Worldtrip with 1190 Adventure R - Technical Preparations

Discussion in 'Ridiculous streetbikes with 6 CPUs and too much HP' started by AdventureLeo, May 11, 2013.

  1. AdventureLeo

    AdventureLeo Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2011
    Oddometer:
    134
    Location:
    Worldwide
    Hi there!

    Finally the decision is made! I will start a motorbike world trip this year in September. I just bought the new KTM 1190 Adventure R bike for the journey. Can't wait to hit the road. Hopefully the necessary tires will be available by beginning of this journey and the electronics will not trouble me in any kind...

    The trip will start in South America!!! :clap

    So there I am right now.

    I have to get the motorbike ready for the shipping to Valpariso Chile. I have another 2.5 months left. Everything else is already done. Paperwork etc.

    From my point of view there are no special upgrades necessary on the bike. KTM is really awesome. Everything is exactlly how I would it expect to be on a adventure bike. The only things I will add ... 1. the Touratech engine protection and 2. the Touratech Zega Pro cases! 3. a GPS System (not decided yet)

    Now my questions!
    1. Any recommendations about things I should check before I start the trip. Any known problems yet?
    2. I would like to install the Zega cases 31L and 38L boxes, since I got them for my previous bike (KTM 690) already. On the exhaust side the little Zega box sticks out so far from the bike. I was thinking about to get a smaller exhaust to get the boxes closer to the bike! The TT frame can be cut an welded again. Did someone ever try this? In Germany there is onle the Akrapovic exhaust available, that is not much smaller - so no option.
    Since I didn't get the TT frame for the boxes yet I don't know the width of the whole setup. If anyone has a number for me theat would be nice.
    3. How would you protect the bike from theft?
    4. I had good experience with the standard tools that come with all the KTM bikes! Any recommendations to bring along besides the kit?
    5. Does it make sense to install tube tires? (rim form the Superenduro maybe)

    That's it so far!
    #1
  2. Hondo

    Hondo What if it's a Samsquamch?

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2006
    Oddometer:
    13,014
    Location:
    Front Range, CO
    See inserted comments-
    #2
  3. Lion BR

    Lion BR I'd rather be riding

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2005
    Oddometer:
    4,625
    Location:
    Oregon
    I can only respond to a few of your questions and offer an alternative to Hondo's good responses:

    2. Cases/Boxes: I would prefer to instal smaller instead of the biggest boxes available. The more space you have, the more you load your bike with things you won't need. If you buy things along the way, souvenirs and things like that, ship them home. Keep it light and it will be a more enjoyable ride on all aspects of what riding is all about.

    3 Bike Protection: Along with Hondo's suggestion, I would also recommend a bike cover. Somehow it makes the bike "disappear". Hopefully you will be able to stay in places where they offer storage or sometimes I've read of hotels that let you park your bike in unusual places, indoors.

    5. Tube or not Tube, that is the question: I prefer tubeless, as the bike comes from factory. Tubeless makes road side fixes of a flat a much easier job, and faster, and you may want faster in some circumstances. Carry tubes with you on a just in case. As a matter of fact, you can carry a 21 tube, and it will fit the rear wheel in case of emergency (tire is beyond plug repair) until you get a new tire (or a proper 18 tube for the rear).
    #3
  4. CRW

    CRW I dont want a pickle

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2005
    Oddometer:
    788
    Location:
    Cotati Ca. USA
    i dont see the kickstand re locator.
    But i don't know if it applies to the 1190.

    Ride the piss out of the bike before you leave.......

    And plus one on all the above suggestions.
    #4
  5. mousitsas

    mousitsas Long timer

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2008
    Oddometer:
    3,349
    Location:
    Athens, Greece
    Ι would stick with the stock tubeless and wide rims. You will prolong tyre life and make fixes easy.
    The stock SE rims are better offroad, but could cost you your bike (or even your life) if you have a flat at high speed. They don't have a safety bead which means that the tyre is instantly off the rim if/when it deflates.
    #5
  6. Motorfiets

    Motorfiets Long timer

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2007
    Oddometer:
    3,000
    Location:
    Southern California
    [​IMG]



    buy this.... best money you can spend....

    Before I left on my RTW trip I was told... anyone can go around the world! It's the language barrier that you will struggle with! With this book you can point to a "banana" (or anything for that matter!!) and no matter what language the other person speak they know what a banana looks like... best thing you can buy for yourself besides gas

    anyways....

    Panniers... I would avoid aluminum cases... they are big, heavy, breakable, wide... they just plain suck! The first time you fall the cases WILL bend and while in the middle of no where you will be using a rock to bang them back into place. I don't care how strong TT claims the cases are... they WILL bend amd break. Another issue of hard bags is the pure width... lane splitting is something that makes motorcycling wonderful in third world countries. with massive bags sticking out you would be limited. Hard bags allow people to pack so much JUNK. I would reccomend soft bags. They are light, simple, slim... overall easier! Coming from someone who's been around the world... pack light! if you go with hard panniers... leave with one empty... TRUST ME!! you would be suprised how quicly you start filling your bag with things along the way. Also in Mongolia I fell in the sand and my leg was pinned underneath the pannier case... was not a nice feeling! Had I not meant some fellow travelers a couple days before, I don't know how long I would have been there if they didn't help get the bike off me. I would highly reccomend read some of Colebatch's stories. He give you a great idea of what you need and what you don't!

    Tools!!! a hammer is a hammer.... that hammer is the same tool whether you live in South America, Mongolia or even Anartica... I say that because many people bring the entire household including the kitchen sink when traveling... I can not express enough how much you don't need all the stuff! Best approach I have found for creating a tool kit is to work on the bike on your own (teaches you to be self supportive)! What to do is keep all your tools out and all over the floor after working on the bike... pack all the tools you used out on the table. Go through and decide what tools were repeats, lazy tools (like a powered screwdriver when a manual would do the same job) , and then essential tools.... then pack those in your tool kit. A way to test this approach would be to do an overnight camping trip... while gone do an oil change, change tires... preform some basic maintence on the bike... if you have all the tools you have a good toolkit. Then once home unpack your tools and decide what you didn't use can you remove from your kit?
    #6
  7. Motorfiets

    Motorfiets Long timer

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2007
    Oddometer:
    3,000
    Location:
    Southern California
    work computer is being silly....

    GPS... two words... Garmin Montana
    hands down best GPS you can buy!

    Bike Theft!? :rofl your bike is WAY to heavy to be carried off! Just buy a simple cheapo bike like... It's more to to keep the honest people honest... In 25,000 miles the only "theft" I had was the local Police! stole my friends gps... :huh we ended up getting it back with the help of the locals however...

    Tires... Bring ONE spare 21" tube... and then LEARN how to patch a tire... I see way too many people these days that have no idea how to repair a tube other than replacing it... I personally would get a punture a during my trip and swap it for my spare... that night I would then repair the tube I swapped and then had it ready for the next flat. I probably had 3-4 patches per tube....


    Last bit of advice... it takes 5 hp to get around the world... the rest is just wheel spin... leave with one pannier empty (TRUST ME!!!!!!!)... stop often.... take many pictures...

    if you happen to be coming thru TN you have a oil change, free bed, hot shower, and cold beer for ya.....
    #7
  8. Moronic

    Moronic Long timer

    Joined:
    May 16, 2006
    Oddometer:
    2,146
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    I think a couple of posters up there read "1190" as "990" (or perhaps even "950")

    Good luck with the trip. :yum
    #8
  9. ciedema

    ciedema мотоциклист

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2007
    Oddometer:
    2,161
    Location:
    Brisbane
    GPS +1 to the above Garmin Montana.

    Toolkit - the only thing I would suggest is changing out the open end spanners for ring/open end combo's, a good ring spanner is a little kinder to bolt heads and add some needle nose pliers and tyre repair stuff.
    #9
  10. AdventureLeo

    AdventureLeo Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2011
    Oddometer:
    134
    Location:
    Worldwide
    Hello everyone!

    Just to make it clear! I bought a 1190. ;-)

    http://www.ktm.com/de/travel/1190-adventure-r-eu/highlights.html#.UY_KWcplFwI

    So all the parts succested for the 990 will probably not fit the KTM I have. The tires are tubeless and using tubes is not possible since the back rim has the hole for the air in dislocated from the center. In Germany there is no offroad tire available yet. But they say there will be soon a selection. I just hope that dealers in SA also have this tires in stock. Otherwise it will be expensive to get them shipped to SA! Any experiences there! Maybe there is some other 1190 driver around that has some information about this.

    Ciedema: Tire repair stuff is on my list! I will check the tools once I got the machine (next week) and then I will change the necessary tools if I don't like them. ;-)

    Motorfiets: Also here - It doesn't make sense to bring any tube. The tires are tubeless. And there is no chance to use tubes on the rims (see above). I hope this is not a huge disadvantage! Since it is one of the first bikes with tubeless offroad tires there is not much to read about it. Generally tubeless tires are easier to fix. But it will be impossible to change the tires with standard tools. I have to make a prober planning about tire deales in advance I guess. But for all the GS Boxer riders this is the same. They are als riding Tubeless since years. Sorry but what is TN?

    Abou the Panniers. Since I already got the TT Zega Cases and TT is also sponsoring me a little there is no other option for me for other cases. It will be the Zega Cases. I just need to find out how exactly I mount them on the bike for it's best.

    Mousitsas: Thanks for the info! I will stick to the tubeless.

    Lion BR: I will think about the cover - but I guess it will not make it into my box - because of space.

    Hondo: Sorry - it's another bike. . .


    I don't know if there are any South America KTM riders in the Forum. But any information about the situation in concerns to KTM would be a big help for me.

    I decided to ride the 1190 and by that I also took the risk of not knowing much about problems that come with the bike. In German Forums some people say it's too much of electronics involved. But well - I guess all new bikes are like that. Personally I never had problems with this. I just hope the doupting people will not have right at the end... I am a little bit unsure in this matter.... :hmmmmm

    Greeetings from Germany
    #10
  11. pebble35

    pebble35 Long timer

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2007
    Oddometer:
    1,893
    Location:
    Jersey, Channel Islands
    How about an extended sidestand foot and alloy reinforced handguards to save your levers in the event of an off
    #11
  12. pebble35

    pebble35 Long timer

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2007
    Oddometer:
    1,893
    Location:
    Jersey, Channel Islands
    Waht ill fuel quality be like ? I guess you will need to be able to cope with poor fuel so might need the KTM offroad/bad fuel dongle - part no 60312953000.
    #12
  13. AdventureLeo

    AdventureLeo Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2011
    Oddometer:
    134
    Location:
    Worldwide
    I bought this one already. ;-)
    #13
  14. AdventureLeo

    AdventureLeo Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2011
    Oddometer:
    134
    Location:
    Worldwide
    The stock handguards made a good impression. Why to change?
    About the sidestand - I will check this once the machine is fully packed.
    #14
  15. pebble35

    pebble35 Long timer

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2007
    Oddometer:
    1,893
    Location:
    Jersey, Channel Islands
    The plastic handguards will swivel on the bars if you drop the bike, leaving the levers and the clutch.brake master cylinders open to damage. The handguards with the alloy backbone to them can be clamped up to the bars much tighter and will provide a lot more damage protection if you fall off.
    #15
  16. what car??

    what car?? down the road

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2010
    Oddometer:
    374
    Location:
    Colorado
    You might check out the ride report from Joe Pichler, he's on an 1190 in Africa.

    http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=841341

    Heck I'm sure you could probably email him and ask him first hand. That might be, IMHO, the best you could probably do for real world experience from such a fresh bike. Worth checking out. Good luck in your travels and keep us posted. :clap
    #16
  17. AdventureLeo

    AdventureLeo Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2011
    Oddometer:
    134
    Location:
    Worldwide
    Hey there!

    of course I know Joe Pichler. I am in contact with him. But it is always good to get more Information. ;-)

    Greetings
    #17
  18. kaptinkaos

    kaptinkaos Just some nOOb

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2008
    Oddometer:
    1,128
    Location:
    Airdrie, AB
    I don't think clamping the hand guards down is really a great idea myself. They are designed to swivel under really hard impacts and are more designed to keep things from hitting your hands while riding in bushes, flying rocks, wind, bugs etc. If they are mounted too tight they will not give way to the force and possibly destroy other things on your bars. Fwiw, I leave almost all my controls a little under spec torque so that when I do have an off I just need to straighten things out, not pick up the pieces. Just my 2 cents being a guy that has his share of offs, ;)

    The stock hand guards are just fine unless you plan on some SERIOUS off road stuff. The plastic has plenty of give, isn't too brittle and generally stands up fairly well to low speed dumps and spills. They also provide a bit better wind/weather protection than most aftermarket bark busters. To each his own though. I use alloy back boned bark busters on the majority of my bikes, but I ride like a fool in the dirt, hahaha!

    Joe

    *Edit: $40-60 will net you a second set of replacement levers. Cheaper than new hand guards and small/easy to pack. If you're worried about breaking levers, do like most off road guys do and drill a hole about 1/3rd the way down from the ball end. That way they break there instead of up close to the control. That allows you to still use it and get to somewhere you can replace it if need be. Cheers!
    #18
  19. kaptinkaos

    kaptinkaos Just some nOOb

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2008
    Oddometer:
    1,128
    Location:
    Airdrie, AB
    For a GPS I recommend a Garmin Zumo 550 if you can find one. Still more ergonomic than the newer Zumo's and a whole bunch more rugged. I've abused the crap out of one for 5 years. Mud, dust, ice, -30C riding, everything... It's still going strong and the touchscreen hasn't lost a pixel!

    http://www.gpscentral.ca/products/garmin/zumo.htm
    #19
  20. AdventureLeo

    AdventureLeo Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2011
    Oddometer:
    134
    Location:
    Worldwide
    Moin - I will stick to the original hand guards. Never had Problems with the ones on ma KTM 690. And with this bike I had some serious offroad experiences and of course falls. :wink:
    #20