WV Historical Markers - Let's Find All 700

Discussion in 'Southeast, The Lair of the Dragon - The Blue Ridge' started by pnoman, Nov 16, 2008.

  1. MAN OF BLUES

    MAN OF BLUES COG #5977 EX-TECH EDITOR

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    many of the immigrants were of this very descent, as I noted in my above post, as it was not clear which part of that land they came from. the Mc klans being a major player in this elusive descendant tree...:rofl :photog
    #61
  2. vatrader01

    vatrader01 vatrader01

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    I found a few markers in Charles Town, WV. There may be more, I just found these while downtown. This one is in front of the old Post Office.

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    Up a few blocks, and to the left, I spotted this marker.

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    Getting the bike in some of these photos is tough, 'specially in downtown areas. Need a vest with "TOUROID" on the back to explain to the natives why I am trespassing.

    A better shot of side one:

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    And the other side:

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    The Stone House:

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    Plaque reads:

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    Interesting bit of history I was not aware of. Looking into the database for historical markers in this state, I could run off a set of tires chasing down markers in this county alone. My life now has purpose. George Washington and / or his clan members slept in every outhouse, doghouse and cat house in this county, and each and every one has a marker.
    #62
  3. pnoman

    pnoman Just Average

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    vatrader01,

    Thanks for both posts. Yes, some of the signs may seem mundane (Harrison county alone has at least 6 or 8 identical signs as you enter the county from different routes), but added together they give a glimpse into our history. Keep 'em coming. I'll update the Markers List tonight and add these.

    I like your "Touroid" vest idea:rofl . I get some funny looks, too, when I'm taking photos.


    Man of Blues,

    These could be your relatives. Heck, everyone in WV and VA is related somehow or another, or so it seems.
    #63
  4. pnoman

    pnoman Just Average

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    Located on the southeast edge of Clarksburg along Rt 20, Nutter Fort has a population (in 2000) of about 1,700. It's a quiet town probably best known locally for its large city park.

    From Wikipedia:

    Arriving in the early 1770s, the families of brothers Thomas, Matthew, and Christopher Nutter were early European settlers to western Virginia. Thomas Nutter had received a land grant for 1,400 acres (5.7 km²) of land along Elk Creek in what was then Monongalia County. Together with the settlers Obadiah and Daniel Davisson, the Nutters constructed a fort in 1772, later known as Nutter's Fort, said to have been one of the strongest forts south of Fort Pitt. Located on the eastern side of Elk Creek, the fort was used by the Virginia state militia from 1776-1780 in conflicts with Native Americans. Thomas Nutter served as a Captain in the Revolutionary Army and died in early August 1808. When the community was incorporated in 1923, it took its name to honor both Nutter and the original settlement. (End Quote)


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    Historical Marker - located across from the City Park along Rt 20. I wonder if Hacker's Creek is now Hacker Valley? If so, then why isn't Rella's Restaurant here??



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    View down Rt 20.



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    Unfortunately, as I was taking these photos, Santa (who was crossing the busy road without looking both ways) was struck by a speeding Fire Truck on its way to a fire. I caught the moment of impact in the photo above. :eek1 :eek1 :eek1 JUST KIDDING!! Santa is safe and sound, and if you've been a good boy or girl, he will be stopping by your house to bring you a new V-Strom this year. :clap
    #64
  5. DeBandi

    DeBandi Exploring Alabama

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    You guys are doing a great job.

    Keep up the good work.

    Great thread with a great subject.:freaky
    #65
  6. pnoman

    pnoman Just Average

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    Thank you. Coming from an obvious history buff and great writer (re: Your outstanding report on Cape Coalwood :bow ) that is quite a compliment. While I am by no means an expert on history, that doesn't stop me from being interested in the past of my home state. Hopefully this project will enlighten all of us to stop more often and look under our own noses at the interesting world that surrounds us!

    I'm surprised other states aren't doing this. I think most states have similar plaques/markers. It seems to be catching on here, even though the weather has not cooperated.
    #66
  7. vatrader01

    vatrader01 vatrader01

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    I went marker huntin' this week. Almost got my limit! Here's the first one I bagged on this trip: Located East / northeast of Summit Point, WV on RT 611, located in a set of "S" curves and in a little valley.

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    West Virginia's oldest standing barn.


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    The White House at White House Farm:

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    The restored spring house:


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    I found this web site that details the history and restoration of this property: http://www.whitehousefarmwv.org/whitehousefarm.html

    From Wikipedia:
    In May 1740, Dr. John McCormick, a Scots-Irish immigrant, purchased 395 acres (1.60 km<SUP>2</SUP>) from Jost Hite, a German land developer who had obtained 30,000 acres (120 km²) from John and Isaac Van Metre. By 1742, Dr. McCormick had built a three-story stone farmhouse. He was a prosperous and prominent country doctor, as evidenced by the inventory of his estate completed upon his death in 1768. He and his wife Ann had six sons (James, Francis, John Jr., William, George, and Andrew) and two daughters (Mary, wife of Magnus Tate, and Jean, wife of James Byrn). George Washington completed a survey of McCormick&#8217;s land in 1752 and James McCormick served as the chain carrier and John Jr. as the pilot on several of George Washington's early surveys. White House Farm was noted for the horses bred there during Dr. McCormick's lifetime.
    Upon Dr. McCormick's death in 1768, the farm was bequeathed to his youngest son, Andrew. During the Revolutionary war, Andrew and his wife Nancy provided food, lodging, and horses to Washington's troops. After the war, Andrew apparently operated an inn on the farm, for he paid for an "ordinary&#8221; license on February 18th, 1794. For such an endeavor, the site benefited from its location on the most direct route between Frederick, Maryland and Winchester, VA.
    On September 9, 1807, Andrew sold the farm to John Locke and John&#8217;s brother George managed the ordinary, which had become known as White House Tavern. By 1845, Eleanor Locke, John&#8217;s daughter, was living in the house with her husband, Joseph Morrow, a farmer who also operated a blacksmith shop across the road near the springhouse during the Civil War. During the War of Northern Aggression, Major Harry Gilmor, Confederate States Army and his men were attacked by a group of Union soldiers led by Captain George Somers as the Confederates were resting in front of the house. Major Gilmor shot and killed Captain Somers as his men took cover behind the barn. The house was renovated in the late 1800&#8217;s by the Morrows and subsequent owners added a few rooms.
    Between 1929 and 1940 the farm was owned by Luther and Lelia Naylor, who converted the stone stable into a milking barn and constructed a silo. This dairy operation continued until about 1950 when Col. and Mrs. Edward Blake purchased the property, which was passed on to John and Alice Blake Van Tol in 1974.
    #67
  8. vatrader01

    vatrader01 vatrader01

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    Once I bagged and tagged the White House Farm marker, my gloves had not warmed up yet when I came upon this marker on the same road [ Rt 611, east / northeast of Summit Point, WV]. The marker is right in front of Jefferson Elementary School. Look for this on the north side of the road:

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    The Marker with the obligatory-bike-in-the-photo:

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    Marker:

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    Although most of the land George Washington owned was west of the mountains, it was today's Eastern Panhandle that captured his heart. Two years after George Washington began his surveying career at 16 years old, he used his salary as a surveyor to purchase five hundred and fifty acres along Bullskin Run in Jefferson County. Today, part of the Rock Hall Tract is now the location of the elegant Hillbrook Inn.

    It was 1750 and the beginning of George's lifelong investment in the land that would become West Virginia. Ultimately, he and Lawrence acquired tens of thousands of acres in Jefferson County.

    The area elected him to his first political office in the Virginia House of Burgesses.
    #68
  9. vatrader01

    vatrader01 vatrader01

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    Located west of Charles Town, WV on Rt 51, north side of the road. Directly north of this sign 100-150 yards lies the ruins of the church. Apparently private property, based on the cable across the drive and the "No Trespassing" signs. It's West Virginia, I can claim illiteracy. Really. I didn't trespass. Just have one hell of a telephoto lens on this cheap camera.:D

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    It is obvious that restoration was begun sometime in the last 20 years, based on the condition of the mortar joints. I can find no info on a restoration project.

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    The "bike-in-the-photo" photo. The picture is not out of focus. Drizzle on the lens.

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    I did not find much more info on this site other than what stated on the marker.

    EDIT: Look a little and learn a lot. I wondered why this Church fell into such a pile of ruble. Like Paul Harvey, this is some of the rest of the story. It is told that a pair of young men of the neighborhood duelled here on the grounds of the church, one duelist mortally wounded. He was carried into the church where he died. He was buried here on the church grounds. No information on the damsel the dual was about. Frequent reports of a figure dressed in white was seen on starlit nights, walking from the church to the grave of the young man shot during the dual. The folks where a little leery of ghosts back in the day. Later, during the War of Northern Aggression, the lead roof of the church was removed and used for ammunition. This allowed water to run into the walls, freeze and thaw and generally wreck the masonry structure. Added to that, rumor had it that treasures had been stashed in the church. Bear in mind that nothing was safe or sacred during the war. Some who gave credence to the rumors tore up the floors and destroyed anything in sight seeking the treasures. The church fell victim to two of the seven deadly sins: Fear and Greed.
    #69
  10. vatrader01

    vatrader01 vatrader01

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    This marker is located on Country Club Road, Charles Town, .05 miles north of RT 340, on the right. The mansion itself is about 1 mile north and on the right. There is an entrance feature marked "Beallair". Follow the signs to historic Beallair. The entire area surrrounding this house has become McMansions.

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    The original portion of Beallair was built by Thomas Beall of Georgetown in the late 1700&#8217;s. Thomas Beall willed the property to his daughter Eliza and her husband, George Corbin Washington, one of George Washington&#8217;s grand-nephews. Their son, Lewis Washington, moved to the Beallair property in 1840 and added the tall, formal front portion of the house a few years later. Lewis played prominently in the events of the John Brown raid in 1859. On the night of Sunday, October 16th, John Brown sent a group of armed men to Beallair to kidnap Lewis. Taken hostage, he was transported in his own carriage to the firehouse at Harpers Ferry, where John Brown and his men laid siege, and where they were arrested two days later. Of particular interest to Brown were Lewis Washington&#8217;s heirlooms, which included a sword that had been given to George Washington by Frederick the Great. This sword was taken when Lewis was captured and given to John Brown, who wore it for the duration of the siege. Lewis Washington was remembered for his coolness and nonchalance as he left the firehouse. Governor Wise conferred the title of Colonel on Lewis Washington for his exemplary conduct during this incident.

    Undated photo
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    This the first of seven houses associated with the Washington family.
    #70
  11. pnoman

    pnoman Just Average

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    Located about halfway between Clarksburg and Shinnston on Rt 19, Spelter is the location of an old zinc mine that DuPont ran for several years. DuPont sold it in 1950, but repurchased it later to do cleanup. It has had to pay out millions in lawsuits and cleanup costs. Rt 19 is a good ride, but like I said on the earlier post, it does have occasional slow traffic and big trucks. Avoid the traffic, and it's a very enjoyable ride.


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    Historic Marker on Rt 19 at Spelter turnoff. South-facing inscription.


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    Same sign at Rt 19 Spelter turnoff - North Facing side of sign.



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    View of Marker and train bridge.



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    All that's left of the original zinc mine is this old house.



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    Beautiful downtown Spelter. It even has a nice Methodist Church (to the left of my bike). I wonder if this town used to be like Coalwood before the zinc mine closed? It seemed nice and quiet when I stopped there.
    #71
  12. PABiker

    PABiker Anywhere but here

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    Yep, been past that place a time or two (actually more like around 50 times going to the power plant).

    Thanks.
    #72
  13. vatrader01

    vatrader01 vatrader01

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    Located west of Charles Town, WV 3.3 miles along RT 51 on the south side of the road.

    Very poor photo of bike with marker.
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    Harewood photo from the 1930's

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    A trespasser's recent photo


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    The house was designed by John Ariss for Samuel Washington in 1770. Washington moved from his farm on Chotank creek in Stafford County,Virginia to Harewood, accumulating 3800 acres by the time he died in 1781.

    Harewood was prominent in the Battle of Summit Point in 1864 when Confederate Gen. Jubal Early advanced over the farm's fields to attack Union Gen. Philip Sheridan at the nearby Locust Hill property.

    The property is private, and remains in the Washington family.
    #73
  14. vatrader01

    vatrader01 vatrader01

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    Having been convicted of Mopery in ADV Court, I have been sentenced to community service in the form of ditch patrol and marker inventory. My latest contribution:

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    Located on Rt 340 at the WV / MD state line west of Harpers Ferry, WV.

    Picked this up returning from a successful raid on the Maryland tag.
    #74
  15. pnoman

    pnoman Just Average

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    As a youth growing up in WV during the 60s, the worst threat from your parents for misbehaving was, "I'm going to send you to Pruntytown!" The Industrial School for Boys at Pruntytown has a long history, and most of it is quite positive, contrary to popular rumors. Here are a few excerpts from an article by MK Stover in "Wild, Wonderful, West Virginia":

    The name Pruntytown is known to most everyone––male and female—born in West Virginia between the years 1900 and 1975. For most, the name does not conjure images of the small, north-central West Virginia town but of its renowned resident institution, the West Virginia Industrial School for Boys. While most state children—but especially boys—grew up hearing rumors of torture and other terrible acts that might befall anyone unlucky enough to be sent to the facility, those who actually spent their formative years there and who worked there tell a different story. From 1907 to 1982, the Industrial School for Boys was a place where struggling youth received the skills, respect, and guidance necessary to become productive citizens.

    For several years preceding the creation of the West Virginia Reform School (later named the Industrial School) in the state legislative session of 1889, there was a recognized need for a school to serve the "underprivileged boys" of our state. Prior to the passage of the bill, which was introduced by Senator George C. Price of Mineral County, there was no legal distinction made between adults and juveniles. Offenders, whether criminal or status (a juvenile who commits a crime, such as truancy, that is only a crime because he or she is not an adult), could be treated the same in the judicial system without regard to their age. As a result, the state penitentiary in Moundsville housed both boys and men.


    Early in its history, from 1890 to 1907, the West Virginia Industrial School for Boys in Pruntytown, originally named the West Virginia Reform School, earned a statewide reputation as a harshly punitive institution. And, indeed, reliable early reports confirm the use of solitary confinement, shackles, and chains.

    Yet from 1907 to 1933, under the compassionate, 26-year tenure of Superintendent H. E. Flesher, the school became a place where residents experienced respect, consistent discipline, vocational training, and love. Though rumors of mistreatment persisted through the years, with parents even threatening their sons with commitment to "Pruntytown" if they misbehaved, several former residents of the school interviewed anonymously for this article told a much different story. For them, the school offered a haven from dysfunctional home lives and a chance for growth and self-improvement that was not otherwise available to them.

    Moreover, residents of the Industrial School were made to feel an integral part of a whole. A system of campus interreliance ensured the food production needed for physical sustenance; the respect needed for emotional sustenance; and, ultimately, the chance for each boy to become a man capable of contributing to society.


    The West Virginia Industrial School for Boys stood empty from early 1983 until 1985, when it was reopened as a minimum-security correctional facility housing adult male trustees. In 1988, the facility was modified to house female trustees. The Pruntytown Correctional Facility remained co-ed until December 2006, when women were transferred to other facilities. This change provided needed space for male inmates. Currently, there are several inmates at the Pruntytown Correctional Facility who also served time there when it was the West Virginia Industrial School for Boys.

    Click here for the entire article : Part 1 Part 2


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    Historical Marker, located just off Rt 50 south on Rt 250.



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    View of some of the old buildings on the edge of the Correctional Facility. Since it is a prison (minimum security), photos of the main complex are not allowed. There is a large stone building just ahead about 1/4 mile, and several smaller buildings like this scattered around the campus.
    #75
  16. pnoman

    pnoman Just Average

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    Grafton Dam is located on the northern tip of Tygart Lake, about 3 miles south of Grafton. It is one of the big recreational areas in north-central WV, with boaters and skiers crowding the waters in the summertime.

    From the US Army Corps of Engineers website:

    Authorized by the Rivers and Harbors Act of 1935, Tygart Dam was the first of 16 flood control projects in the Pittsburgh District. The project provides flood protection for the Tygart River Valley as well as for the Monongahela and upper Ohio Rivers.
    Tygart has the capability to store the equivalent run-off of 4.56 inches of precipitation from its 1,184 square mile drainage area. The project&#8217;s flood control benefits were dramatically demonstrated during the November 1985 floods when Tygart alone prevented an amazing $195.8 million in damages and lowered flood crests along the Monongahela River by as much as 6.8 feet. Since its completion in 1938, Tygart has prevented flood damages estimated to be nearly $1.2 billion. When compared to the flood control benefits which have resulted, the $18.5 million construction costs are greatly overshadowed.
    In addition to flood control, the Tygart project was also authorized for navigation and water supply purposes. During the summer and fall low-water season, Tygart releases additional water downstream to meet navigation water supply requirements on the Monongahela and upper Ohio River for commercial navigation. The increased flow also improves water quality and quantity for domestic and industrial use, recreation, esthetics and aquatic life.

    For more information from Army Corps of Engineers: Click here

    EDIT: THIS MARKER WAS REPLACED IN 2013. PHOTOS CAN BE FOUND HERE ON PAGE 92, POST #1378.


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    The Historical Marker is located several miles away at the junction of Rt 50 and Rt 119 on the east side of Grafton. (Note: the back side of this sign is badly weathered)


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    View of sign along Rt 50 looking west toward Grafton. Mmmmmm.... KFC!

    EDIT: THIS MARKER WAS REPLACED IN 2013. PHOTOS CAN BE FOUND HERE ON PAGE 92, POST #1378.




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    Grafton Dam. This is as close as you get nowadays without being on the tour, thanks to terrorism and personal injury lawyers. When I was a kid, we would go out on the dam, and my dad would hold me over the edge of the railing. What harm is there in that?? :eek1 :eek1



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    Sign at overlook to dam.
    #76
  17. pnoman

    pnoman Just Average

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    Grafton (Pop 5,489) was founded in 1856 and named after John Grafton, a civil engineer with the B&O Railroad. It's most famous citizen was Anna Jarvis, founder of Mother's Day. (See separate post for photos & info on her birthplace).


    EDIT: THIS MARKER WAS REPLACED IN 2013. PHOTOS CAN BE FOUND HERE ON PAGE 92, POST #1377.


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    Historical Marker located just south of Rt 50 at the junction of Rt 119.



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    The marker is located in a small city park set up at the junction of Rt 50 and Rt 119 to honor the local veterans.

    EDIT: THIS MARKER WAS REPLACED IN 2013. PHOTOS CAN BE FOUND HERE ON PAGE 92, POST #1377.



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    Beautiful downtown Grafton. It has a real "hometown" flavor to it.



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    I had to include this cool old building in downtown Grafton.
    #77
  18. pnoman

    pnoman Just Average

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    Anna Jarvis is best known as the founder of Mother's Day. She was born in Webster WV, located on Rt 119 about 5 miles south of Grafton.

    From Wikipedia:

    Anna Jarvis was born in the tiny town of Webster in Taylor County WV. She was the daughter of Anna Maria Reeves Jarvis. The family moved to nearby Grafton WV in her childhood.
    On May 12, 1907, two years after her mother's death, she held a memorial to her mother and thereafter embarked upon a campaign to make "Mother's Day" a recognized holiday. She succeeded in making this nationally recognized in 1914. The International Mother's Day Shrine was established in Grafton to commemorate her accomplishment.
    By the 1920s, Anna Jarvis had become soured on the commercialization of the holiday. She incorporated herself as the Mother's Day International Association, claimed copyright on the second Sunday of May, and was once arrested for disturbing the peace. She and her sister Ellsinore spent their family inheritance campaigning against the holiday. Both died in poverty. Jarvis, says her New York Times obituary, became embittered because too many people sent their mothers a printed greeting card. As she said, "A printed card means nothing except that you are too lazy to write to the woman who has done more for you than anyone in the world. And candy! You take a box to Mother&#8212;and then eat most of it yourself. A pretty sentiment!"
    Anna Marie Jarvis never married and had no children. She died in Westchester PA, and is buried in West Laurel Hill Cemetery, Bala Cynwyd, Pennsylvania. [End of Quote]

    During the Civil War, Gen. George McClellan used this house as his headquarters while his troops were encamped nearby. At the time, the town of Webster was the southern depot for the train, so it was busy with troops and supplies.

    After the war, Mrs. Jarvis (Anna's mother) worked hard to bring families and communities together who had been torn apart by the war. It was later her wish to have one day each year set aside to honor all mothers. Anna took her mother's desire for this holiday and helped create Mother's Day.



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    Historical marker located on Rt 119 in Webster, about 5 miles south of Grafton.



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    Looking northbound on Rt 119. Anna Jarvis home is on the right.



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    Better view of Anna Jarvis' birthplace.



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    Interesting sign on front lawn.

    **UPDATE**

    I took my wife back here the next day, and we did the tour. It was very interesting. Really! There are even some artifacts from Gen McClellan, including his desk "office". I would highly recommend any husband who needs to score points with the wife to take her here for the tour. And, it's only $5. Say "Hi" to Tiger-Lily, the resident blind cat. Really! For information, call (304) 265-5549. Closed Mondays.



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    Inside the Anna Jarvis house. This square grand piano (Steinway) belonged to Anna's mother. They allowed me to play on it, and I played one verse of "How Great Thou Art", my Grandmother's favorite hymn. Yesterday would have been her birthday.
    #78
  19. pnoman

    pnoman Just Average

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    The original National Cemetery is located on Walnut Street on the south side of Grafton. This cemetery is full, so a new National Cemetery was opened in the 1980s about 5 miles from here, on part of the old Pruntytown Industrial School for Boys property.

    From plaque by the entrance: On the night of May 22, 1861, Pvt Thornsberry Bailey Brown and Lt Daniel Wilson, both members of Capt George R. Latham's Grafton Guards, were returning to Grafton from Pruntytown. Along the Northwestern Turnpike, they encountered three Letcher Guards who commanded Brown and Wilson to halt.

    Brown pulled his pistol and shot, hitting Daniel W.S. Knight on the ear. Knight returned fire, which instantly killed Brown. Thornsberry Bailey Brown was the first Union soldier killed by a Confederate soldier. The next day, Confederate soldiers returned Brown's body to Capt Latham's men. Brown is buried in the Grafton National Cemetery.

    The Grafton Guards would become Company B, 2nd West Virginia Infantry. The Letcher Guards would become Company A, 25th Virginia Infantry.


    For a complete list of soldiers and others buried here, please click here.


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    Historical Marker located on Walnut St south of Grafton.



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    Main entrance to cemetery. Plaque on right side is VA Administration.



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    Some of the headstones - veterans of all wars through WWI, WWII and Korea.



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    View to the left of the entrance.


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    Headstone of Thornsberry Bailey Brown.



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    Preparing to leave. Truly sacred ground!
    #79
  20. vatrader01

    vatrader01 vatrader01

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    Mr. pnoman, I enjoy the effort you put in to submitting nice photos and research. The markers you choose are interesting, and it sure helps keep this thread from getting "dry". Please keep on keepin' on..
    #80