WUMPA - my DMC Dauntless 1150GS Adventure rig

Discussion in 'Hacks' started by DRONE, Apr 26, 2011.

  1. DRONE

    DRONE Dog Chauffeur

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    Be cool to have two batteries. :evil Need some kind of isolator between them so you always got one battery full.

    In my pic there, the big wire wrapped around in front is actually an 18-inch pigtail that attaches to my heated seat. I also have a 12-inch pigtail for my heated jacket somewhere in that mess. Take away those two things and it would look a bit tidier.

    ******************

    Sometimes I think you and me are the only ones subscribed to this thread, but the view count keeps going up so I guess somebody else must find this chatter entertaining. Over 40,000 views now. :eek1
  2. davebig

    davebig Another Angry Hun !

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    This popped right up, I'm going to discuss it with mentor tomorrow.DB
    http://www.overland.co.za/Dual_Battery/dual_batt_diode.jpg
    Heated seat !!!!!!!!!!!!! I was raised Roman Catholic too much comfort is bad !!!!!!!!!!! LOL
    40,000 wiews
    Wumpa is not my idea of Valhalla but its very nicely turned out rig the tail light on the trunk is very nice, all and all its the best looking one on ADV.DB
  3. dholaday

    dholaday Been here awhile

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  4. davebig

    davebig Another Angry Hun !

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    My stuff is not done so there's not much to see my thread http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=826829&page=4
    I'm considering running the motorcycle battery also just to have terminals up there to make neater connections , my welder electrical tech guru says 2 battery systems don't need isolators unless there is multiple big loads(RV frigs, huge sound systems etc) as Ned is doing it's better to have a plan and make a diagram, then decide how to proceed. I just wanted a huge battery and on the frame rail it doesn't use up trunk space, and its ballast besides.DB
  5. XL-erate

    XL-erate Been here awhile

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    Haven't recently read whole thread so maybe missed something and don't know what your experience there is, but on the dual battery thing: for RV's and some truck setups we use a Battery Isolator. These split the charging so that the main vehicle battery is always fully recharged first, then when it's fully charged the charge output from alternator automatically switches to the auxiliary battery until it's fully charged as well.

    This way your primary battery for starting is always ready to work and the charging of auxiliary doesn't rob charging from main. Without these Isolators, in an RV, you can accidently discharge auxiliary, then maybe have some hard starting for the main and next you know everything is dead. So it's good backup protection. Isolators are a little pricey but if you shop around a dual system isn't that bad.

    Anyways, nice build!
  6. DRONE

    DRONE Dog Chauffeur

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    That's kinda what we were talking about above. When I Google it, I seem to come up with all sorts of things but nothing that seems to fit the bill.

    As an experienced user of a battery isolator, would you have a link to a product that you think would work well on a sidecar rig? I'm thinking something smaller and more compact than maybe what you might choose for an RV.
  7. davebig

    davebig Another Angry Hun !

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    As an experienced user of a battery isolator, would you have a link to a product that you think would work well on a sidecar rig? I'm thinking something smaller and more compact than maybe what you might choose for an RV.[/QUOTE]

    I was talking to welder electrical tech this AM he says isolators are unnecessary for our application as we don't have enough load,RV frigs, inverters running amps so you can practice playing you telecaster for Kirby or a microwave, all that stuff eats power.An LED reading light for your tent or radio isn't going to take much. But if one has to have one the switches are better than the diode setup I found earlier as there is usually a .4-.6 V drop across the diode and motorcycles never really have more than enough.Meaning if ones got allot of stuff running and the regulators holding 13.6 one doesn't want to loose any of that.DB
  8. davebig

    davebig Another Angry Hun !

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    I struggle with minor decisions, but am great at major ones.Minor one I ordered a Westco battery for my rig and will make it into a dual battery setup only because it will give two good terminals I can add copper buss bars too and just make the area neater,I'll add an Eastern Beaver 3 circuit solution and I have my blue sea fusebox in the trunk.I don't plan on a battery isolator, I have no need.
    So what electrical devices do you guys take out and about camping or traveling ???? Inquiring minds want to know.DB
  9. davebig

    davebig Another Angry Hun !

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    I started with this I got from one of Drones Firecrest neighbors, I don't think he knew allot more about it than I did, I asked had it been professionally installed he said yes.Parade rig only went straight of course it had 20" of wheel lead .
    [​IMG]
    I tried just adding a Steerite it was only marginally better, I talked to Brock and paid another sidecar guy in IA to remount it, It was better it only had about 11-12 " of lead and was doable but he liked allot of lean out and I kept falling off the saddle.Welder buddy and I didn't have enough to do for a bit Brock and Claude gave me some advice and walla we cut the mounts off reattached and it was down to 9 " lead and was a very usable sidecar, big battery in the trunk 18" wheel on chair and front, bumpers PIAA's, better upholstery, headlight in a relay circuit and power plugs and aux fuse block in faux tank via E Beaver, drilled brake rotors and steel lines it stopped as good as my BMW's.If it would have been easy to add ground clearance I would still have it those old wings hang on like grim death.DB
    [​IMG]
    Just not enough ground clearance for wet spring roads we had just dragged the sump through a wet frost pocket hole.
    [​IMG]
  10. OPNYD

    OPNYD Bald, old, crabby, & fast

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    For what it's worth: check marine suppliers (like West Marine). In my former life I piloted offshore speedboats which all contained 2-battery system switches/isolaters. Guest was one brand name device. Smallish - would easily be adaptable to motorbike & sidecar use.
  11. BeeMaa

    BeeMaa Hack Pilot

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  12. DRONE

    DRONE Dog Chauffeur

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    Your link is to an "old technology" diode-type battery isolator. Looks something like this--

    [​IMG]


    Diode isolators work, and they get used a lot in boats and RV's etc., but they need all those cooling fins because diode-type isolators get hot. Heat=bad, IMO. Also, diode-type isolators consume a certain amount of juice so that your bike is gonna run at less than full voltage and the two batteries never really reach full charge.

    A more "new technology" isolator is a voltage sensing relay sometimes called an ACR (Automatic Charging Relay). Consumes only milli-amps of power and produces no heat. Something like this--

    [​IMG]


    Here's a cool diagram from the Blue Sea website showing the difference in how they get wired up--

    [​IMG]


    Seems like the ACR would work a lot better on a bike. BTW, that ACR shown above only costs $85 - link.

    If you want to do something like this, you need to make sure that the power for the aux circuits that you plan to use when the bike is not running comes from the 2nd battery, not from your main battery. If you have an aux fuse panel that is triggered by a switched circuit (fuse panel turns on only when the bike is running), then the aux circuits that you want to run when the bike is turned off are going to have to be connected directly to the 2nd battery, or install a 2nd fuse panel powered by the 2nd battery with a trigger switch that also goes directly to the 2nd battery.

    There's a lot of good basic info about isolators at the Yandina website. Yandina is a West Marine spin-off located in South Carolina.
  13. XL-erate

    XL-erate Been here awhile

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    Sorry, I didn't get back to see the requests for more info! In addition to the excellent information already posted:

    I use Sure Power isolators, good quality and fairly reasonable prices. They come in all sizes according to needs i.e. load etc. Prices from like $25 on up for the 'older style' isolators:

    http://www.ase-supply.com/Battery_Isolator_Sure_Power_s/153.htm

    A lot of peace of mind if you're out boondocking.
  14. davebig

    davebig Another Angry Hun !

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    When I quoted Drone once I trimmed it poorly, I thought he was interested in a battery isolator, I intend to try a 2 battery system w/o isolator as I have no huge loads to isolate the batteries from each other for. I'm adding a battery in my stock position mostly to have terminals to connect the power leads and not hack-up my BMW harness just a neat spot to make connections. If I have issues I'll consider an isolator.
    Ned if you want to add a battery to your trunk (ballast) I'll have lots of leftover 4 awg welding cable in black and red, if you like. I bought 50' as the cost was good and we will eventually use it at friends welding, welder repair shop.
    I'll repeat my question,what 12v devices do you take camping ? Did you recognize my Honda/ Ural from Firecrest ? DB
  15. DRONE

    DRONE Dog Chauffeur

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    I don't recognize the Fircrest rig, sorry.

    Right now, I power NOTHING from the rig at my campsite. I'm afraid of waking up to a dead battery! But . . . if I had two batteries with an isolator I would consider (1) leaving my somewhat huge CPAP battery at home, (2) wearing my Gerbings jacket inside my sleeping bag instead of being cold all night (not old age--I've always slept cold, even when I was a teenager), and (3) moving the heated seat cushion for Kirby from the bike to the tent so that he's not shivering all night.

    Then, of course, there's always the RoadPro 12-volt Pizza Oven. You carry one of those don't you?

    [​IMG]
  16. davebig

    davebig Another Angry Hun !

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    Drone
    If you use a CPAC for sleep do they make a 12v model ? Add a battery to the trunk, I have some good welding cable for you, you get an isolator and away you go if your not going to use it to start the bike the cable sizes can be smaller.
    Can you give up any trunk room ? A odyssey back there on the right side is ballast, power and luxury.DB
  17. davebig

    davebig Another Angry Hun !

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    http://www.starmarinedepot.com/Blue...+ON|OFF.html?gclid=CNu36O-WtLUCFap_QgodOwgAZw

    In the spirit of kiss (keep it simple stupid) this in the trunk on your ballast battery box allows manual disconnect you'll have to turn it back on when you go ridding to recharge the second battery but it can't be any simpler or more reliable.But I operate under the delusion that simple & reliable where what people who owned BMW's originally sought.DB
  18. DRONE

    DRONE Dog Chauffeur

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    What, this thing here??--

    [​IMG]

    It only has two positions! That dial is big enough to support at least 8 different choices. Whoever designed that thing is clearly lacking imagination. :D

    But seriously, those voltage sensing relays and diode isolators all require lots of wiring and connections. Kinda cool, but why not a simple switch for a simple solution? I like it!
  19. FR700

    FR700 Banned

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    Color me confused , but how does putting on a longer shock alter axle height ?



    ... this bit I get ... if your previous tire had a larger diameter.



    .
  20. DRONE

    DRONE Dog Chauffeur

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    Here's the next big thing -- I've upgraded my rear shock. It's an Ohlins BM 215-1.

    Last September I upgraded my front shock--just a straight rebuild of the Ohlins BM 216-2 but with a new size 15 spring (354 lb) replacing the size 13 (331 lb) I had. Cost $300. I also increased my rebound damper to 10 clicks back from all the way. Went on two backcountry camping trips after that and was really happy with the result. My front end sag was reduced, and my travel was increased, no more bottoming the front shock in holes, wallowing almost completely eliminated, and the handling was just generally nicer. I posted a pic of it back on page 16 but here it is again--

    [​IMG]


    Encouraged by the front shock improvement, I decided to bite the bullet and do the rear shock too. This one cost $500--basic rebuild service was $210, plus another $40 because the remote preload adjuster was totally blown, plus $100 for the new spring, PLUS--another $130 to add a Ride Height Adjuster! (for you math wizards--the rest is sales tax.) My new spring is a 1095-84-200 (1142 lb) replacing a 1095-64-160 (914 lb) so that's about a 25% increase in spring rate. Yes, I know - huge!

    Lots of angst went into this. Here's some of the threads that helped with the decision--Because it seems like several guys with 1150GS hacks have blown out the seals on the pre-load adjuster (including me) I'm convinced that the adjuster is not really robust enough to deal with the strain of a sidecar rig. I'm gonna run mine with the pre-load adjuster backed off all the way to "zero". Then, using the collar on the shock body, I put just a little bit of pre-load tension on the spring. The idea here is to give me as much travel as possible, and the softest ride as possible, given the stiffness of the spring. Like the front shock, I plan to start out with the rebound damping at 10 clicks from full.

    Here's a pic of the OEM shock, my new Ohlins shock, and the old spring--

    [​IMG]


    Now, about that Ride Height Adjuster. This is an option available straight from Ohlins. In the pic above, I have the adjuster all the way tight--in other words, the shock is as short as it will go. Even so, my shock is now 416mm eye-to-eye. Too long! The OEM shock is 390mm. My swingarm only has 404mm of total travel. After I took this pic, I brought the shock back to the shop and asked them to shorten it to 400mm with the RHA turned out about 10mm. This they did (no charge) by changing around the internal stops on the shock.

    OK, so now my shock is 10mm longer than the stock shock which translates to about a 20mm change in ride height measured at the axle. I'm not sure how much my ride height and ground clearance have changed in total with the longer shock and the stiffer spring, but clearly it'll be more than it was. The only measurement I've made so far is the static sag (which means, as I'm using it here, the distance the suspension sags under the bike's weight alone, without a rider, from its fully extended position, as measured from the rear axle to the frame). With my old spring it was 2-1/2 inches (65mm). Now it's about 5/8" (16mm). That seems like a pretty decent improvement!

    Not everything is going upwards, though, I'm also going to try a 175/65-15 tire which will lower my axle height about 10mm from the 155/80-15 Snow+ tire I used the last two seasons (link to tire calculator).

    One thing that seems like almost too much of a coincidence is the ground clearance on the bike now as it sits in the garage. The lowest point on the bike is the subframe and right now (with no rider) the very front of the subframe and the very rear of the subframe are both exactly 9 inches from the garage floor. In other words, the bike looks totally level. How'd that happen? Dumb luck I guess. I'll have to load it up and get on board then have Queen Bee get down on the floor and re-measure to see what it looks like fully loaded.

    How does it ride? Don't know yet. Still got a few more things on my winter punch list to do before I take it out on the road. I will post up more pics and my impressions later on this Spring.

    Next up? I've got to get that new FD installed, and I'm adding a custom-made alu cage for an aux gas can.