WUMPA - my DMC Dauntless 1150GS Adventure rig

Discussion in 'Hacks' started by DRONE, Apr 26, 2011.

  1. DRONE

    DRONE Dog Chauffeur

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2007
    Oddometer:
    5,040
    Location:
    Chambers Bay, WA
    Your cases hinge to the side like this one?--

    [​IMG]

    To retrofit this to a top hinge would be pretty difficult. Seems like it might be easier (and cheaper!) to sell those cases and buy a set of top-loaders.

    The other option would be to post up a trade in the Flea Market--your Micatech's for somebody else's Zegas. It would be easy to put a front hinge on a Zega or a Pak-Meister.

    Also, there is an inmate in Portland, Stefan Dietz, who makes custom panniers. Since he's so close to you it might be worth the effort to see what he thinks about the project. Here's a link to his vendor thread.

    Anybody else know who makes a top-loader with a front hinge?
  2. triumphsidehack

    triumphsidehack Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2010
    Oddometer:
    181
    Location:
    Nowhere Indiana ,on the outskirts of Darmstadt
    Traxx ...from Twisted Throttle , in the process of mounting a set 38 's on the Rocket 3 this weekend ... pic's to follow soon.
  3. BeeMaa

    BeeMaa Hack Pilot

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2011
    Oddometer:
    1,098
    Location:
    NoVA
    How far east did you come to pick up Yuengling?
    Or was it "Rally Diet" time? :D

    Cheers.
  4. DRONE

    DRONE Dog Chauffeur

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2007
    Oddometer:
    5,040
    Location:
    Chambers Bay, WA
    Yes the Traxx cases have the right kind of hinge--

    [​IMG]


    But even if painted to match I think they'd look wrong on Ingrid. Too utilitarian--

    [​IMG]
  5. dholaday

    dholaday Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2008
    Oddometer:
    360
    Location:
    White Salmon, WA
    Drone:

    Thanks for the link to Stefan. Not sure what I will do - I have Metals Mules on my 2011 GS and like them a lot, but they get pricey because of the new exhaust. I like not having the cut-out on the left side bag. Claude makes side cases too.

    I think there is a way to lower the stock exhaust on the GS. That may give me more options.

    The TRAX look like they mount really high. Wunderlich sells a Hepco-Becker set with front[?] hinges and a exhaust lowering kit.

    Whatever, I'm going to have to keep the paint scheme similar to what's on the Micatechs now. :-)
  6. DRONE

    DRONE Dog Chauffeur

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2007
    Oddometer:
    5,040
    Location:
    Chambers Bay, WA
    In addition to the kit they sell for the 1150GS, Happy-Trail also sells a $90 exhaust lowering piece for the '05-'09 1200GS -- link.
  7. dholaday

    dholaday Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2008
    Oddometer:
    360
    Location:
    White Salmon, WA
    Drone:
    Thanks. Wunderlich also sells one [Hepco-Becker, I think].
    Did you lower the exhaust on your rig?

    I'm going to research this further when I get home. Need to look not ony at lowering kits but also how they make up with pannier brackets and panniers. Not sure how much mix-and-match I can do and still have things work right.
  8. DRONE

    DRONE Dog Chauffeur

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2007
    Oddometer:
    5,040
    Location:
    Chambers Bay, WA
    Here's a pic of my lowered pipe and Happy-Trail panniers from page 1--

    [​IMG]


    And another--

    [​IMG]


    These are mounted on a old-style Happy-Trail SU rack.

    But, you know what? You might just leave the Micatech's on there, and do what I do--put the stuff you don't hardly ever need in the right pannier, then figure out some sort of quick-release so you can pull off the whole pannier at the end of the day then re-mount it the next morning.
  9. Abenteuerfahrer

    Abenteuerfahrer Deaf on Wheels

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2007
    Oddometer:
    2,362
    Location:
    Prescott, Arizona, USA
    Drone and Duncan...

    The Micatech have the easiest quick release or mount brackets. These brackets are so aesthetically designed and look so good when the cases are totally removed from the bike: no hanging obscured brackets! Flows with the bike!

    [​IMG]


    However, they do have a cross bar that stretches from one case to another..this must be removed before sliding them off which can be a pain if the cases are full with heavy stuff as it presses against the cross brace cone.

    Then from inside where there are three finger lock screws with their own lock taps. Two for the cases and 1 for the cross bar... Loosen them, remove the cross bar and slide the cases off! Use case(s) as seat; table; observation post if you double up :lol3!

    [​IMG]

    cheers...
  10. DRONE

    DRONE Dog Chauffeur

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2007
    Oddometer:
    5,040
    Location:
    Chambers Bay, WA
    Those Micatechs really are pretty awesome! :D
  11. DRONE

    DRONE Dog Chauffeur

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2007
    Oddometer:
    5,040
    Location:
    Chambers Bay, WA
    OK, back to WUMPA-related blather.

    I mentioned back in Post #200 on page 14 that I was going to get the subframe stripped and powdercoated since it was off the bike anyway while the clutch work was getting done. I'm glad I did this, not only for appearance but also for technical reasons. Here's what I found out.

    My subframe was originally installed by the P.O.--not by DMC. I had never inspected the install job before. There are two big-assed bolts that are vital to fastening the subframe to the motor. On the stock 1150, these are M12's and they are 30mm long. They attach the sidestand to the motor. Here are pics of the bolts I'm talking about--

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Well, here's the thing. Once you add the subframe, these bolts are too short--there's only about 15mm of threads that are actually engaged. This is not enough! The P.O. should have done the install with longer bolts but he didn't--he reused the OEM bolts. When I removed them, the bolts (hardened steel) were fine but the alloy threads inside the motor were not. They were badly stressed. I'm not sure if you can tell from this pic, but these threads were not good--

    [​IMG]


    My suggestion to all is to remove these bolts and inspect them. You can do one at a time with the sidecar in place--you don't have to remove anything else. First thing I did was to run a tap in there to clean up the threads. Then I replaced the bolts with 45mm. This will double the length of threads inside the motor that are holding the car to the bike!
  12. DRONE

    DRONE Dog Chauffeur

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2007
    Oddometer:
    5,040
    Location:
    Chambers Bay, WA
    By the way, take another look at the 1st two pics in the previous post. That subframe looks nice! When I took it to the powdercoater it was all beat up, and the leading edges were worn to bare metal by road wear. Here's a "before" pic of the front part of the subframe--

    [​IMG]

    The powdercoater chemically stripped the two pieces down to bare metal, sandblasted them, applied a primer base, then the gray topcoat. All for $75!
  13. DRONE

    DRONE Dog Chauffeur

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2007
    Oddometer:
    5,040
    Location:
    Chambers Bay, WA
    Also, while the clutch was being worked on, I removed the Y-pipe and sent it out for ceramic coating. I didn't really take any "before" pics, but here are two pics where you can see parts of the Y-pipe and basically the entire y-pipe looked like this, all rusty and crappy--

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    And, for only $65 at Performance Coatings in Auburn, here's what it looks like now!

    [​IMG]


    Ooooh! Now every time I get down there to change my oil, I'll get a little smile on my face.
  14. DRONE

    DRONE Dog Chauffeur

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2007
    Oddometer:
    5,040
    Location:
    Chambers Bay, WA
    Also sent my front Ohlins out for re-build and to get re-sprung.

    [​IMG]


    Now it's sporting a 15/62 spring replacing the old 13/58. Cost $200 for the rebuild and another $100 for the spring. The red color was added by myself using a Krylon rattle can product called "Fusion for plastic". It works pretty good--I had used it to paint my old spring too and it held up OK.
  15. DRONE

    DRONE Dog Chauffeur

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2007
    Oddometer:
    5,040
    Location:
    Chambers Bay, WA
    About the clutch. I got the bike back from South sound BMW on Friday. Upon disassembly, my diagnosis of a blown slave cylinder was indeed correct. I got it replaced, and got the Lucas sintered clutch installed, and racked up 8 hours of labor. On top of the labor charges, here's what the parts cost--

    $288--sintered clutch (shipped from Wunderlich)
    $162--slave
    $192--clutch housing
    $ 92--pressure plate
    $ 72--diaphragm spring
    $ 59--gaskets, fluids and misc parts

    Of course, I was curious to see how badly worn the old clutch was. The OEM organic friction plate is 6.6mm thick. The Service Manual says it should be replaced when it gets to 4.8mm. Mine measured out at 5.2mm. That means I had about 22% of my organic pads left after 47,000 miles as a solo bike and 17,000 miles as a hack. Good call I think to do the upgrade now instead of later.

    I had to ride the bike back to my house as a solo bike (the sidecar is sitting in my garage with the subframe etc.) I was expecting all kinds of drama riding the bike for the first time with the sintered clutch. Everybody told me to keep the revs up when shifting and to allow the friction plate to engage very gradually to avoid chudder or grabbiness. Several people said "Be careful!" like I was taking my life in my hands.

    Well, guess what? Total yawner. The clutch was smooth as silk. I only live about 10 miles away so there were only 8 places where I had to upshift or downshift, but there was no drama at all. Yes, it felt different, but really it was quite smooth. After I get the car re-attached, I'll take it out for a more grueling break-in and will report back here.
  16. davebig

    davebig Another Angry Hun !

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2004
    Oddometer:
    6,111
    Location:
    Minnesota
    Drone had you ever bottomed the 13/58 do you have any sag ? I must be under sprung or my trail shortening mod works differently I have an 11/54 and have not bottomed it in 1500 miles of learning, I just ordered a 12/56 as I'm planning on going to one of Strokers front wheels ASAP. I shortened the telelever and extended the lower ball joint mount 3/4"leaving the fork angle and wheelbase stock.HAve had 220 pound buddy in chair ripped around allot and never bottomed.
    You won me over on your clutch argument though !
  17. DRONE

    DRONE Dog Chauffeur

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2007
    Oddometer:
    5,040
    Location:
    Chambers Bay, WA
    Unfortunately, yes, I have bottomed the front shock. This was last year fully loaded on a week-long camping trip with 50-lb Kirby in the car. I was in 1st gear on a very rough road south of Sisters, Oregon. There are other times I've gotten close, and there are routes I've avoided simply because of my lack of confidence in that spring.

    I haven't measured the sag, but this doesn't seem to be of much import to me since the load on the bike varies so much from "no monkee, no gear" to "big monkee, lotsa gear". With the old 13/58, I did get more brake dive than I wanted. Will report back after I do some miles with the new one.
  18. DRONE

    DRONE Dog Chauffeur

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2007
    Oddometer:
    5,040
    Location:
    Chambers Bay, WA
    Got out this weekend and gave the shock a 500-mile workout with a one-night camping load and 50-lb Kirby in the car. Got onto one badly rutted trail where I was basically stuck in 1st and 2nd gear for almost an hour. Did not bottom!! Came close at least two times. This road was nasty enough that I was averaging 7-9 mph on the downhill sections and 10-12 mph on the return back up from the river.

    Here's a pic of this road before it started to get angry--

    [​IMG]


    I am HAPPY! :wings

    However, I did bottom the rear shock ONCE but I'm not so worried about that because my motor and cylinder heads are not in the back of the bike. But, this winter might be a good time to bump up the spring rate on the rear shock too.
  19. DRONE

    DRONE Dog Chauffeur

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2007
    Oddometer:
    5,040
    Location:
    Chambers Bay, WA
    Started to break in the new Lucas sintered clutch this weekend. Did about 500 miles and that included maybe about 50 miles of gravel and dirt where I never got out of 3rd gear.

    OK, first let's talk about chudder. Yes, chudder definitely happens--at least during the break-in period. But only on start-ups in 1st gear. No chudder on any upshifts. Upshifts were all perfectly smooth and fine.

    On the 1st gear chudder--the common advice is more revs and feather it in real slow until the clutch plates are fully engaged. That didn't really work as well as I'd've liked. I found that the best way to get going without chudder was to spin up the motor and feather the clutch just enough to get rolling then to drop the revs and dump it--then get back on the throttle and continue about my business.

    I also found that the chudder came and went and I couldn't tell why I'd get chudder on some starts and not on others. Just another motorcycle mystery.

    Other than that, the clutch felt great and I was on some roads that were about as challenging as I ever try to ride on. In fact, I think my skills must be improving a little because that one road that I took down to the river I probably would not have attempted last summer, but it didn't even make me pucker up yesterday. I might even go so far as to say it was "fun"!
  20. davebig

    davebig Another Angry Hun !

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2004
    Oddometer:
    6,111
    Location:
    Minnesota
    I tried my new spring a 12/58 and it hasn't bottomed and its not allowing as much sag,I'm sort of planning at least one more step possibly two after I get one of Strokers front wheels.I tore thru a tourance that was more than half gone when the sidecar was attached,stuck a used lazer on that had been residing in my garage.I think it has to do with the braking eating up the tires.
    I have not got around to removing my ABSi and may not until the pump dies, I have the parts but will have plenty of time this winter. Your clutch saga has made me aware of how hard on the clutch the additional weight is and how sloppy my technique is if the engines cold.
    The Mississippi River Valley has plenty of lovely sights but those Conifer forest's in the NW are really special, I envy your locale and Claude's shop in PA has lots of gorgeous old forests all around.I need to get out more. DB