Wind!!!! What to do?

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by vroom vroom, Oct 17, 2010.

  1. vroom vroom

    vroom vroom Forever Young!

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    I went for a ride in New Mexico yesterday in the early morning and was doing 75 MPH North on I 25 from ABQ to Santa Fe. I ride a F660 GS Dakar with a link that lowers the seat two inches. A half a dozen bikes passed me going 80 to 85 MPH. and they seemed to be stable.
    After going up a long, steep hill and starting the descent there was a slight left turn at which time I felt a wall of wind pushing me to the right. My bike began to drift and it felt like that wall of wind was not going to let me negotiate the left turn. My instinct had me drop my ass to the the left of the bike and ride it out. It was scary and I want to know what you guys do when wind like this plays a part?:huh
    Is this a common experience? Is there anything mechanically that may be wrong with my bike? I have the Weber racing suspension that is adjustable. I've never played with it but is there anything to do to make it safer to ride in wind?
    #1
  2. FirstPath

    FirstPath Long timer

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    Not a day ride report and should probably go to perfect line. In fact, search there as "Wind Riding" has been a previous topic.

    Good Luck,

    Scott in Shoreview
    '85 Voyager Hack
    '79 Suzuki GS550
    #2
  3. vroom vroom

    vroom vroom Forever Young!

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    Hi,
    Where does this post belong?:eek1
    I'm not sure what perfect line you are referring to.

    Yes, I did search wind, wind riding, pointers for riding in the wind etc. to no avail. Do you have anything else helpful to add or can you answer :ear my questions?
    #3
  4. GB

    GB . Administrator

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    Moved to the Riding forum.
    #4
  5. Lartech

    Lartech Been here awhile

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    Wind is just a part of our riding here in Wyoming. Gust definitely could catch you off guard. I stay loose in the shoulders and hand grip (kind of like a golf swing) that will keep the transfer of input into the bars when your upper boddy is getting blown around. Bend and drop your elbows so that your not stiff arming the bars. Shift in the saddle and give a lean into the direction of the wind.
    If I'm going into a corner, I'm dropping my speed and pushing the bars through the corner while leaning.
    #5
  6. Lartech

    Lartech Been here awhile

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    I don't try to keep up with other riders in the wind. The faster you go the more work it is to ride in those conditions.
    #6
  7. PT Rider

    PT Rider Been here awhile

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    Countersteer into the wind. If the wind is from the right, push on the right handlebar enough to keep a straight course.

    Stay loose in the saddle. Let the bike move around a reasonable amount under your stable upper body.

    Slow.
    #7
  8. DAKEZ

    DAKEZ Long timer

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    Stop fighting. Keep loose and have fun.

    I rode through Eastern Washington one time on my Dakar when it was so windy that for about an hour I was leaned into the wind so far I could touch the pavement with my finger tips.

    It was a bit tiring but I thought it was fun and a great experience.

    Ride Safe Ride Often.
    #8
  9. Roadrunner

    Roadrunner (Negativus Supersonicus)

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    Wind is common in NM too. I just ride it out on my little XT 250. I also lower my profile and speed a little since I have no fairing or windshield. :lol3

    You might also try highway 313 (the old Route 66) between Bernalillo and Albuquerque. Most motorcycles take that road for that 7 miles. The speed is about 50 - 55 MPH, the road parallels the railrunner, and the pastural lands there are beautiful. I like it a lot better than the construction through I-25.

    Slowing down and allowing more space between you and traffic is a really good idea when possible too, since wind sheers have been known to slam motorcycles, cars and 18-wheelers around without any warning on I-25. So even if you are staying in your lane well, other people may not.
    :ricky
    #9
  10. SCVGS

    SCVGS Adventurer

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    You need to relax and it will take more force on the bars to stay on course. Did you lower the front suspension as well as the rear??
    #10
  11. LuciferMutt

    LuciferMutt Rides slow bike slow

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    Wind? Welcome to riding in NM. Just wait until "spring" is here.
    #11
  12. blk-betty

    blk-betty bam-a-lam

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    What were those 1/2 dozen bikes that passed your going 80-85?

    I'm betting they were probably bigger and heavier bikes than your 660, makes a lot of difference in cross winds.
    #12
  13. tire joe

    tire joe Been here awhile

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    Shifting down a gear or two can make a difference, you are looking for the rpm of max torque .
    #13
  14. 243Win

    243Win Been here awhile

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    I got my butt handed to me in the wind down near Vegas last May on my poorly loaded DR650.

    Since then, I've improved my packing and that helps but is not your issue.

    I "tried" at the time to get down behind my windscreen and hide from the wind. This just made it all worse.

    Since then, I've gotten some more time in the wind and learned at least for my DR650, loaded for camping, to sit up, elbows up and stay loose -- helps immensely -- you could call it the dirt bike riding "attack position" from the waist up if that helps one to picture it.

    Good luck!
    #14
  15. FinlandThumper

    FinlandThumper Has Cake/Eats it Too Super Moderator

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    I ride a Dakar also and I know that these sudden gusts are problematic at times.

    In addition to the good advice above, try the "sail" method. On the windward side of the bike, turn your knee OUTWARD into the wind as far as is comfortable. This will create a counter-steering affect since it will want to pull the bike toward the wind. When a harder gust comes along, it automatically increases the counter-steering effect.

    It will really help the steering. I use it commonly on bridge crossings which tend to get a lot of wind.
    #15
  16. LuciferMutt

    LuciferMutt Rides slow bike slow

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    Yeah, sticking you knee into the wind really does it work. I find it uncomfortable so I only do it in places where I'm nervous that a sudden gust would push me into something very bad....over bridges, on very narrow lanes next with oncoming traffic present, next to walls, etc.
    #16
  17. Snowbird

    Snowbird Cereal Killer

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    Watch out on windy days when there is a cross wind and you come out of a protected area and suddenly get blown across the road or into the oncoming lane. It's easy to forget about a cross wind if you are protected from it for a while by terrain or trees.

    If cagers only knew how difficult riding is, perhaps they'd cut us some slack instead of terrorizing us. :rofl
    #17
  18. Uncle Pollo

    Uncle Pollo Long timer

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    Knee and elbow and butt if the wind is really strong.

    Or get an LT ...
    #18
  19. Phineas

    Phineas Joe Lunchbox

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    Thanks. I've got to try sticking my knee out into the wind. Most of the time I'm good weighting the pegs and keeping my hands loose on the bars. My quads are burning but my bike is stable. I think bike design more than weight affects performance in the wind. The little Seca II I used to have was great in the wind but the late nineties Triumph Sprints I ride kind of suck. It has to be really gusting before I even notice on my VFR.
    #19
  20. vroom vroom

    vroom vroom Forever Young!

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    Thanks for sharing your experience. It's good to hear your suggestions. Happy riding!!
    blessings to all of you:clap
    #20