With all this talk about filtering and lane splitting in the US...what would it take?

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by LuciferMutt, Jan 17, 2013.

  1. Falconx84

    Falconx84 Lurker

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    I can't imagine a local ordinance saying you can't to it. Just has to be worded like a PSA... just like the "Watch for impaired drivers" type signs. They aren't endorsing driving impaired, just that statistically speaking there will be a certain number who are.

    As long as it doesn't announce that its legal to split/filter and just says "watch for filtering," you should be good to go.

    EDIT: on privately owned billboards/ property. I don't think we can get away with manufacturing our own street signs
    #61
  2. dwoodward

    dwoodward Long timer

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    That's what I meant when I said:



    Finally? That page has been there, one form or another, for over a decade.
    #62
  3. p0diabl0

    p0diabl0 Been here awhile

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    Not to mention the CHP are one of the main reasons we have lane splitting in CA - so they could do it on their air cooled bikes and not overheat and die in traffic.
    #63
  4. Ginger Beard

    Ginger Beard I have no soul

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    It seems to be a stigma that "they" have chosen to impose upon themselves. I have had "them" do it to me. Luckily I know how to lane split so I did it again at the next light and they went away. They can be angry all they'd like as long as they do it way back there. :D
    #64
  5. randyo

    randyo Long timer

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    it would be different in every state

    the state generally regulates signs on state highways, but there may be local regulation that supercedes

    here in NH, county govt is weak, but most towns regulate signs , every municipality has there own regulations. and actual construction of a sign can be as easy as built it, or get a building permit first, proceedures on getting a sign building permit can be anything from a simple appplication and fee to a 6 month public hearing process depending on where you are

    in other words, even more complicated than just going to every state legislature with lobbying effortsto begin with
    #65
  6. randyo

    randyo Long timer

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    you haven't imagined many local ordinances have you

    I make a living getting people thru the process of obtaining land use permits (sign permits are just one of the many things)
    #66
  7. wiseblood

    wiseblood Hall Monitor

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    This! :nod

    That is my "secret" strategy. Here in NYC, about three years ago a handful of riders including myself started a motorcycle advocacy group. (NYMSTF.org, FYI.) Our general feeling was that we were tired of being "represented" by "MRO"-type groups -- Motorcycle "RIGHTS" Organizations which generally do nothing except whine about helmet laws and any proposal which might prohibit their asinine, ear-splitting straight pipes.

    Our basic premise was this: We believe that there is a silent MAJORITY of riders who just like to ride. We're adults, professionals, fathers & mothers, and the only reason most non-riders don't realize we're in the majority is because we DON'T have loud pipes, and we're NOT popping wheelies on the way home from work.

    So, my "secret" strategy is this: I think that if I can make main-stream motorcycling SO popular and convenient that everybody's mother is doing it, then the element which does it to be "rebellious" will lose interest. I call it the Chinpokomon strategy, BTW. :evil

    [​IMG]

    It's gonna take a little while, I think. :D
    #67
  8. Grinnin

    Grinnin Forever N00b

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    Yes and yes.

    Being recognized as useful transportation is key. But the reality is that motorcycling is a pain in the patootie once one puts on overpants, jacket, earplugs, helmet, and gloves at every stop. Even if you simplify that to helmet and gloves, the SUV can run a loop of errands including any kind of lumber, pets, kids, and a new flat-screen TV that would be a bit more troublesome on a motorcycle.

    It's not impossible, but the car is more convenient and the pickup or SUV are more convenient than the car.

    Motorcycling is for those who enjoy it. We will adapt to the inconvenience and accept the risks.

    The result is that we will be a minority until change is imposed upon us by the cost of gas or other forces.
    #68
  9. wiseblood

    wiseblood Hall Monitor

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    I dunno about you, but I don't frequently need to get lumber or a flat screen TV.

    I have a car, and I have a bike. In average, for the past few years, I've put about 13,000 miles / year on the bike. On average, I put about 8,300 on the car.

    I don't think I'm the norm, HOWEVER a few thoughts:

    • I live in the Northeast -- where today it is currently a balmy 20.8F. :vardy
    • Nonetheless, I commute in on a bike, every day unless there's ice/snow on the ground. (Or, like today when I had to get the car inspected. :bluduh)
    • On weekends, I do about 75% of my errands on the bike.
    • I live in an urban area (NYC), so whatever time it takes to get my gear on is MUCH MORE than offset by the amount of time it would take to find PARKING for the car.
    #69
  10. jfurf

    jfurf Been here awhile

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    Motorcycles will always be the minority, of course, but don't discount how convenient motorcycles (and scooters) are in large, crowded cities. Motorcycles here can use the HOV lane, which is a significant benefit if you've ever ridden any of Atlanta's freeways at rush hour (or hell, anytime really). Plus it's MUCH easier to find a place to park (and scooters can just be chained to sign posts or parking meters on the sidewalk).

    Lifestyles are changing. The baby boomer era of big yards way out in the burbs is coming to an end. Nowadays a lot more people want to live in urban areas rather than in spread-out suburbs. I think in the next 20 years there's going to be a HUGE growth in the number of people using electric scooters and motorcycles to get around town.

    I see this as the best of both worlds. Electric bikes will be incredibly cheap to own/operate and great for commuting and short trips, while conventional bikes will still be used for touring and sport riding.
    #70
  11. windmill

    windmill Long timer

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    I think filtering and splitting should be legal, I'm not arguing against it but would like to point out a few real problems.

    Infrastructure,
    We allow vehicles to be wider than in most countries, 102". Many states have narrower lanes, while California typically uses 14' lanes, many states in the east half of the country use 12' lanes, sometimes in the east coast it can be as little as 10'.

    Image,
    Most non riders think of pirates and squids when they think of motorcycles, to them we are just a bunch of immature twats playing with toys. Noise, high beams, road blocking parades, high speed antics, stunting,. We are a tiny minority with a huge image issue.................and most of the negativity is accurate.........why do anything for us?

    Our own worst enemy,
    How many riders claim they do it all the time even though its illegal, as if thousands of people don't see it and don't know its illegal.
    If it were to be made legal, how long would it take before the public regretted it?


    Unfortunately, I think it would be easier to get the non riding public to initially accept splitting and filtering, than it would be to keep some riders from abusing it.
    #71
  12. vaara

    vaara Been here awhile

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    That's what Zipcar is for.
    #72
  13. Grinnin

    Grinnin Forever N00b

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    I would like to stand corrected. Both Wiseblood and jfurf make good points about how 2-wheels may be more convenient in places.
    I put over 19,000 on 3 motorcycles in 2012 and 3,360 on my car. And I DO frequently need lumber, but that and the TV were just examples. I ride in spite of the inconvenience.

    Change of tactic: Is it possible to convince traffic engineers to convince legislators that filtering is beneficial? Bypass the populace entirely?
    #73
  14. rocker59

    rocker59 diplomatico di moto

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    Do you really believe that?
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  15. RxZ

    RxZ Legal Drug Dealer

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    I do not. At least not here in Texas. D/FW, Houston, Austin, San Antonio. They just keep spreading out. Even my town of 100K has doubled in population and probably size in the past 15 years.
    #75
  16. dwoodward

    dwoodward Long timer

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    How many drivers that see a rider lane-split past a) know it's illegal and b) are mad because they wish they could do it?

    Because right now there are two levels of self-selection to get to lane-splitting: First, take the extra step to learn how to ride; then take the extra step to twitch half a lane one way or the other and keep going when traffic backs up.

    Having already self-selected (twice) as a risk taker, it's easy to do it again and get into the adrenaline rush from doing it fast.

    Go to where it's crowded, and scooters outnumber cars about 100:1, and you don't see it the way you do here.

    When riding is more an accepted lifestyle instead of a risky pastime, it'll be easier for lanesplitting to get accepted.
    #76
  17. rocker59

    rocker59 diplomatico di moto

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    I predict the advancing glaciers will cover North America again, before that happens.
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  18. Gummee!

    Gummee! That's MR. Toothless

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    In my case, unless I *really* effed up, there was no adrenalin. Just another day of riding in traffic. :nod

    M
    #78
  19. Ginger Beard

    Ginger Beard I have no soul

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    Sounds like it's pretty bad up there in WA. Most riders here are just regular people that use an mc for transportation and ride pretty darn respectfully.

    With regards to people lane splitting/filtering illegally I agree with them doing it. When legality stands in the way of safety I see no need to obey the law. It's far easier to deal with a court than a coroner. I understand that some people may become angry with riders doing this but it tends to be people that are either ignorant or driven simply by emotion and ego. Neither group is worth consideration.
    #79
  20. Mgbgt89

    Mgbgt89 Long timer

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    Well put.
    #80