Would this be crazy for a noobie?

Discussion in 'Americas' started by azrunner, Apr 26, 2013.

  1. High Country Herb

    High Country Herb Adventure Connoiseur

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    Yup, you're crazy. With your road bicycle experience, though, you can do it.

    Pick up[ the bike early in the day, and put 50 miles on it around town. If anything is not right, you can go right back to the dealer same day. If the first 50 goes well, head for home, varying speed around the lower side of traffic flow. Change your oil at the end of the second day, which will be earlier than recommended. Considering how many miles you're putting on it right out of the box, the small cost of an extra oil change will be worth it. By the time you get home, the bike will be pretty much broken in, ready for it's second oil change, after which you will be good to go for many happy miles.

    I personally think the interstate is the safest place to ride (and most boring) as long as you stay aware of blind spots and unexpected lane changes. The only issue would be having to travel so fast on the new bike. Given the Husky's top speed, however, I don't think 70 mph is asking too much.
    #21
  2. 100mpg

    100mpg Self Imposed Exile

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    why are you going all the way to Oregon? If you do not ride now, that is a ROUGH way to learn. You wont learn much about riding long distance by hoping on your friends bike a couple of times.
    #22
  3. 100mpg

    100mpg Self Imposed Exile

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    bingo. You will be surprised at how much harder 150 miles is on a small bike is then in a car.
    #23
  4. phoenixdoglover

    phoenixdoglover Where to next?

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    If you are an avid cyclist, and would think nothing of cycling 50 miles or more in a day, then I think this is entirely doable. I say this as a cyclist converted to motorcycling. Here is why:

    - you already have 2 wheel riding abilities; lot's of that still applies
    - you know how to put in long miles and stay focused and alive on the road
    - your butt can take abuse already
    - you know how to plan, dress for the conditions and pace yourself
    - you know how to eat to maintain your energy
    - you know about proper air pressure in the tires and a well oiled chain

    So what's to learn?

    - E=m v-squared ... the motorcycle is heavier and the energy involved is greater, so slowing and stopping needs to be prudent
    - the stupid thing can run out of fuel
    - your ego will be confused, as you will be able to pass other vehicles at high speed; best to have a little father-son talk with yourself
    - bugs hurt when they hit your face

    Enjoy!
    #24
  5. B.C.Biker

    B.C.Biker mighty fine

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    Doubt you'd be surprised but 150 paved miles on a motorcycle is sooo much easier than 150 miles on a bicycle. Bullshit your girlfriends not other bikers!:D
    #25
  6. rufusswan

    rufusswan Been here awhile

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    All true gents, and I admit his biking experience is a bit of a plus. It is also something that he will have to unlearn. There are NO motorbike lanes, and traffic does not seek to avoid motorcycles. He can't manhandle it as it is not a bike with a little motor attached, it is a different animal alltogether.

    He'd be best served by riding in the neighborhood of his hotel on the first day to hopefully become aware of the difference.

    Other than that he might be ok, at least on backroads he'd at least be going down the road at his selected pace as opposed to having city or highway set it for him.
    #26
  7. azrunner

    azrunner Adventurer

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    The voices of reason have spoken louder then the calls for adventure. I'll cool my jets for awhile, buy my friends Yamaha WR250R and get some miles under my belt before planning a multiday ride. Maybe Husqvarna will keep making the TR650 or some other bike will capture my interest in a few months. By then hopefully, I'll have developed some riding skills and gained more knowledge. My wife will be relieved, at least for a liitle while. I appreciate all the input. I'll defintely put it to use in the hopefully not so distant future.
    #27
  8. 100mpg

    100mpg Self Imposed Exile

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    smart move. You will see that while riding around town you will find things that IF they happened a few hundred miles away would REALLY suck bad. You will probably end up with different choice for a bike also.
    #28
  9. jimmex

    jimmex Guero con moto

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    Take every winding mountain pass route you can find. You'll be fine. Take your time and enjoy the ride. You never know what the future will bring. Saludos, JIm
    #29
  10. ddennis669

    ddennis669 Adventurer

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    That's us. The ReasonRider.com guys! We sit at home and read about Adventures. :cry

    I don't think I would go that far for a Husky, but I have ridden those roads and it's a great ride.
    #30
  11. 100mpg

    100mpg Self Imposed Exile

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    I dont understand why everyone on here thinks everyone should just run out and follow through with every single thought that pops into their head. this ain't stupidrider.com.
    Every one knows about the dangers even the most skilled riders face out on the highways on a bike, yet they want to send a first time rider out on a multi state tour? its fucking stupid.
    If you want to make many long trips, wait.
    If you want to try to see if you make it home, leave yesterday.
    #31
  12. the_sandman_454

    the_sandman_454 Been here awhile

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    I don't know. The guy isn't a stranger to two wheels or long days on an even worse saddle than the worst motorcycle I've ever ridden. He has faced all of the same dangers motorcyclists do, but did so while riding a pedal bike, which coincidentally, I consider more dangerous than a motorcycle since that vehicle can't generally keep up with the flow of traffic. He was going to put (hopefully) a bunch of miles around home on a 250 in the month prior to the trip.

    I think if any newbie would've been able to make it a successful trip this guy seems as likely a candidate as any I can think of. It probably is a good choice for him to hold off, but I still think his odds of survival wouldn't have been much, if any, worse than those of us with more miles under us.
    #32
  13. advNZer?

    advNZer? Long timer

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    i cant quite beleive this is adv rider....ride the world... not.What a bunch of wowsers.
    Do the build up on your friends bike.Make sure your gear is comfortable and you try some riding in less than ideal conditions.Make sure the first few days are panned quite conservativley,while you get used to the bike and break it in.Do not sit for long periods at the same speed.Be ready to stop often .But do it.Enjoy the whole trip.Take the back roads.
    #33
  14. ybracing

    ybracing Been here awhile

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    Just think, your adventure has just started.
    It starts with the decision to have an adventure.
    Good luck and ride safe.:clap
    #34
  15. WildAnCrazymtl

    WildAnCrazymtl Political Prisonor

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    You would be crazy not to do this!

    Bring a cell phone, a visa card and ride within your comfort zone.

    The stuff you over packed, mail home. The stuff you need, visa!

    You will figure out the rest for yourself!

    Have fun!

    Then tell us about it when you get back!

    And don't forget to have fun! :lol3
    #35
  16. eakins

    eakins Butler Maps

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    go for it. life is too short to wait or say another day.

    ride your friends bike every second you can and get those bike skills down fast.
    like others have said, pack real light as extra weight is hard for anyone.
    bring a small duffel with 1 pair of long wearing casual clothes and strap it down (rox straps) to the rear seat/rack.
    move it closer to center as possible. carry it on with you on the plane and wear your riding gear on the plane with you.
    #36
  17. Wdwrkr

    Wdwrkr Long timer

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    Do it. By the time you get home you'll be a much better rider then you were when you left. Just don't get cocky and you will be fine. We all took a first trip at one point, and we are all here to tell about it.
    #37
  18. manfromthestix

    manfromthestix Lost in Space

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    :cry I was afraid this would happen. I hadn't checked this thread for a few days and am sorry this was your decision, but I certainly understand it. It takes a lot to learn a whole new sport especially when we get older. My wife worries for me too when I do adventurous stuff, but she's generally very supportive.

    I like your idea of buying the WR250R; I have really enjoyed mine. It's a very dirt-oriented dual-sport, more so than the 650's I've owned because of the weight difference and suspension, and is a very capable little bike. It's been my experience that buying a used small DS bike won't cost you a lot in resale - after the initial depreciation they seem to hold their value quite well. When you're ready you can sell it for what you've got in it and go get the next bike. It won't be your last!

    Doug
    #38