Wi-fi signal all over the house, how hard can it be..??

Discussion in 'Shiny Things' started by Ricardo Kuhn, Sep 13, 2017.

  1. Ricardo Kuhn

    Ricardo Kuhn a.k.a. Mr Rico Suave

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    My wife got a new house but the wireless Signal is horrible so she is thinking in one of those "multi room" systems..

    The question is what to get..??

    Three stories high made in the 20's with lap & plaster if that makes any difference..
    #1
  2. MN_Smurf

    MN_Smurf Capt_Confusion

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    What standard is her current system? If it's any less than 802.11ac, then try upgrading/adding a router to the system first. I was running off the stock wifi router in my phone company supplied modem, which gave a barely usable signal at the extremities of the house. I added an new router into the system and the wireless signal went to full bandwidth everywhere in my house. New routers can be gotten for $50-$60.
    #2
  3. ctfz1

    ctfz1 Long timer

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    There are signal extenders, though they may reduce "bandwidth?" Signal speed?
    There are also extenders that use house wiring to transfer signal. no idea how well they work.
    Top line business routers can be very good and very expensive.
    #3
  4. Ricardo Kuhn

    Ricardo Kuhn a.k.a. Mr Rico Suave

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    Sorry for the horrible picture, very shaky hands some times..
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    This work great for us at the old house in utah, but not now..
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    And we have a small ''repiter'' somewhere but is useless..
    #4
  5. MN_Smurf

    MN_Smurf Capt_Confusion

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    With that hardware, you should have plenty of signal going out. 802.11ac is the most current standard.
    #5
  6. eatpasta

    eatpasta Lawnmower Target

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    We have started using these quite a lot at work because they work just about as well as the Ruckus stuff that costs 10 times more.

    TP link AC1200

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    They do dual band 2.4 gHz and 5 gHz so you get better wall penetration with the 2.4 and more speed with the 5, where you can get it.

    I have one in my house as well as the wireless that runs from the router and it's a pretty huge blanket.

    Grab two of these and see if you can get one on each end of your house - that'll probably do the trick.

    If not, just return 'em. Hell they are only $60 apiece.... what there to lose
    #6
  7. 68deluxe

    68deluxe Long timer

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    Where do you have the base station? Do you have regular computers or Apple? Some computers may be able to act as repeaters to help with other devices (via bluetooth). Plaster and lath may be more restrictive to the signal than regular sheetrock.
    #7
  8. David_Moen

    David_Moen Long timer

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    There are some "Mesh" network products coming out for home use that give you a single SSID and the ability to roam from one access point to another seamlessly. The are a bit spendy, but the 2 I've installed for customers have worked very well.

    Asus Lyra

    https://www.asus.com/ca-en/Networki...DiWjGRKwcYwHWBy-cyP84XAtWWbeFHsMaAsEzEALw_wcB

    Uniquiti Amplifi

    https://www.amplifi.com/

    Ubiquiti has been in the commercial wireless networking space for ages, and their product works very, very well and is easy to set up. I think the US price for a kit is about $380.00 which I guess isn't bad. Up here in Canuckistan, it's about $600 which is a bit hard to swallow.
    #8
  9. shores

    shores ElBandido

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    Put that unit up high
    I do enterprise and large WiFi designs as well as evaluate a fuck ton of cpe (customer premise equipment for service providers ) such as that xfinity
    Ac is the new standard but 5ghz has poor penetration of building materials
    The new mesh are nice particularly if you get mu mimo with different radios so that one is used for backhaul to the main ap and rest are facing clients.

    You could also looking at ether net over powerline the latest g.hn works very well Instead of cat5/6 for internet and will have a WiFi ap at far end

    Best to put the main Router as high up as possible on top floor if possible
    If still poor then get a mesh ap or enet over power ap
    Using repeaters or simple extenders increase signal strength but cause a lot of interference and tie up airtime which actually reduces speeds for everyone

    WiFi is half duplex unless you have mu mimo everywhere
    The less dumb devices blasting interference the better
    #9
  10. Yossarian™

    Yossarian™ Deputy Cultural Attaché

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    Last year I spent $200 on a cable modem / router combo (Netgear C7000) and it punches signals throughout the house and yard.
    #10
  11. 12bridn

    12bridn I need throttle therapy

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    Are the xfinity router and the linksys both broadcasting wireless?
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  12. 12bridn

    12bridn I need throttle therapy

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    2.4ghz will have better range due to the lathe. 5ghz has a lot of bandwidth but penetration is not as good.

    Take some pics of your wifi settings (remove pws obviously) and lets take a look. Are you in a dense neighborhood?

    Do you have an android phone? A 99 cent app call Net Analyzer is a good tool to help diagnose wifi issues.
    #12
  13. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

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    We use "Home Plugs", goes in a wall outlet and you connect a spare ethernet cable to it - ours needed pairing, newer ones, maybe not - certainly more functionality, if not better performance. Anywhere else in the house, plug in the matching home plug. Internet in either wired ethernet or wireless flavours. With combined versions too.

    And "Through Plugs" which allow the socket still to be used as a socket by another appliance.
    Ones with USB sockets, to allow charging - maybe even data.

    Ours work seamlessly, despite being several years old now. New ones are cheaper.
    You can buy extras and extend further, should that be necessary

    UK wiring uses a ring main - most houses only have one. I have heard that the signal will go back to the panel/consumer unit and turn up on a different ring. No verifcation of that.
    Obviously ours would not work in the US as we have different plugs and sockets, but I have seen pictures of US ones - I presume they work as well.
    #13
  14. 12bridn

    12bridn I need throttle therapy

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    It does sometimes make sense to have the AP high to broadcast over top of furniture, aquariums and appliances that can block signal. In a 3 story home, it has to punch through all the materials to get to the ground floor, and half the broadcast area is lost to the empty space above your roof. For even coverage in your scenario, assuming the either box is omnidirectional, it should be centralized on the second floor.
    #14
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  15. 68deluxe

    68deluxe Long timer

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    Your neighbors probably appreciate it.
    #15
  16. Yossarian™

    Yossarian™ Deputy Cultural Attaché

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    I'm sure they would, if they could get past the security and the access restrictions.
    #16
  17. phillyrube

    phillyrube Long timer

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    Wife got a house? Where do YOU live?
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  18. 12bridn

    12bridn I need throttle therapy

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    Just saw the part about your repeater. Those often are placed in the wrong location, as folks want to place them in the area where signal is weak. In order for them to work, they need to have a good signal strength on the primary wifi and be within range of the area with a bad signal. Out of curiosity, what are you naming your SSIDs? Are they all different?

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    #18