Woodpile/Woodstove Pics with your bike/dog - How do you heat your house/bike storage? Winter travel.

Discussion in 'Northeast - Greater Flugistan and home of the carp' started by Sno Dawg, Nov 14, 2016.

  1. Sno Dawg

    Sno Dawg Long timer

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    For the past three winters, I have thought about starting a thread involving how ADV Riders in the Northeast keep their house(bike storage) heated. I imagined that without a tie-in to motorcycling, the thread would get booted to the basement pretty quickly. So I took pictures of my wood pile this year with my bike in front of it.

    Question: How do you heat?

    If you heat with wood:
    Please take a picture of your woodpile with your bike in front of it.

    What type of stove?
    How much do you burn?
    How do you store your wood?
    What type of woods do you burn?
    How long have you been heating with wood?
    Pictures and descriptions of splitting methods and/or tools.

    I will start -
    What type of stove? We have a Vermont Castings stove that takes a 23 inch log
    How much do you burn? We burn about 3 to 4 cords a year
    How do you store your wood? Stored stacked with sides open - see pictures
    What type of woods do you burn? Mostly oak, ash, cherry, mulberry
    How long have you been heating with wood? This is my 20th winter heating 100% with wood
    Pictures and descriptions of splitting methods and/or tools.
    34 ton Iron and Oak splitter. Several splitting mauls - Gransfors Bruks long handle and short handle for kindling.


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    #1
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  2. docgonzo

    docgonzo Old Gadfly

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    Lived in Vermont for 10 years. Heated an old farm house for the entire time with one big, and one little wood stove. Here's one of them.
    [​IMG]
    Split, stacked and burned 10 cord of wood a year. Actually had an entire truck-load of full length trees delivered to my backyard, then spent the entire summer splitting and stacking. Never had to go to the gym during those 10 years.

    Now, I heat with gas and just turn the thermostat up when it's cold! In tropical New Jersey!:jack

    p.s., all men talked about at parties for the 10 years I was in Vermont was their wood piles. Boring.:lol2
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  3. flei

    flei cycletherapist

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    my favorite poem fits here.....

    Regarding Chainsaws

    Hayden Carruth
    The first chainsaw I owned was years ago,
    an old yellow McCulloch that wouldn’t start.
    Bo Bremmer give it to me that was my friend,
    though I’ve had enemies couldn’t of done
    no worse. I took it to Ward’s over to Morrisville,
    and no doubt they tinkered it as best they could,
    but it still wouldn’t start. One time later
    I took it down to the last bolt and gasket
    and put it together again, hoping somehow
    I’d do something accidental-like that would
    make it go, and then I yanked on it
    450 times, as I figured afterwards,
    and give myself a bursitis in the elbow
    that went five years even after
    Doc Arrowsmith shot it full of cortisone
    and near killed me when he hit a nerve
    dead on. Old Stan wanted that saw, wanted it bad.
    Figured I was a greenhorn that didn’t know
    nothing and he could fix it. Well, I was,
    you could say, being only forty at the time,
    but a fair hand at tinkering. “Stan," I said,
    “you’re a neighbor. I like you. I wouldn’t
    sell that thing to nobody, except maybe
    Vice-President Nixon.” But Stan persisted.
    He always did. One time we was loafing and
    gabbing in his front dooryard, and he spied
    that saw in the back of my pickup. He run
    quick inside, then come out and stuck a double
    sawbuck in my shirt pocket, and he grabbed
    that saw and lugged it off. Next day, when I
    drove past, I seen he had it snugged down tight
    with a tow-chain on the bed of his old Dodge
    Powerwagon, and he was yanking on it
    with both hands. Two or three days after,
    I asked him, “How you getting along with that
    McCulloch, Stan?” “Well," he says, “I tooken
    it down to scrap, and I buried it in three
    separate places yonder on the upper side
    of the potato piece. You can’t be too careful,"
    he says, “when you’re disposing of a hex.”
    The next saw I had was a godawful ancient
    Homelite that I give Dry Dryden thirty bucks for,
    temperamental as a ram too, but I liked it.
    It used to remind me of Dry and how he’d
    clap that saw a couple times with the flat
    of his double-blade axe to make it go
    and how he honed the chain with a worn-down
    file stuck in an old baseball. I worked
    that saw for years. I put up forty-five
    run them days each summer and fall to keep
    my stoves het through the winter. I couldn’t now.
    It’d kill me. Of course they got these here
    modern Swedish saws now that can take
    all the worry out of it. What’s the good
    of that? Takes all the fun out too, don’t it?
    Why, I reckon. I mind when Gilles Boivin snagged
    an old sap spout buried in a chunk of maple
    and it tore up his mouth so bad he couldn’t play
    “Tea for Two” on his cornet in the town band
    no more, and then when Toby Fox was holding
    a beech limb that Rob Bowen was bucking up
    and the saw skidded crossways and nipped off
    one of Toby’s fingers. Ain’t that more like it?
    Makes you know you’re living. But mostly they wan’t
    dangerous, and the only thing they broke was your
    back. Old Stan, he was a buller and a jammer
    in his time, no two ways about that, but he
    never sawed himself. Stan had the sugar
    all his life, and he wan’t always too careful
    about his diet and the injections. He lost
    all the feeling in his legs from the knees down.
    One time he started up his Powerwagon
    out in the barn, and his foot slipped off the clutch,
    and she jumped forwards right through the wall
    and into the manure pit. He just set there,
    swearing like you could of heard it in St.
    Johnsbury, till his wife come out and said,
    “Stan, what’s got into you?” “Missus," he says
    “ain’t nothing got into me. Can’t you see?
    It’s me that’s got into this here pile of shit.”
    Not much later they took away one of his
    legs, and six months after that they took
    the other and left him setting in his old chair
    with a tank of oxygen to sip at whenever
    he felt himself sinking. I remember that chair.
    Stan reupholstered it with an old bearskin
    that must of come down from his great-great-
    grandfather and had grit in it left over
    from the Civil War and a bullet-hole as big
    as a yawning cat. Stan latched the pieces together
    with rawhide, cross fashion, but the stitches was
    always breaking and coming undone. About then
    I quit stopping by to see old Stan, and I
    don’t feel so good about that neither. But my mother
    was having her strokes then. I figured
    one person coming apart was as much
    as a man can stand. Then Stan was taken away
    to the nursing home, and then he died. I always
    remember how he planted them pieces of spooked
    McCulloch up above the potatoes. One time
    I went up and dug, and I took the old
    sprocket, all pitted and et away, and set it
    on the windowsill right there next to the
    butter mold. But I’m damned if I know why.
    #3
  4. Sno Dawg

    Sno Dawg Long timer

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    Hey Doc - that old Fisher is a nice one and I can bet those two Springers are living large on the heat. My German Wirehair puts his head under my stove and falls asleep. I can't believe his brain doesn't boil, but he does it all of the time. After about 45 minutes he gets up, panting and walks to his water bowl and drinks about a half bowl. Then it is back to the stove. ahhhhhh a dog's life.

    Sno Dawg
    #4
  5. ballpeen

    ballpeen _______________

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    Timely thread. I just added about a cord to my stash this afternoon, looked at my phone and you'd posted this thread. I installed a Lopi 1750 a couple years ago and now run my regular forced air heat a fraction of what I use to. Burn about 4-5 cords a season, and, um, er, get my wood from others due to my small yard and working area. My pack of three dogs love it. Particularly the chihuahua.

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]
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  6. flei

    flei cycletherapist

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    I can't get a photo by the woodpiles; i have put the bike in storage for winter. Use 4 cords a year, burning in a Hearthstone Mansfield 8012 stove; we love this stove. Mostly purchase my wood, already cut and split. Cut my own (with a Stihl Farmboss) when I need to take down a tree. Split it with a 24ton hydraulic I bought from Northern Tool. Stored in a woodshed. Been heating with wood for about 30 years.
    #6
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  7. docgonzo

    docgonzo Old Gadfly

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    Here's my present set up (an old Jotul that can be used as an open fireplace or closed as a wood stove). Was able to heat my entire house for two weeks during Sandy. Also had hot water and a stove that worked because of the before-mentioned gas!

    [​IMG]
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  8. Sno Dawg

    Sno Dawg Long timer

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    Hey Ballpeen,
    That is a clean looking pile of wood and a really happy chihuahua! - also some nice bluestone on the patio!

    Nothing better than working outdoors and coming in to a wood stove with a cold beer!

    Sno Dawg
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  9. Sno Dawg

    Sno Dawg Long timer

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    Is that a Jotul?

    A buddy of mine bought a stove like that off of ebay and asked me to help him move it. It was in some guys back yard sunk about 6 inches deep in mud. Holy crap was that thing heavy! He cleaned it up, replaced the gaskets, painted it and now it is in his friends shop in Cheltenham warming his tree guys up.

    Nice picture!

    Sno Dawg
    #9
  10. docgonzo

    docgonzo Old Gadfly

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    And, here's my "woodpile":

    [​IMG]


    A nice set-up, because my father-in-law (who's 87!) still loves to split wood. So he checks the bin every week and makes sure it's full. Very efficient! :-)
    #10
  11. flei

    flei cycletherapist

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    Dogs love stoves!
    [​IMG]
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  12. docgonzo

    docgonzo Old Gadfly

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    Yes.... see my edit of the picture post. And thanks. Love that stove!
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  13. docgonzo

    docgonzo Old Gadfly

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    Warning to you "flat-landers". If you are using your stoves on a regular basis, and burn more then a couple of cords of wood a winter, you better keep a close watch on the creosote build-up in the chimney. Chimney fires can take a house out.

    Also, don't put the ashes in a cardboard box, even if they are a few days old. One of my friends in Vermont burned his house down by putting the ashes on the porch. In a cardboard box!:eekers
    #13
  14. flei

    flei cycletherapist

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    Cats love stoves.
    [​IMG]
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  15. Sno Dawg

    Sno Dawg Long timer

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    Great advice Doc!!

    If you burn dry wood and never pine, your chimney will be happier!!
    I bought an aluminum trashcan for my ashes and I store it away from the house. In the Spring, I sprinkle the ashes on my wife's garden!
    #15
  16. flei

    flei cycletherapist

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    Dogs AND cats love stoves.
    [​IMG]
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  17. Sno Dawg

    Sno Dawg Long timer

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    That's hilarious. I just showed my wife the pics of your cats and she laughed! When we had a redbone coonhound and a german shorthair, they would battle for the spot closet to the wood stove - never any fights, but some growling went on.
    #17
  18. flei

    flei cycletherapist

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    That's String Bean on his back; he is King Of The House here, and the dogs, his sister and us humans know it!
    #18
  19. Sno Dawg

    Sno Dawg Long timer

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    That's a great looking Brittany!!
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  20. flei

    flei cycletherapist

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    Thanks! She's sweet and smart, as well as beautiful. Her Dad's a Brittany and her Mom's a Llewellin. Her birding instincts are just amazing to see. She was a "rescue dog" at 1.5 yrs.. She was trained to hunt and never was in a house before we got her; she had a lot to learn but she learned it fast. She adds a lot to our family.
    #20