Why is Transalp that famous? Need help choosing a bike!

Discussion in 'Land of the Rising Sun: ADV Bikes from Japan' started by Skyy223, Aug 23, 2017.

  1. paquo

    paquo Been here awhile

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    Congrats, ta was my first bike as well, i still have it cuz it's a keeper.
    #61
  2. Skyy223

    Skyy223 New on the Road

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    How the heck can I put the cable from the navigation system on the battery? :D
    I have so much to learn :loco
    #62
  3. neppi

    neppi Adventurer

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    You can draw a pair of leads straight from the battery (don't forget the fuse) and put a weather-proof ziggy lighter / USB socket somewhere next to the meters. Or find an "after ignition" fuse in the fuse box and take it from there.

    Go to transalp.org and use the 'search' thingie. You'll find heaps of sleepless nights... err... I mean info there.

    You'll find also the Haynes manuals there. Some made 'sticky', but I've also posted a link to this one (Hungarian?) guy who has it all in PDF on her site.

    Just take time to read as much as possible about what other peeps have done, ride and camp as much as possible and then after a while you'll know what's needed and what not. You can spend bazzillion €s on making it "better", where people have gone RTW on stock bikes. And stock Transalp is a good bike!
    #63
  4. Skyy223

    Skyy223 New on the Road

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    That would be the first question... how do I fuse it? Please take in account that I never worked on a mechanical or electronical device before. Im a 100% beginner :p

    I'm actually already proud of myself that I managed to bring the Cow onto the mainstand for the very first time just now :D
    #64
  5. neppi

    neppi Adventurer

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    There's always YouTube!!! Ü

    If you wire it straight from the battery, put an inline fuse at the battery end of the positive lead. You can get them anywhere. Kaufland's, Obi's, or even Esso's car isle, not to mention the part shops!

    If you want to do it the hard way, there's actually an empty slot in the original fuse box. You'll need to wire it and then fuse it in there. Looks stock.

    Google is your friend. And YouTube. And these forums.

    A free tip. Now that you are neck deep in the swamp anyway and you need some more tools, just don't buy cheap! I know you said earlier that all the money is gone now, but especially when you're poor, don't buy cheap tools! Good tools make half of the job, bad tools make you go crazy.
    #65
  6. Noprogram

    Noprogram High Plains Drifter

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    Good advice from Neppi. Probably the easiest is a 12V 'cigarette lighter' socket that is handlebar mounted (vs panel mounted) that you can wire directly onto the battery with a fuse on the positive lead. You can buy these on Ebay or buy a system with a swappable plug attachments off companies like Givi. Try to buy a good one at least. You'll want a version that's around 130cm, has ring terminals, fuse and a protective cap. The cigarette lighter socket version (vs USB) has the advantage in that you can plug different attachments into it like a dual USB plug with different amp outputs or your GPS 12V vehicle power lead. The disadvantage with this type of system (wired directly to the battery) is that if you leave the GPS on the bike and powered up it could drain the battery (you can always bump start, but it's a pain of course).

    The alternative is wiring directly into your ignition circuit so the power turns off when you turn the ignition off. This is preferable but trickier. I'm not saying you couldn't do it, but from your description it might be best to wait until you're a bit more confident in your skills and knowledge before you chop into the wiring loom on your schöne kuh?! -It's always good practice in general to avoid the risk of compromising the system integrity of any electro-mechcanical system unless you know what you're doing and there's a good reason to i.e. it's broken or soon will be. Or just be like the rest of us; you really have to learn the hard way!

    You'll need to run the wires along the frame under the tank and to the battery compartment so you'll need to loosen the fairing and lift/prop the tank up. The wires should be in a place where nothing can rub on them. They should be secured along the frame so they won't come loose and in such a way that the wires aren't abraded by the zip ties or bands (Honda zip ties). -Use electrical tape to locally wrap the wires and then use a wide zip tie to distribute the load. The objective is prevent any short circuits or power drains occurring in the future. If there's any problem you can always disconnect the ring terminals at the battery.

    Like most things it's all about planning and preparation: watch videos, search the forums, read the manual, get good tools, take your time and use a methodical approach. There's a good tool thread in 'Equipment'. -Make a list and get yourself one or two quality tools or a piece of equipment every payday or month etc. Helps keep you motivated about working if you have a goal. Good luck!
    #66
  7. Noprogram

    Noprogram High Plains Drifter

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    Got some more photos of the Milka Kuh?
    #67
  8. neppi

    neppi Adventurer

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    How's it going? Did you burn down the bike rewiring it or are you just having too good time riding it and so you've forgotten us all?
    #68
    Noprogram and Paletes3 like this.
  9. Skyy223

    Skyy223 New on the Road

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    I'm sorry I haven't been on this side of the Internet for a while :p

    Good news: I learned alot about the electronics while fusing my navigation system and during Trouble shooting a Problem I had.
    Bad News: I found out the hard way :p My Battery drained completely empty after about 2 weeks. I never left the Navigation on. After get rid of the (already installed) alarm system, the USB plug and the navigation system cable the battery drained empty again after ~150km.

    After some measuring with a multimeter and some trouble shooting my suspect was the regulator thing right next to the battery because I've found out that the voltage on the battery is not increasing while going up to 5000rpm.
    So I charged the battery a third time and drove the Transalp to the seller (warranty)...today he called me that the regulator indeed is broken (unknown if it JUST broke (maybe beacuse of my cables?!) or was broke already when they sold the bike). Need a few more days since they have to order a new one. Hopefully next week I can ride again. And then I indeed will post some more pictures (I want to get back into photography with my old and dusty Pentax K-50)! :)

    So yeah, it sucks when the bike is ill but I learned ALOT because of it.
    #69
  10. Noprogram

    Noprogram High Plains Drifter

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    We were wondering where you got to. Well, the good thing is that you didn't burn the Transalp down...yet! :D

    Yes, you'll have plenty of 'learning opportunities' no doubt, but that's what it's all about. You'll get to know your bike with every lesson and become more confident in your abilities as you solve each problem. Skills that will come in handy for your RTW or wherever. Better than just wondering what part of a 'black box' has failed and calling in a dealer.

    I'm not sure exactly what the Transalp Regulator/Rectifier setup is like per se but they can be problematic on the XRV750, so I imagine that it's likely to be a similar issue of undersized connectors from the stator causing a voltage overload (it could possibly be compounded by additional load...Neppi?). -Check that the stator output connector contacts (has three yellow wires running to it) are clean and the plastic isn't burned, which indicates high resistance/current has overheated it . The reg/rect is also prone to premature failure from heat and vibration so could have just failed on it's own. The best solution is to replace it with a Mosfet reg/rect that's hardwired to the stator output wires. -It's not hard to do. Let them replace this one and then order in the correct Mosfet for your bike so at least you have a spare ready.
    #70
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  11. 2old2Bbold

    2old2Bbold was 2bold2getold

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    Congrats on the TA. You're gonna love it. With your experience with small bikes, you won't have any problems. Man, what I wouldn't give to be 26yo, living in Europe with a new (to me) Transalp. Might want to pick up a few spares (CDI's, tubes, tire tools, etc.) before getting too far from home.
    #71
  12. Skyy223

    Skyy223 New on the Road

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    I can pick it up today, but they only put in another used regulator xD
    If this one breaks again I will probably get a MOSfet one, I've heard they are way better? Is that true?
    And where could you relocate the regulator? Is under the seat an option? From the dirt and dust down there I would say there is no airflow at all :D
    #72
  13. Noprogram

    Noprogram High Plains Drifter

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    Yes the Mosfet is a lot better at keeping a stable voltage. I wouldn't bother relocating the regulator from its current position as it would require changing the wire length and it should work ok in the current position. -There might be a cooling problem in Spain but a German Autumn shouldn't be a problem : )

    While you have the covers off it will be worth checking the air filter is clean and seated correctly. Learn how to check your oil level as well....warmed up bike, upright on a level surface. Correct chain tension also.

    A dash mounted volt indicator will come in handy for telling you if you have a voltage under or overcharging situation and hence whether your reg/rect is failing i.e. your battery is about to go flat or your electrical system is about to catch fire :D It will give you enough warning to get somewhere before your reg/rect completely fails. I'd order a Mosfet regardless, as it's worthwhile upgrade that'll give you peace of mind. I got an indicator off this guy and saved me a couple of times....

    http://jhau.maliwi.de/mot/voltmeter.html
    #73
  14. Skyy223

    Skyy223 New on the Road

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  15. Noprogram

    Noprogram High Plains Drifter

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    Yes, that could work....
    #75