. Respect. Take you hat off when he's talking. Listen to every word he says. You'll learn more about the world and yourself than you can imagine if you'd just shut up long enough to take it all in.
    #31
  12. duck

    duck Banned

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    I view it as an obsessive compulsive disorder. I've brought a good number of K bikes back from the dead. The best part is taking them out for the first ride.

    My biggest project was my K75. I started with a bare motor and assembled it out of parts from lord knows how many other years and models of K bikes. It is truly a Frankenbrick. When people ask me what year it is I reply: "About twelve." :D

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    #32
  13. Badjuju

    Badjuju Biker Billy

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    I can identify with all these quotes, and have done many of these projects--both motorcycle and automotive--down thru the years. What disturbs me is the realization that for most of my life, I guess I have had the sickness that makes me want to save poor, broken things just to see if they can be made whole again.....which now that I think about it, may be how I've chosen most of the women in my life down thru the years...Yikes! Man, I need to go see my shrink with THIS NEW REVELATION!!!
    #33
  14. sjc56

    sjc56 Long timer

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    I have brought home, rusted bikes, crashed bikes, burned up bikes, I look at a pile of s*** and see a jewel and I always say this is my last no more but then another finds its way to my garage. I figure I saved a bike ( mostly Guzzi's) from the scrap heap and passed it on to a happy new owner.
    #34
  15. dzu

    dzu Outstanding

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    Very Nice Work Love the throw backs...to know where your going have to know where you came from.
    #35