Why you should NOT buy a Ural motorcycle

Discussion in 'Hacks' started by bokad, May 28, 2012.

  1. BWeber

    BWeber Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2014
    Oddometer:
    406
    Location:
    Kansas City
    I understand the point of small children and helmets. I've done the same things in my sidecar. My point was the state chose to go after the driver against the wishes of the parents.
    I doubt anything will happen unless there is an accident. If there is an accident it would be a fair probability you will spend a few months as a guest of the state. Not to mention the spin the local news may put on it.
    Just be careful.


    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G900A using Tapatalk
  2. slogo3

    slogo3 Adventurer

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2015
    Oddometer:
    14
    Location:
    NW arkansas
    Today my wife and I went to a Ural dealer and had a demo ride in a gear up model. Itwas difficult to turn at slow speeds. I don't know if this is normal or if the steering damper can be adjusted to lessen the steering effort. The bike wanted to drift to the right. This was at a speed over 30 mph and it didn't seem to make any difference if I was in the right or left lane on a city street. I was in the left lane while passing a parked pickup.

    Can someone tell me if these things are normal in a Ural? Appreciate any and all help and advice. If we end up buying one , my wife says it will be burgundy and have a windshield.

    Thanks
    SLOGO3
  3. TurTal

    TurTal Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2015
    Oddometer:
    351
    The rig will naturally want to follow the irregularities of the road...you're keeping it straight with constant minute corrections

    Feels odd at first but you'll have adapted to it by the end of the day


    If its set up correctly it should go down a FLAT road straight

    Throttling on and off causes the rig to move right or left....that's normal and can be used to your advantage

    If the tub brake is biting sooner than the rear brake...that will cause the rig to go right....not normal and should be corrected immediately

    Alignment
    Tire pressure and tire condition
    Loose bolts
    Loose bearings
    Damper settings
    Improper setup at Dealer
    Passenger Windshield

    All play a part in how the rig...brakes...turns...and handles


    Don't let it bother ya....it can all be sorted out


    Go easy and take your time...go slow into and out of turns...especially right handers

    Practice pinching the tank for upper body stability

    Practice body position

    Practice panic stops






    Here's a little TurTal tip....If its set up correctly its better to let the rig do what it wants

    Do not fight the machine or try to wrestle it around....you're just gonna get tired and frustrated

    Keep a light grip and move with the machine....feel what it wants to do and flow with it

    After a bit it will become second nature....and you'll become one with the wiggly beast





    Cheers!



    .
    tuffgong, sloMark and triumphsidehack like this.
  4. gsjo

    gsjo Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2007
    Oddometer:
    289
    Location:
    Silver City NM
    The Yellow Book ----A must read
    "Driving A Sidecar OUTFIT"..
    Sidecars are different..
    But Fun
    triumphsidehack likes this.
  5. Bobmws

    Bobmws Curmudgeon At Large

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2005
    Oddometer:
    2,547
    Location:
    Same trailer, different park, FL
    More operating info here.
    brstar likes this.
  6. eastbloc

    eastbloc comprador bourgeois

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2003
    Oddometer:
    1,423
    Location:
    Brooklyn
    My first Ural was a solo, which is weird in itself. But the first sidecar rig I had ever ridden was a '96 Tourist I picked up in 2000 from a nearby "dealer" for just $3k. The 30 mile ride home I alternately cursed and prayed to get home -- and I'm an atheist :lol: I thought I had made a huge mistake. Would I even make it home?

    Fast forward 17 years, several Urals and one BMW-Ural outfit later. Sidecars feel as familiar to me as my own physiognomy, and certainly as familiar as any two-wheeler. Yes, it's peculiar, it won't feel right at first, but like scotch or any other acquired flavor if you persist you will get used to it and love it. The physics of the chair and the steering effort and all that other stuff are just your mind trying to apply what it knows about two-wheeled cycles to the hardships of operating a sidecar rig.

    Those hardships carry rewards. Once you internalize it, it will feel like second nature and you might even (as I do) feel more comfortable on three wheels than you do on two.

    If you have doubts (and honestly, unless you're a complete nutter, you should) find a starter rig. Maybe not a Ural, there's lots of stuff on the Hacks forum here in the thread from Craigslist and eBay and other stuff. Lots and lots of awesome rigs there. Don't cost much (much less than they cost to build) and you can entertain the heck out of yourself.

    Give one a try. If you find yourself liking it, but wishing it a) had reverse b) had 2WD or c) was more temperamental and needing of care from time to time, buy a fucking Ural and join the party.
    tuffgong, mtrdrms, TurTal and 5 others like this.
  7. 9990

    9990 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2012
    Oddometer:
    143
    Location:
    Behind a desk, itching to ride
    Exactly.

    I'm finding it more fun to crackle & pop our way down to the Post Office at 25 mph on the Ural than to explore the outer (lower?) limits of lean angle clearance (and my courage) on the Street Triple at semi-ridiculous speeds. The Street Triple RS is a fantastic motorcycle, but it doesn't really start to come alive til about 70 mph and above. Not that it can't be ridden slowly, it can, but that's not the fun zone of that bike. Whereas the Ural is an adventure at any speed, and perfectly satisfying at 25 or 30 mph.

    The Street Triple is like drinking expresso - all the time. The Ural is like... going for a walk in flip-flops or sandals on the beach - a bit more work, and slower, but you enjoy the scenery and experience more. Ok, that's mixed set of metaphors, but best I can come up with at the moment.
    mixxedupmedia, TurTal, jabreu and 3 others like this.
  8. 9990

    9990 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2012
    Oddometer:
    143
    Location:
    Behind a desk, itching to ride
    SLOGO3,

    You've already got 4 good answers above, just wanted to add my 2 cents.

    If it helps, think of the sidecar as a big weight attached to the side of the bike. When you accelerate, the weight wants to lag behind, and the bike will feel like it is pulling to the right. When you brake, the bike will slow down while the sidecar will want to continue at the same speed, making the bike feel like it is pulling to the left.

    The sidecar brake minimizes the second effect a bit (by braking the sidecar at almost the same rate) so it's mostly the first effect you feel - especially weird if you've never felt it before. I'm still getting used to it, but loving it.

    Also, just wanted to second the advice to let the rig move around as it needs to, don't fight it or wrestle it, let it move underneath you a bit as you guide it while keeping control.
  9. bross

    bross Where we riding to?

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2005
    Oddometer:
    5,697
    Location:
    Osoyoos, BC
    And just remember that once you fly the chair, you're back to riding a motorcycle! :D

    The dogs don't even stand up for balance anymore, just lean a bit and take it all in stride.

    Not me, just found on the web...

    [​IMG]
  10. Bar None

    Bar None Old School Dude

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2007
    Oddometer:
    9,297
    Location:
    WNC SWFL
    SLOGO3,
    Above replies pretty much right on the mark.
    Maybe the best thing to do is buy a used late model Ural (my recommendation is a 2014 or newer) or a completed non Ural rig. Get whatever at a reasonable price so that if a sidecar is not your cup of tea you can get out without a big loss of money. Be sure and give your hack experience a reasonable amount of time to allow you to adapt to the bike. Or and make sure the hack is set up properly, maybe one of the veterans on here can help you.
    eastbloc and TurTal like this.
  11. bruceco

    bruceco Adventurer

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2015
    Oddometer:
    89
    Location:
    woodstock ontario canada
    These guys with experience are right on the money.It definitely takes time. I put my velorex /klr combo together with help from this forum.
    I was all excited first time out and almost f------ing killed myself in the process. Slow and steady I got used to it and how the rig behaves differently than a bike without a sidecar. Steer,Steer,Steer.It is hard after almost 50 years of solo adapting and leaving those leaning habits behind when you ride it but it will come. Having a ball now but still ride my other bikes too. I do notice I slow down with the rig and enjoy the ride more than on my other bikes.I took out a 2012 ural at a rally last year and really enjoyed it. Never got any highway time on it though. Nice of the person to let me try it out.The klr was the easy and cheap way to see if I would like it. I already had the klr .Listen to these experienced riders and just go and get it.
  12. Bar None

    Bar None Old School Dude

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2007
    Oddometer:
    9,297
    Location:
    WNC SWFL
    ^^^^^^
    "I do notice I slow down with the rig and enjoy the ride more than on my other bikes."
    Me too.
  13. trumpet

    trumpet Group W Bench

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2008
    Oddometer:
    2,401
    Location:
    Connecticut
    Unlike being on the bike, speed limits for curves with the sidecar aren't suggestions. :hide
  14. BWeber

    BWeber Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2014
    Oddometer:
    406
    Location:
    Kansas City
    If you over cook a corner there are not many options with a sidecar.
    The decreasing radius curve can be a religious experience........

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G900A using Tapatalk
    9990 and NxtGoRnd like this.
  15. High Octane

    High Octane Long timer

    Joined:
    May 31, 2013
    Oddometer:
    1,225
    Location:
    South Dakota
    Depends on what you drive I think. I don't consider myself a very good sidecar driver but I can quite easily add 20-25 mph to the posted curve speed when I ride my Kwack and 10-20 with my Zook. With my old spongy JDRocker rig I never got confidence to challenge the posted speed.
    FR700 likes this.
  16. cycleman2

    cycleman2 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2010
    Oddometer:
    865
    Location:
    Alberta, Canada
    Very true.
  17. Sidecarjohn

    Sidecarjohn SidecarJohn

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2008
    Oddometer:
    835
    Location:
    Yorkshire, England
    This thread has changed relative to how it began. It's a pity that useful information has consequently been "lost" because the original title has seriously past its sell by date.
    Time to close, admin ?
  18. Tarka

    Tarka Strangely strange. Oddly normal.

    Joined:
    May 10, 2007
    Oddometer:
    2,351
    Location:
    Across the pond.
    Headmaster has reappeared with his got to be different font style after a long absence.
    Doesn't like how a thread that's not relevent to his own machine has changed.
    Wants it closed and asks as if only he and the moderator are on the same level.
    Ho hum.
    tuffgong, retroone, Bar None and 2 others like this.
  19. Sidecarjohn

    Sidecarjohn SidecarJohn

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2008
    Oddometer:
    835
    Location:
    Yorkshire, England
    Predictable response from the class jester. Hum ho.
    Surely, the thread has changed from the ups and downs once displayed.
    The observation remains, some good stuff from contributors has been sadly lost in a thread (see title) that has likely run its course.
    As for "reappearing", and "relevant to his own machine", maybe just a tad arrogant ?
  20. Bar None

    Bar None Old School Dude

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2007
    Oddometer:
    9,297
    Location:
    WNC SWFL
    Sidecarjohn,
    Just don't read any thread that you don't like.
    tuffgong, DaFoole, SkagitStan and 2 others like this.