Woodpile/Woodstove Pics with your bike/dog - How do you heat your house/bike storage? Winter travel.

Discussion in 'Northeast - Greater Flugistan and home of the carp' started by Sno Dawg, Nov 14, 2016.

  1. The Haymaker

    The Haymaker Testing Newtons Laws......

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    Felt ambitious today......

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  2. Sno Dawg

    Sno Dawg Long timer

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  3. The Haymaker

    The Haymaker Testing Newtons Laws......

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    Well.... hopefully......

    I was "done" until that pile of maple "fell" into my lap.

    Now to figure out how to keep it from rotting before I get to it.

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  4. Sno Dawg

    Sno Dawg Long timer

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    That is a gorgeous picture!
    Like money in the bank - thanks for sharing.

    Sno Dawg
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  5. The Haymaker

    The Haymaker Testing Newtons Laws......

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    Taken same time as these around sunrise this morning.

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    Mice like maple......

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  6. Sno Dawg

    Sno Dawg Long timer

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    That is such nice lighting. I think we are all lucky to be able to get outside in this weather and play with firewood. My dog follows me around and picks up the kindling pieces. This is exactly why winter is my favorite season!

    Sno Dawg
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  7. jdub

    jdub Dawg bytes reel gud

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    Just found this thread, and thought I'd add a few pics.

    Because my old method of stacking wood between trees usually resulted in them collapsing at some point, after doing a Google search for better ideas I came upon the Holzhausen method a few years ago. Each one I built got better, and now I can build symmetrical and stable ones containing about two cord of wood in about an hour. This may have been mentioned previously in the thread, but I haven't read all 25 pages.

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    Every time I'm out cutting, splitting or stacking wood, my chocolate Lab turns into a thief. She runs in, grabs a piece of wood, runs away and starts gnawing on it.

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  8. Mac Ka

    Mac Ka Been here awhile

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    My pooch helps add to the wood pile.


    [​IMG]


    .......and then he sits all day in front of the fire....

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  9. Sno Dawg

    Sno Dawg Long timer

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    Hey Mac Ka -
    For some reason i can't see your pictures anymore.

    Sno Dawg
  10. BMgreenmt

    BMgreenmt Been here awhile

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    I wanna know how they don’t get splinters in their mouth? Must be dog zen power?
  11. haystack

    haystack Just ride

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    image.jpg
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  12. Sno Dawg

    Sno Dawg Long timer

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    Now that is a great pic of a happy family warming by the woodstove on a rainy day!!!

    Thanks for sharing.

    Jeff

    One thing that is interesting is that your German Shepherd looks like he want to eat your cat! ha ha
  13. Tallbastid

    Tallbastid Brapp

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    Question for you wood stove guys. I live in a ~1,500 square foot ranch, with a full basement which doubles as my workshop. We're putting in a wood stove in the spring. I'm thinking I'd like to stick it in the basement, as it can easily be plumbed into our existing chimney. Also, the basement is very open so pushing the hot air around would be easy with a few fans. Not to mention, warm floors in the living areas would be incredible, and my nephews wouldn't be playing near a hot wood stove.

    Only concern is it becoming uncomfortably warm in my wood shop and having to lug the firewood downstairs yor get old I assume. The alternative here is to just stick it in my living room which walks out to our back porch. Any thoughts?
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  14. Sno Dawg

    Sno Dawg Long timer

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    Woodstove - great choice!!!

    My opinion - for what it's worth....
    In your living room it might create a nice family gathering space. You can always get a gate that goes around it until the kids get older. It also provides a great teaching tool as to creating and keeping a fire going because you can involve kids in the process of gathering wood, carrying it, lighting it and sustaining the fire with flue control. You can also teach them types of wood, whittling (shavings make for good kindling and knives make for great presents for kids) and this is a great excuse for a camping trip of an outside fire pit. My brother's son is fascinated by making the fire, cutting kindling on his knees (safer with short handled axe which is the coolest present ever) and lighting the fire. If you introduce it correctly, you might not have to do any work except for supervising. The one big question is does it have a glass door on it so you can watch the fire? The other cool thing about the woodstove in the living room is that if you get in to it, you can heat water for tea/coffee and make soup, bacon and eggs, etc..

    In your basement it is out of sight and might keep your house cleaner from dust, but you can't enjoy it. I would imagine that it would get old going up and down stairs to bring in wood and feed it especially as you get older (twist an ankle). I bet you would not use it as much in the basement because you might get tired of the hassle. Our stove is in our living room in the middle of the house and our floor plan is wide open because it is a timberframe. There are many nights in the winter that I get home from work and coaching, light a fire, pour a glass of wine or grab a beer and sit in front of it for a couple of hours - never turning on the TV. The dog curls up at my feet and we both gaze in to the flames like primordial beasts - ha ha.

    Unknown.jpeg about $100 - $150 on amazon

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    Picture of my brother and me teaching his son how to split kindling with some dry straight-grained maple. We cooked dinner over the fire in a dutch oven and spent the night outside at our cabin telling stories. We have four or five "Dude Weekends" a year with his son where we try to spend as much time in the woods as possible, hiking, four wheeling, riding motorcycles, shooting guns, paddling canoes, chopping wood, cooking etc.. I guess my point is that every day starts and ends with us making a fire and his son is great at it - in even in wet conditions.

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    Sno Dawg
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  15. Sno Dawg

    Sno Dawg Long timer

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  16. docgonzo

    docgonzo Old Gadfly

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    Kids and woodstoves:
    My oldest helped me heat my house in Vermont for 10 years. It didn’t take them long to realize the stove was hot. Isually one time!
    They HATED the sweat and the bugs during the summer working the pile and the splitter, but learned the reward for hard work.
    They also learned how to use a splitting mall. A skill that comes in handy at fairs when you want to ring the bell on the hammer slam!
    As far as basement stoves go, the old farmhouse in Vermont (built in 1789) had free air registers that allowed the heat to get upstairs. Basically, holes in the floor with grates on them.
    1889 (100 years old):
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    1989 (200 years old):
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    Heated solely with two woodstoves for those 10 years. 10 cord each winter.
    Found out why settlers wore nightcaps! By the morning, we could see our breaths as the stoves died down!!!
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  17. flei

    flei cycletherapist

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    My house is a center chimney Cape built in 1742. It is not well insulated. We heat with wood (usually 4 cords) with propane back-up. The upstairs is dormered, and is heated by 2 grates in the floor. These work so well that we often have to close them as it gets too hot upstairs. We can keep the downstairs between 70-80F no matter how cold it is outside. We love wood heat and will use it until we are physically incapable of doing so (which hopefully will be never).
  18. tjzondrz

    tjzondrz Non-Nefarious

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    I would put it in the basement if you have an outside door to enter the basement, but they are real nice in the living area. You might want to rethink about hooking the woodstove flue into an existing chimney that is being used by a gas or oil furnace/boiler. It just might be illegal/unlawful in the area you reside in. And its just not a good idea.
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  19. docgonzo

    docgonzo Old Gadfly

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    Well, we prided ourselves on having the largest icicles in the neighborhood because of the lack of insulation on our Vermont '89. No space to blow fiberglass in the walls. Only place to put it was in the attic. That didn't help enough. I think that 6 cords of wood went to heating the house, and 4 cords of wood went to heating the air AROUND the house! But is was a fun 10 years!
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  20. Sno Dawg

    Sno Dawg Long timer

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    Yes, stairs and firewood are a pain. If you can't get a wheelbarrow full of wood close to the stove - ahhhhh

    Tallbastid
    Please keep us posted as to which route you go and post pics of your set up.

    Sno Dawg
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