Wiring Accessories in Stages - Best Way

Discussion in 'Crazy-Awesome almost Dakar racers (950/990cc)' started by tucsonron, Apr 11, 2006.

  1. tucsonron

    tucsonron Adventurer

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2006
    Oddometer:
    38
    Location:
    Tucson, AZ
    I am planning on wiring accessories but not all at the same time.
    -Two powerlet females-one in the glovebox and one somewhere on the side or on the fairing.
    -Wiring a GPS
    -Wiring Heated Grips
    This will be done in stages with one-two powerlets wired this week. What/How is the best way/order to wire all of these accessories?
    How should the switched/unswitched wires be used?
    #1
  2. ZenMoto

    ZenMoto Bikeslut

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2005
    Oddometer:
    685
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    Moorpark, CA.
    I currently have my GPS connected to the switched supply and have decided to move it over to the unswitched. I don't like that every time I stop for gas etc, the GPS switches to onboard battery power (if I even have batteries installed). If you plan on using your 950 off road, be sure to crimp & solder all your connectors. My heated grips went kaflooey on me this weekend while pounding on some local trails; I'm pretty sure one of my connections simply broke as I didn't solder everything when I installed them.

    I'll be going back in when I switch the GPS and correcting that oversight. :lol3

    Be carefull about how much you connect to a single lead. The supplied lines are rated at 10 amps, and you want to make sure you don't exceed that; the wiring uses a fine guage wire and will burn up if you overload one of the circuits. That said, I have no idea how much heated gear etc. actually draws (don't own any) but neither heated grips nor GPS should draw much current.

    Good luck.
    #2
  3. sailah

    sailah Lampin' it

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    Ron,

    My Garmin 176 is hardwired to the bike, power always on, works great if you turn the off the bike, doesn't reset.

    Handgrips are wired to a switched circuit.

    Aux lights are wired to the batt directly, (kinda) and switched via high beam. On/Off switch is located in glove box.

    I decided to wire all my acc to a powered tankbag which plugs into a SAE plug near the handlebars. SAE is also the plug for Battery Tender, 2 birds one stone. Wired with marine gauge 14 AWG, shrink wrapped.

    I have a 3 way cig plug in my tank bag that powers XM, charges cell phone, HAM radio, air compressor etc.

    AutoCom is wired to the tankbag.

    I don't have heated clothing, but I would mount a bulkhead fitting on my tankbag to plug gear into.

    I love everything plugged into the tank bag. One SAE plug, that's it. XM, BlackBerry, AutoCom, HAM radio all come with me when I get off the bike. GPS is the only thing that is mounted on the bike, but easily comes out of its touratech holder. I'd like to take credit for the amazing foresight, but basically it was WAAAY easier and loads cheaper.

    The cig plugs have been fine so far, I use bungee cord to hold the plugs in.

    I was convinced I needed a big-assed fuse block ie centech Blue seas, but after trying to find out how to make power cords with the correct voltage, amperage etc, my head started to hurt. Cords for all my acc I already own or are available from walmart for 10 bucks. Its not worth the time, maybe if you are an anal BMW rider:D

    The whole kit is slick as shit, comes off in 15 seconds, with all expensive toys in the tank bag safe and sound. Probably spent MAYBE $50 on the whole schebang. And that was using nice marine stuff.

    On the fence about soldering vs crimps. Somethings I do one way, others the other way. I have heard soldering joints are prone to snapping due to the stiffening efffect of the solder. I know its true on large battery cables for boats
    #3
  4. krusty

    krusty Banned

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2003
    Oddometer:
    589
    Wiring these items (handgrips and gps unit) on the KTM are so easy...
    Especially compared to my BMW. By removing the winshield/headlamp faceplate, you can access the wiring marked "acc 1" and "acc 2"
    acc 1 is always on and should already have the female connectors ready to hook up.

    acc 2 is on and off with the rest of the bikes electrical. (which ties in perfectly with the factory ktm heated handgrips)

    For my gps unit, I wanted to make sure the gps would switch off when the bike was turned off, so I tapped into acc 2 when I hooked up the gps power supply cables.

    I have never had an easier time working on a bike.
    (my bmw 1150gs was like performing lap band surgery on a cow).
    #4
  5. Bwana

    Bwana Me Bwana You Toto

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2005
    Oddometer:
    309
    Location:
    West Sacramento, CA
    Great advice here. I am also in the planning stages of wiring farkles to my 990. Following the recommendations here and other threads, I am going to wire my GPS to ACC1 (not switched) and my heated grips to ACC2 (switched).

    Now what is everyone's opinion on where to wire the KTM Aux lights since ACC1 and ACC2 will be used? Also, I want the lights to stay on all the time regardless of whether I have high or low beams on.

    Thanks.
    #5
  6. DakarNick

    DakarNick Swabee

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    Probably overcomplicated but I just thought of this as I was reading this. What about a contact switch to the sidestand, like the ignition uses. One could pull a heavy gauge wire directly from the battery to a accessory/fuse box without worrying about the factory fuses or wire gauge. The main supply wire could have that switch inline or via a relay to the fusebox.

    Sidestand down, power goes off. Up, on. Of course, you'd have to leave the stand down if you use the centerstand, to make sure it stays off.

    :ear
    #6
  7. jwalters

    jwalters Farkle Proliferator

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    Might want to double check Krusy's post. I think you have ACC1/2 backwards.

    #7
  8. Bwana

    Bwana Me Bwana You Toto

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    West Sacramento, CA
    Thanks. Made the edit.
    #8
  9. Louge

    Louge silence of the limbs

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    Nick, some related ideas to consider ...
    http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=127614
    #9
  10. sailah

    sailah Lampin' it

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    I have mine wired to a relay, and I think that's what you should do. You'll need to pull power from the solenoid, and a good ground on the frame. I put my relay on the alum frame tucked under the windscreen. Your power lead can come from any switched wire, like the ACC2 your heated grips are on(its just a trigger, so no real draw on ACC2). When the bike turns on, the lights come on.

    The relay is the only way you are going to get lights that come on automatically with the key.

    I would also put the switch somewhere where you can reach it if always on. My PIAA switch is in my glove box.

    The other nice thing about pullig power from the solenoid is that you can use it for other things like air compressor, wired tank bag, battery tender etc.
    #10
  11. Bwana

    Bwana Me Bwana You Toto

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    Oddometer:
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    Thanks sailah!

    Please excuse the dumb question but what is a solenoid? Also since I am attaching the grips to ACC2, how would I attach a power wire for the Aux lights to ACC2?
    #11
  12. petesonhisway

    petesonhisway Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2004
    Oddometer:
    383
    You may consider this overkill, but I thought I'd post it anyway (sorry the pic is so big).

    The unit fits comfortably under the dash and provides 3 fused outlets (but I doubled them up - 2 per fuse total 6 outlets) powered directly from the battery but activated by relay.

    Apparently there is a danger of frying your bike's electronics if you overload your accessory sockets. This method means your devices are powered directly from the battery through 30 amp wire (so nothing is going to melt under load), but the use of a relay connected to acc2 means the connection to the battery is only live when acc2 is live (when the ignition is turned on).

    It sounds complicated but really isn't - I am no electrician but was advised by electronics experts on OC that this is the recommended method, and am more than happy. Kudos to EMELGEE for his advice.

    This was the original OC thread:

    http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=199251&highlight=relay+accessory

    Pete

    [​IMG]
    #12
  13. LC8rider

    LC8rider Been here awhile

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    Preston, UK
    I fitted a 4 way fuse box near the original between the tanks. Each fuse is fed from the battery from a common rail in 30A cable, then the out going (through a fuse) feeds either equipment direct or relays which are switched by the bikes original ACC line so that certain areas can be off when the ignition is off (GPS, heated grips, aux lighting). I fitted a power socket direct from the battery into the dash and use fused plugs instead. I'd tackle as much as you can at one go, saves taking off the tanks too often to route the new loom (using abrasive proof sheathing).
    View attachment 131752
    #13
  14. morrobayboy

    morrobayboy Adventurer

    Joined:
    May 13, 2008
    Oddometer:
    32
    Having followed these posts, found excellent small auxiliary fuse panel and relay wiring kit at http://www.centechwire.com The products are their AP170R Relay Wiring Kit, and their AP-1 Auxiliary Power Fuse Panel. The directions are clear, and the biggest hint is in finding the 'ACC-2' plug in back of the headlight.

    On my '08 Adventure, it was located just above the right side peg holding on the headlight assembly. Ironically, the ACC-1 plugs are labeled, and the ACC-2 is the set without the label. For the purposes of installing the above relay and panel, the orange wire going into the relay need only connect with the 'hot' wire of the ACC-2 pair. The relay and panel have their own grounds.

    It goes really well if you take your time.
    #14
  15. Axe_Edge

    Axe_Edge In the wind 7d/wk

    Joined:
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    Morrobayboy, this is a "Stud-Warrior" find. Exactly what I was looking for. Any idea what the difference is between the AP-1 and the "boat" AP-1B? The site doesn't indicate.

    For those of you who want to have some of the power on all of the time, check out the AP-2


    #15