WV Historical Markers - Let's Find All 700

Discussion in 'Southeast, The Lair of the Dragon - The Blue Ridge' started by pnoman, Nov 16, 2008.

  1. pnoman

    pnoman Just Average

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    From WV State History Guide website:

    http://www.shgresources.com/wv/counties/hancock/

    The act creating the county left the location of the county seat to the electorate, which selected New Cumberland over New Manchester by a narrow margin of 13 votes. The county court had been meeting in New Manchester and the judges initially refused to move the court to New Cumberland. A second election was held in 1850, with New Cumberland winning once again, this time by 46 votes. The county court was then moved to New Cumberland, but a third election in 1852 resulted in New Manchester receiving one more vote than New Cumberland. The county seat then returned to New Manchester until later returning to New Cumberland.


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    Historical Marker located in Overlook Park along the Ohio River in New Cumberland.



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    Same Marker - Side #2



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    This marker is in the middle of the group of 7 - the first one past the 2 utility poles.
  2. intothenew

    intothenew Briar Patch Navigator

    Joined:
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    Almost Heaven
    Calhoun Co /Ritchie Co, Rt 16

    Two sad notes to start with:

    1. This could possibly be the only Calhoun County marker out of six that is left standing.

    2. I lied, I didn't give Martha her credit for this one on Saturday. This was the last one before the night in Glenville.

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    From the South

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    From the North

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    They like to ramp it up in Calhoun, especially this time of year.
  3. intothenew

    intothenew Briar Patch Navigator

    Joined:
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    Braxton Co / Gilmer Co, Rt 5

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    From the East

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    From the West

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    I offer some personal notes on these two counties. I have spent a considerable amount of time in both, for various reasons.

    Braxton; You can still buy staples at the bulk food market in Flatwoods. The dinner buffet at the Comfort Hotel across the slab is a cheap fat boys paradise.

    Gilmer; Intothehillsidefarms, as many times as I have seen it, they still amaze me.
  4. intothenew

    intothenew Briar Patch Navigator

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    Helvetia (#2), Junction CR 46 / CR 45, Helvetia

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    From the South

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    From the North

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    pnoman has covered the town well with his grab of the #1 marker. As`with him, I had not had the experience of the culinary skills that awaited here. We took care of that. I thought the food was great, Martha just kept saying "strange". They were a little hard on the pocketbook for lunch. I had to push away from the table early because it was lunch, and only because it was lunch.
  5. pnoman

    pnoman Just Average

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    One of two identical markers in the area. The other (original?) is located south of New Cumberland about 2 miles on Rt 2. This is 1 of 7 markers at the Overlook Park on River Drive in New Cumberland.


    From the WV State History Guide website:

    http://www.shgresources.com/wv/counties/hancock/

    New Cumberland was originally called Brick Bend because of the many brickyards and pottery works that were located there.



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    Historical Marker located in Overlook Park along the Ohio River in New Cumberland.



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    Same Marker - Side #2



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    This is the second marker from the left. (Overlook Park - New Cumberland)
  6. pnoman

    pnoman Just Average

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    One of two identical markers in the area. The other is located in Overlook Park along the Ohio River in New Cumberland, about 2 miles to the north.

    This marker is located on Rt 2 about 2 miles south of New Cumberland.

    From the WV State History Guide website:

    http://www.shgresources.com/wv/counties/hancock/

    New Cumberland was originally called Brick Bend because of the many brickyards and pottery works that were located there.


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    Historical Marker located on Rt 2 at the junction of CR 2/6 about 2 miles south of New Cumberland.



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    Same Marker - Side #2



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    View southbound on Rt 2. (CR 2/6 is visible turning to the left)


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    View northbound on Rt 2. Ohio River is just to the left.


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    This bend in the Ohio River is across the road from the marker. Is this the "Brickyard Bend"??? (looking southwest)


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    CR 2/6 is also known as Ballantyne Road.
  7. pnoman

    pnoman Just Average

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    Marker is located at Overlook Park along the Ohio River in New Cumberland.


    This is about all I could find on Capt Porter:

    From Brick and Clay Record, Vol 28-29: Click here for full text


    The Globe Brick Co., at Globe, W. Va., two miles east of New Cumberland, and the Kenilworth Brick Works, at Kenilworth, ten miles east of that city, are the two properties that are kept in almost constant operation through the personal efforts of Capt. John Porter, one of the ablest and most widely known brick men in the United States. As a slight introduction concerning Capt. Porter, we would say that it was he who is said to have sold the first
    paving-brick in the United States, and this to the city of Charleston, W.Va., far back in the '70's; and the same brick is in use as a pavement today.
    The Globe Company has booked sufficient business to keep the property in constant operation for months to come. Among the orders is 1,400,000 brick to be used in municipal improvements in several parts of Western Pennsylvania. This company has started the erection of two additional 10x30 down-draft kilns, which will be fired for the first time within a month.
    Captain Porter has always been closely associated with the brick and clay industry of West Virginia. While his son, Fred G. Porter, looks after the two factories, Capt. Porter spends considerable time on the road seeking new business, and at the same time maintaining a suite of offices in the Bessemer building, Pittsburg. Captain Porter made New Cumberland famous. It was he who discovered the vastness and richness of the clays to be found in old Hancock county. He was also one of the very first to engage in the manufacture of brick from native fire clays. The Kenilworth plant is one of the most modern along the Ohio Valley. To locate it more clearly in the mindof the reader, this works is reached by trolley from East Liverpool, O., the center of the pottery industry of the United States.
    All the buildings at Kenilworth are of brick. Adjoining the main building is-the boiler house, and it is separated from the main building by a fire wall of brick. This plant also contains three 10-foot tubular boilers and a 32x48inch steam engine. There are two 9-foot Stevenson dry pans and two Bonnot piano wire screens. The capacity of the plant is 65,000 brick daily and 40,000 re-press brick! There arc eight tracks in the tunnels, and the burning is done in a dozen round down-draft kilns.
    At the Globe plant, which has a capacity of 50,000 brick daily; there are 2 Stevenson 9-ft. dry pans; 3 16ft. boilers; one Bonnot stiff-mud brick machine and automatic cutting table, and 10 tracks are used to fill the drying tunnels. There are 11 down-draft kilns at this works, but the company is building two additional kilns which are expected to be in use within a short time.
    Captain Porter is always on the go. He is at home every night, and the business hours of the day are spent either at his comfortable offices in Pittsburg, or else out on the road booking business. Both he and his son are greatly admired by the employes of the two plants, who exert every effort to make the Porter plants the most successful in the Ohio Valley.







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    Historical Marker located in Overlook Park, River Drive, New Cumberland. (Side #1)



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    Same Marker - Side #2. See photo below.

    From an interview with Mr Leslie Cuppie on Nov 19,1975. (He was the great-great-grandson of the town founder, John Cuppy)

    Very interesting interview: (see pg 20) http://digital.maag.ysu.edu/jspui/bitstream/1989/888/2/OH58.pdf

    "The China Company was in the lower town, right above the stack. It has changed hands several times. First it was known as the Chelsea China Company and they made dishes. It was rebuilt after the fire and then it was shut down. It has been a porcelain factory since that and also a pottery. The Cronin brothers were the ones who rebuilt it. Part of it was torn down and during the war they made shells in the part that was left. It burned down here one Sunday morning during church time."



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    Overlook Park, New Cumberland. This marker is the 3rd from the far end. (the 2nd marker past the 2 utility poles)



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    Outline foundation of the old Chelsea China Company. Located south of the Overlook Park on OLD Rt 2 (passes through a residential area) about 1 mile.
  8. pnoman

    pnoman Just Average

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    Spreadsheet is updated to Post #1167 (14 April 2010)

    Total Markers Documented: Appx 834

    Total Markers Remaining (Available): 42 (Accounting for duplicate listings on County line markers)

    Total Missing: Appx 300

    (Confirmed) - Appx 100
    (Not Confirmed) - Appx 200
  9. pnoman

    pnoman Just Average

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    One of two (almost) identical markers in the area. The other is located on Rt 2 southbound leaving the downtown New Cumberland area, about 1/2 mile south of the Court House.

    This marker is located in Overlook Park on River Drive in New Cumberland, appx 15 miles from the northern tip of WV, along the Ohio River. It is one of 7 markers at the park.

    From the WV State History Guide website: http://www.shgresources.com/wv/counties/hancock/

    New Cumberland was originally called Brick Bend because of the many brickyards and pottery works that were located there. The city was begun in 1784 and named Cuppytown for its founder, John Cuppy. In 1839, John Cuppy formally laid out the town into 42 lots and called it Vernon, but later changed the name to New Cumberland in deference to the wishes of the first purchasers of the lots. The town was incorporated by the West Virginia state legislature in 1872.


    For more information from Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Cumberland,_West_Virginia



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    Historical Marker #1 located at Overlook Park on River Drive in New Cumberland, between Rt 2 and the Ohio River.



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    Same Marker - Side #2


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    Overlook Park - New Cumberland. This marker is the next to the last one on the far right (just to the left of the bright white one).


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    From up on the hill next to the County Court House, this is a view of New Cumberland looking to the southwest. The hills in the distance are actually Ohio - just across the Ohio River.



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    Same location, looking to the northwest. Overlook Park (where the 7 markers are located) is located near that tall green pine tree behind the brick buildings in the center of the photo. Again, the hills in the background are in Ohio, just across the Ohio River.
  10. pnoman

    pnoman Just Average

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    This is perhaps the original marker (one of two almost identical markers in the area). The other is located in Overlook Park on River Drive in New Cumberland, along with 6 other markers).

    This marker is located on Rt 2 southbound, about 1/2 mile south of the County Courthouse.

    For information and links about New Cumberland, please see previous post. (#1169)



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    Historical Marker (#2) located on Rt 2 about 1/2 mile south of the Hancock County Court House in New Cumberland.



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    Same Marker - Side #2



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    View northbound on Rt 2 entering New Cumberland.



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    View southbound on Rt 2 leaving New Cumberland.
  11. pnoman

    pnoman Just Average

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    Joe Geiger replied:

    The Salt Rock marker is on County Route 45 (Roach Road) at the Salt Rock Community Park, not far from the intersection with WV 10. I’m not sure why it was moved from WV10 but It has been at this location for as long as I can remember. <?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:eek:ffice:eek:ffice" /><o:p></o:p>
    <o:p> </o:p>
    The Indian Mound marker in South Charleston was sent in for refurbishment and returned this winter, and I’m sure it will be installed soon if it has not been already. It is right by the mound, visible from US 60.<o:p></o:p>
    <o:p> </o:p>
    Washington’s Land in Dunbar – I’ll try to look this weekend. I know it was close to the Dunbar bridge.<o:p></o:p>
  12. pnoman

    pnoman Just Average

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    I started this one back on Post #982, but the Marker was removed from the pole by the construction company working on the new 4-lane highway (Corridor H) through the nearby area. Since then, the Marker has been replaced on the pole, and I was able to get through the construction area to get photos of Greenland Gap.

    A few links:

    Nature Conservancy: http://www.nature.org/wherewework/northamerica/states/westvirginia/preserves/art1203.html

    WV Civil War: http://www.wvcivilwar.com/14thinf.shtml

    First - a recap of a few of the original photos:


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    Safe and sound in the construction company office trailer.



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    Empty pole (white pole near right side, in the church lawn) marks the spot.


    **********************************


    I was in the area in late March, and found this:



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    Historical Marker back home on it's pole, at the intersection of Rt 42 and Rt 93 at Scherr, about 20 miles north of Petersburg.



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    View northbound looking towards the GREAT ride up Rt 42/93 to Mt. Storm Lake. :D



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    View east from Scherr looking into Greenland Gap - CR 1


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    In the heart of Greenland Gap, about 3 miles east of Scherr.


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    From the east side of Greenland Gap, looking back toward Scherr. This is probably what the construction area on the opposite side of the gap looked like before the work started.


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    Remember the nice view of the Gap a few photos ago? Well, as Paul Harvey would say, "Here's the rest of the story." Standing near same spot I took the previous photo, I adjusted the camera for wide angle. The road construction through this area has devastated the landscape. How can it ever match the beauty it once had? :cry :cry :cry

    Of course, the DOH and the construction company assure everyone that none of the construction was in the actual Greenland Gap area. Maybe, but this close??? You be the judge.



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    More of the senseless destruction. Less than 1 mile from the entrance to Greenland Gap. Standing in about the same spot as the previous photo - looking north.


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    And more. Standing in the same spot, looking south. What a shame to see such pristine landscape scarred forever. Of course, people driving by at 65 MPH will only notice for a few seconds, if at all.

    For a great article on the impact to the area written by a local :

    http://www.wvhighlands.org/VoicePast/VoiceOct00/GrnlandGap.DK.Oct00Voice.htm


    OK, I'll get off my soapbox. Sorry.
  13. pnoman

    pnoman Just Average

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    One of 7 Markers located in Overlook Park along the Ohio River in New Cumberland.

    Summarized From Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ohio_River

    The Ohio River is the largest tributary (by volume) of the Mississippi River. It flows 981 miles, starting in Pittsburgh at the confluence of the Allegheny River and Monongahela River. At it's widest point near Louisville, KY, it is nearly a mile across. It joins the Mississippi River near Cairo, IL.



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    Historical Marker located in Overlook Park on River Drive in New Cumberland.



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    Same Marker - Side #2 (Different inscription than Side #1)


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    Overlook Park in New Cumberland. This marker is one of seven in the park, and is the last one on the right. (The bright white one)



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    View across the Ohio River to Ohio.
  14. pnoman

    pnoman Just Average

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    Before I continue south, I wanted to add the following from Hancock County:

    JamNut discovered this "unlisted" marker on a WV Tag-O-Rama quest. At my request, he posted the photo on this thread (see Post #1,000). I happened to be in the area a few weeks ago, and stopped to explore and take a few additional photos.

    From a geo-caching website: Click here for photo and more info

    Hartford's Mill was built on tract of land that was purchased by the Joseph Coulter family on Dec. 17,1834 for $600. It measured 264 acres, 3 rods, and 27 perches. There is an old roadbed that leads to the site from Lower Laurel Trail. All that remains is the front stone wall of the mill, bricks from the boiler chimney, and some cut stones. There was even a coal mine on the other side of the stream that supplied fuel for the steam engine in later years. The mill was finally lost in 1905 for failure to pay the taxes on it. All that remains of the mill is several cut stones, bricks from the boiler chimney, and the front wall of the mill. There was a coal mine on the other side of the stream that supplied fuel for the boiler and steam engine.



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    Historical Marker located in Tomlinson Run State Park, appx 1/4 mile off Rt 8, by the entrance to the campground.


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    Same Marker - Side #2



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    Marker is set with an old mill stone and informational sign.



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    Another view of the area with the marker, mill stone, and informational sign.



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    Mill stone and sign.



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    Close-up of sign.
  15. pnoman

    pnoman Just Average

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    Located about 2 miles north of Weirton, and about 1-1/2 miles east of Rt 2 on King's Creek Road (CR 11)

    Notes from the Nomination Form for the National Register of Historic Places, Dec 1975.


    Tne Peter Tarr Furnace on Kings Creek near the present Weirton, West Virginia,was firsts built and operated during the decade of the 1790s by an obscure man named Grant. Improved by Tarr 's company, the structure--with
    its unusual frustumshaped stack--was quite possibly the f i r s t iron furnace i n operation west of the Alleghenies and helped influence settlement and commercial patterns. During its thirty or so years of service, the furnace was the focal point of the making and sale of skillets , kettles , grates and other household utensils. In time of need, the operation also produced cannon balls of small diameter, some of which were said to have been used by Commodore Perry's fleet at the Battle of Lake Erie during the War of 1812.As settlers pushed over the mountains in ever increasing numbers after theRevolutionary War, a need arose for some fundamental industries to supply what otherwise had to be transported from the east or roughly manufactured at home.
    Iron products of all types were in greater demand than the supply could fulfill.
    Not too far from the Ohio River near what is now Weirton, West Virginia, an attempt was made to help alleviate the shortage. A man named Grant made an agreement to build an iron furnace sometime between 1790 and 1794, and the land on which it was constructed was deeded by James Campbell and his wife to Peter Tarr and James Rankin in 1801. Indications are that Grant's furnace was the first built west of the Allegheny mountains ; Tarr and company made it a going and growing concern.
    Using timber from the surrounding hills , the small group of workers could produce no more than about 2 tons of iron per day. Much of the metal was formed into household'utensils and sold on the premises or sent to Wellsburg or Pittsburgh. Such production helped spur commerce and settlement in the area, and it is only fitting that it is today still a center of the iron and steel industry.
    The Tarr furnace has an unusual design. Although the area in which fire and ore mixed to form the molten material from which articles were made was similar to others, its oval salamander is interesting. Of greater interest is the fact that the chimney, or stack, is circular in dimension. Most other furnaces of the period and area had square or rectangular chimneys.
    Before ending its production of iron materials sometime after 1815, the furnace helped the infant United States' war effort during the War of 1812 by producing small-diameter cannon balls for use by the navy. It is believed that some of these were delivered to Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry's fleet at Lake Erie and were used during his famous battle on that inland body of water.
    The uniquely constructed Peter Tarr Furnace, then, played an important role in early industrial and commercial development of the upper Ohio valley region and helped spur settlement west of the Allegheny mountains. In its own small way, it also contributed to the continuing defense of American independence. Continued archeological work at the furnace site is possible, for the original foundation and salamander are basically intact below ground level. In addition, much of the stone used in the 1968 reconstruction of the furnace was from the site.


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    Historical Marker located on Rt 2 about 2 miles north of Weirton.



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    Same Marker - Side #2, obscured by bushes.



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    View northbound on Rt 2. Marker is only visible to northbound traffic due to bushes.



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    View southbound on Rt 2. Outline of Marker is seen in bushes to the left.



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    Peter Tarr Furnace located about 1-1/2 miles east of Rt 2 on King's Creek Road.




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    Informational plaque nest to the furnace.

    Those of you who watch/participate in the WV Tag-O-Rama will recognize this as one of my tags in April. :D










  16. pnoman

    pnoman Just Average

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Morgantown, WVa
  17. pnoman

    pnoman Just Average

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    First permanent white settlement in Hancock County. One of 4 communities that merged in 1947 to form Weirton, one of the largest steel-producing cities in the nation.

    John Holliday's Fort
    (1776 - 1790's), Hollidays Cove
    A settlers' fort used as a Patriot supply depot during the 1777 British attack on Fort Henry. Accidently burned down in 1781 and later rebuilt. It was still in use in 1793.

    For more information: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hollidays_Cove,_West_Virginia

    Excerpt from Wikipedia: The small village called Holliday's Cove&#8212;which is now most of downtown Weirton&#8212;was founded in the late 1700s. (It eventually lost the apostrophe.) In 1909, Ernest T. Weir, built a steel mill later known as Weirton Steel Corporation just north of Hollidays Cove. An unincorporated settlement called Weirton grew up around the mill that by 1940 was said to be the largest unincorporated city in the United States. By then Hollidays Cove and two other outlying areas, Weirton Heights and Marland Heights, which as their names suggest were on hilltops or ridges surrounding the "Weir&#8211;Cove" area, had also incorporated.
    On July 1, 1947, all of these areas &#8212; Hollidays Cove, Marland Heights, Weirton Heights, and unincorporated Weirton &#8212; merged and formed the City of Weirton as it currently exists.



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    Historical Marker located on Cove St, about 100 feet east of Rt 2.



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    Same marker - Side #2



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    Westbound view of the marker. Rt 2 is visible ahead going left (south) and right (north). The marker is in a small outdoor patio / garden area next to an office building.
  18. pnoman

    pnoman Just Average

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    Located on Rt 105 in Weirton, about 2 - 3 miles east of Rt 2 at South 17th St. This road runs along the northern edge of Weirton to the PA border.

    I Googled and Binged and came up empty. If anyone wants to add historical notes (or email them to me to add to this post), that would be nice.



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    Historical Marker located on Rt 105 in Weirton about 2 - 3 miles east of Rt 2.



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    Same marker - Side #2



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    View westbound on Rt 105. Marker is on the left side of the photo.



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    View eastbound on Rt 105. Yes, it's sitting in a used car lot! :eek1

    The church would have been to your right about 100 yards.



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    View south into the residential area where the church once stood. I rode around a few blocks, and the only thing I could find that could possibly be connected is an empty plot on the next block. Maybe they can't build a house where a church used to be???
  19. Rider_WV

    Rider_WV Long timer

    Joined:
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    Leon, WV
    General McCausland Marker on Rt 35 in Mason County. About 2 miles north of the mason/putnam line. I looked for this marker in the fall but it wasnt in place at that time.

    Marker facing North
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    Marker facing south
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    The old homestead. Structure isnt in very good condition. Beautiful land though.
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    A nice Mail Pouch Barn across the road.
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    some interesting history on the General

    http://www.wvculture.org/history/journal_wvh/wvh4-1.html
  20. Rider_WV

    Rider_WV Long timer

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    Location:
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    The Marker is broken off but the post is in place.

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