Wiring in a GPS

Discussion in 'Mapping & Navigation' started by kjclark7, Aug 1, 2009.

  1. kjclark7

    kjclark7 Long timer

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    being fairly new to the GS (only on week 2), i am wondering how i can hard wire in my gps (currently a garmin 276c). right now i am running off of the battery life, which by the way is 14+ hours, but i would like to be able to hard wire it direct to power. i am not very electrical savy and i don't really understand how the canbus works and how some of you guys hook up all your stuff.
    while i was checking under the front beak, i found this...
    pic 1.jpg
    behind the oil cooler. what is it exactly and can i buy a power cord to attach to it for the garmin 276c or any other gps? does that go to the canbus?
    #1
  2. kjclark7

    kjclark7 Long timer

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    is this the canbus? if not what is it? i really need someone to go over the in's and out's of the bike with me.
    pic 2.jpg
    #2
  3. Countdown

    Countdown Long timer

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    Just buy a hard wire kit form Cycoactive.com and wire it direct to the battery.
    #3
  4. Dolly Sod

    Dolly Sod Red Clay Halo

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    You can't point to the canbus without just pointing to the bike. It's all canbus.

    +1 on just wire it to your battery.
    #4
  5. John Joel Glanton

    John Joel Glanton Been here awhile

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    I have a Garmin 2610 on my V-Strom and a Garmin 60CSX on my DRZ400S. For both units, I bought the unit-specific wiring kit and then connected the wire directly to the battery using terminals similar to these:

    [​IMG]

    I soldered the connectors to the end of the wires and made them pretty with some heat-shrink tubing. Then, I ran the wire along the frame and underneath the tank, using zip ties every so often to keep the wire in place.

    If you decide to do this, be sure to leave yourself enough slack at the end that will connect to the GPS unit. It's best to start the process by first plugging the wire into the unit which is already mounted and then run the other end of the wire back to the battery so you will know where to cut it. Before you go using too many zip ties, move the handlebars to their full travel in both directions and ensure that there is no tension or tugging on the wire at the unit.

    While it's not likely that you would drain the battery, just be sure to turn the unit off or disconnect it completely once you stop riding. In my opinion, a properly soldered connection like the one pictured above and a direct connection to the battery is the simplest and most effective way to run a GPS on a bike.
    #5
  6. KRS

    KRS Sand.... My Nemesis

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    I wired mine through a relay that is only powered when the bike is on (eastern beaver's rear tail light pigtail).

    KRS
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  7. Sevoman

    Sevoman Ever Vigilant

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    #7
  8. kjclark7

    kjclark7 Long timer

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  9. Countdown

    Countdown Long timer

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    Crimp connectors should not be soldered. That causes a stress point at end of the solder wick. Good crimp connectors have a strain releif built in to eliminate this strain. Also try to run the wire under the battery hold down strap so the wire can not vibrate at the crimp.

    A motorcycle battery would run the GPS for several weeks.
    #9
  10. PaulfromPA

    PaulfromPA Adventurer

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    To piggyback on this thread... I just installed my Garmin 2820 onto my 03 SV650 using a garmin motorcycle power cord. I wired the DC to the + terminal of the battery and the other wire to the frame via a bolt at the rear brake res (the wire was labeled ground).
    [​IMG]


    I too am a complete newb to electrical wiring, so does this sound/look ok?

    Also to those that have the 2610/2720/2730/2820 streetpilots... I routed the wire along my frame and held it to the frame with modified paper clips. The clips are held on with ducttape.
    [​IMG]

    As a result, the power cord can be easily pulled away from the bike and then I can use the length of the cord to use the unit inside a tent. This is the solution to the only gripe I have with the unit... the lack of internal battery.
    #10
  11. John Joel Glanton

    John Joel Glanton Been here awhile

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    To be fair, I crimped them first and then applied the solder. I just didn't like the looks of the crimp connector and wanted to be sure that the wire would hold. Several years later, all is still well.
    #11
  12. SnowMule

    SnowMule [angry moth noises]

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    Worked with a guy years ago who used to install electronics in aircraft for NOAA. Veins in his forehead would pop out when someone would solder a crimp connector at work.:rofl

    After years of experience though, a good crimp connection is more reliable than a good solder connection; and a soldered crimp connector might as well just be wire nutted on.
    #12
  13. Countdown

    Countdown Long timer

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    Absolute violation of all NASA standards. Put it on a vibe table and it will break the wire right where the solder ends.
    #13
  14. Lead Wrist

    Lead Wrist More Gelände less Straße

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    This thread (post #7) can help you with the info related to hardwiring your GPS to GPS factory wiring harness from your GS as you pictured it (the thread is about Zumo but same applies for other GPSs):
    http://www.advrider.com/forums/showt...hlight=R1200GS :deal

    The OE plug is designed and controlled by CanBus and provides switched power, ie. it's "on" when the key is "on" in the ignition and it goes "off" 1-2 min after the key is out, to any GPS. My GPS is wired this way and never had any issues with it.

    No need to be afraid of CanBus as long as you don't cut and splice into OE wiring harness, as that's :nono :nono!! One more reason as to why GPS plug is provided by the factory for people to use it :evil !! More on the topic of pro/con of CanBus you can find over at GSpot forum, dedicated to GS bikes.

    As for your second picture and wondering what that block is, even though the location of it has changed on your bike relative to my 07 Adv, that appears to be fuse block for your fog lights. If you open it, you should be able to find 2x 7.5A fuses in it...



    Hope above helps and enjoy your wrenchin' :thumb :thumb !!
    #14
  15. Dolly Sod

    Dolly Sod Red Clay Halo

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    When's your bike scheduled for launch?
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  16. Countdown

    Countdown Long timer

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    Only takes 8 minutes to make orbit, most of my bike rides last 10-16 hours. Vibe and shock levels are similar, NASA quality may not be good enough.

    The Auto industry requires much higher reliability than the Military.
    #16
  17. Dolly Sod

    Dolly Sod Red Clay Halo

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    You may want to think about getting your bike tuned up.
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  18. kjclark7

    kjclark7 Long timer

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    lead wrist,
    thank you for answering the questionn i originally posted.
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  19. John Joel Glanton

    John Joel Glanton Been here awhile

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    Man, you're harsh! I believe you about my wiring being non-NASA but....dang....what are you...some kind of electrical engineer? :jjen

    The reason I did what I did on the connectors is because I wanted a big enough "eye" that would fit the battery terminals but which I could still get that thin little wire into. So, I stripped the wire down, folded it a few times until it "filled" the connecter, crimped it, then soldered it, then put heat-shrink tubing on it.

    With my non-NASA-compliant GPS wiring, I rode my bike over 4,000 miles in this trip from Texas to Idaho, Washington, Oregon, and Utah some of it on dirt. Before that, I rode my bike all over Colorado which included a lot of dirt, rough roads, and washboard. So far, it's still working fine. :ksteve

    BTW: I think we may both be flirting with thread crapping now. Thanks for the advice and I'm glad the OP got his original question answered. Bye.
    #19