WV Historical Markers - Let's Find All 700

Discussion in 'Southeast, The Lair of the Dragon - The Blue Ridge' started by pnoman, Nov 16, 2008.

  1. pnoman

    pnoman Just Average

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2006
    Oddometer:
    2,404
    Location:
    Morgantown, WVa
    Located along Rt 50 about 15 miles west of Clarksburg, Salem has a population of about 2000. It is the home of Salem International University and the West Virginia Industrial Home for Youth (see previous post). It's also home of the Apple Butter Fesitval each summer.

    Salem International University was founded as Salem College by the Seventh Day Baptist Church in 1888. It soon became a non-sectarian nonprofit college. Over the next 100 years, the school continued as a liberal arts, teacher education, and nursing college. In 1989 it formed an alliance with Tokyo University, which changed the focus of the school to one of education of international students in a unique atmosphere. Salem College was renamed Salem-Teikyo University. The alliance with Teikyo ended in 2000, when the school was purchased by investors from Singapore. At that time, the school changed its name to Salem International University. Salem International University was acquired by Salem Education, LLC in June 2005.
    <SUP></SUP>

    For more information on Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salem,_West_Virginia



    [​IMG]
    Historical Marker located along Main St about 1/4 mile west of downtown.




    [​IMG]
    There is a memorial located alongside the marker with this cool cannon.



    [​IMG]
    A little better view of the marker and memorial area.




    [​IMG]
    View of downtown Salem, looking westbound on Main St.



    [​IMG]
    This historic old train depot in downtown Salem burned in late 2008, taking with it many irreplaceable photos and artifacts. :cry
  2. pnoman

    pnoman Just Average

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2006
    Oddometer:
    2,404
    Location:
    Morgantown, WVa
    Located on Rt 23 about 10 miles northwest of Salem. The citizens of Center Point restored the bridge in the early 1980s, then did a complete restoration in 2004.

    Excerpt from the Nomination Form for the National Register for Historic Places:







    The Center Point Covered Bridge is significant because
    it is one of only

    17 Covered bridges remaining in West Virginia. It is the remnant of a unique
    and once flourishing engineering form - the American timbered covered bridge.
    Such bridges once carried a huge volume of the traffic in rural areas and small
    towns of America. It was the timber truss node of covered bridges (such a s
    Center Point's Long system or' 4"x" panels) that gave rise to the a l l metal truss
    bridge that is also recognized as an American contribution to world engineering.
    The Center Point Covered Bridge is significant to Doddridge County, in particular,
    as the only remaining covered bridge in the county.
    On July 13, 1888, the Doddridge County Court ordered that G.W. Ice be
    appointed a commissioner to supply specifications for a bridge to span the
    Middle Fork of McElroy Creek i n the XcClellan District . Ice was also ordered to
    advertise and let out the contract for building the bridge and to superintend
    the construction (1). The records indicate that T.W. Ancell and E. Underwood
    built abutments and John Ash and S.H. Smith built superstructures for at least



    two bridges in the McClellan District .

    To see the complete document:

    http://www.wvculture.org/shpo/nr/pdf/doddridge/83003235.pdf



    [​IMG]
    Historical Marker located on Rt 23 about 10 miles northwest of Rt 50.



    [​IMG]
    View looking southeast on Rt 23. (No, that's not the bridge :lol3 )




    [​IMG]
    That's the bridge! Located about 100 meters north of the junction of Rt 23 and CR 10.



    [​IMG]
    Here's a better view of the covered bridge.




    [​IMG]
    Inside the bridge.

    Rt 23 is a great ride! However, take it easy, since there are 20'-30' dropoffs just a few feet off the narrow road. Overcook one of the 15 MPH hairpins, and you'll be airborne before landing in a farmer's field. Oh, yeah, and watch out for 6-Inch rocks in the road from the adjoining hillside cuts. :eek1 I'd like to take Rt 23 up to Middlebourne sometime. (Maybe my next sign-hunting trip).



    Update: April 2011 - Marker has been refurbished. (See below)

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]
  3. pnoman

    pnoman Just Average

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2006
    Oddometer:
    2,404
    Location:
    Morgantown, WVa
    Located on Rt 23 about 3 miles northwest of Salem and Rt 50.



    [​IMG]
    Historical Marker, located on Rt 23 about 3 miles northwest of junction with Rt 50. The sign is situated behind a wood post, which is why the photo is taken at an angle. This is heading northwest into Doddridge Co.




    [​IMG]
    View northwest on Rt 23 entering Doddridge Co.




    [​IMG]
    Flip side of Historical Marker - Rt 23 heading southeast back in to Harrison Co.


    [​IMG]
    View of Rt 23 southeast coming into Harrison Co.


    Like I said on the previous post, Rt 23 is a fun - narrow, winding, challenging - ride. Watch out for rocks in the road, log trucks, and dropoffs 3 feet from the edge of the road, and you'll have a great ride.
  4. freaking RT

    freaking RT will golf for food

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2001
    Oddometer:
    39,652
    Location:
    just outside Richmond, VA
    nice work :thumb
  5. vatrader01

    vatrader01 vatrader01

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2007
    Oddometer:
    1,164
    Location:
    Gateway to Skyline Drive, Virginia
    The markers in this post are all in or near Martinsburg, Berkeley County WV.

    Let me set the stage a bit, for those not familiar with the area. Martinsburg is located in the Eastern Panhandle of West Virginia. A hub center for commerce since it's beginning, Martinsburg still serves as the center of commerce in the area.

    Major private employers in and around Martinsburg include Quad/Graphics, EcoLab, Orgill, Quebecor World, Sino-Swearingen, and Fedex.
    The city also houses one of the two Enterprise Computing Centers of the IRS(the other is in Memphis, Tennessee). The Martinsburg facility processes most of the country's electronically filed tax documents from businesses, and about one-third of electronically-filed tax returns.
    The ATF has a building located in Martinsburg, where they deal with crimes involving alcohol, tobacco, firearms, and explosives from the United States and other places in the world. This is the only building of the ATF that does these types of things.
    Martinsburg had its own automobile company, called Norwalk. The cars that were assembled here are the longest-made known cars to be built in the state of West Virginia.
    The area is also home to the 167th Airwing Lift of the West Virginia Air National Guard.
    Located on Interstate 81, Route 11, Routes 45, 901 and 9 and numerous cow trails that run into town, traffic can be a force to contend with.
    There is Amtrack service, MARC RAIL, Maryland's train transit system.

    Martinsburg was founded by General Adam Stephen in 1778 and named for Colonel Thomas B. Martin, nephew of Lord Fairfax, 6th Lord Fairfax of Cameron.

    I think that covers the who, what where and when. Now the markers.

    Marker located on Routes 9 / 11, located on the right traveling east.

    [​IMG]

    Located on Williamsport Pike [Route 11], on the right traveling north, about 1/4 mile north of Warm Springs Road.

    [​IMG]

    Fort Neally was founded possibly as early as 1755 by John Neally about four miles south of present day Martinsburg. In addition to it's use as a fort during the Indian wars era, it was used around 1757 for the colonial militia.

    This one was a twofer. Two for one post.
    Railroad strike of 1877

    [​IMG]

    After the Great Railroad Strike of 1877, union organizers planned for their next battles, while politicians and business leaders took steps to ensure that such chaos could not reoccur. Many states enacted conspiracy statutes. States formed new militia units, and National Guard armories were constructed in a number of cities. For workers and employers alike, the strikes had shown the power of workers in combination to challenge the status quo. They were driven, as a Pittsburgh state militiaman, who was ordered to break the 1877 strike, pointed out, by &#8220;one spirit and one purpose among them&#8211;that they were justified in resorting to any means to break down the power of the corporations."

    Archive image
    [​IMG]

    The other side of the marker:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Roundhouse ruins

    [​IMG]

    The Railroad Strike and Roundhouse markers are located at the east end of East Martin Street, Martinsburg, at the Rail Station.

    This marker is at 515 West Martin St., Martinsburg.

    [​IMG]

    This marker is located in front of the Ramer Center, which is home to the Sumner Ramer African American School Museum and The Berkeley County Schools&#8217; Instructional Resource Center, Media Services and Special Education departments.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    General Adam Stephen. Marker is at 309 E John St., Martinsburg.

    [​IMG]

    General Adam Stephen has a brief bio in post 102 of this thread.

    Constructed of native limestone.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    Van Metre Ford Bridge.

    Marker is at the intersection of Flaggs Crossing Road and Blairton Road on Flaggs Crossing Road.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Check the guy in the creek. He's got one on.

    [​IMG]

    Veterans Administration Center

    Marker is at the intersection of Baker Road and Route 9, in the median.

    [​IMG]

    One of four Veterans Administration Centers in West Virginia.

    [​IMG]

    Spelling allowances, based on services provided.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Since the beginning of man's history, all great nations have honored, respected, and provided certain benefits for their veterans, realizing that had it not been for the sacrifices of the men and women who fought their battles, the nations themselves would cease to exist.
    All know that veterans have made many sacrifices for their country, which are not demanded of the majority of citizens. For this reason, veterans are a special group, which have earned specific consideration. While needs may be considerable, what we offer falls short of what is due.


    Marker at 601 South Queen St., Martinsburg.

    [​IMG]

    Boydville Mansion
    [​IMG]



    Then there was the one that got away.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    This was on one side...

    [​IMG]

    The other side said this...

    [​IMG]

    Like the last pay check. Gone.
  6. pnoman

    pnoman Just Average

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2006
    Oddometer:
    2,404
    Location:
    Morgantown, WVa
    vatrader01,

    Excellent photos and write-ups! :clap

    I rode over to Buckhannon / Elkins / Seneca Rocks Thursday afternoon and photo'd several markers. I was just getting ready to post a few when I saw your newest additions. Thanks!

    Sorry I've not had time to keep the master list updated - I had to run over to Mt Storm last week to grab the WV tag :D and work has been keeping me busy. (The latest honey-do is stripping wallpaper and re-doing the bathroom :eek1 ).

    Well, I'd better finish getting my latest markers posted. Thanks again!!!
  7. pnoman

    pnoman Just Average

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2006
    Oddometer:
    2,404
    Location:
    Morgantown, WVa
    Located on Rt 33 about midway between Weston and Buckhannon. Not much information is available except what's on the marker.

    Rt 33 is all 4-lane, with bits and pieces of the old 2-lane remaining along either side of the highway. For a 4-lane, it's a rather pleasant ride.



    [​IMG]
    Historical Marker located on Rt 33 just east of the Upshur Co/Lewis Co line.

    For more information on the Staunton=Parkersburg Turnpike: http://www.byways.org/explore/byways/10351/



    [​IMG]
    View westbound on Rt 33.



    [​IMG]
    View eastbound (toward Buckhannon) on Rt 33.
  8. pnoman

    pnoman Just Average

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2006
    Oddometer:
    2,404
    Location:
    Morgantown, WVa
    As the westward expansion moved the population center in the same direction, it passed through WV on 4 consecutive censuses (census, censi? - whatever). This was the spot in 1840.



    [​IMG]
    Historical Marker located on Rt 33 just east of the Lewis Co/ Upshur Co line (about 1 mile west of the Lorentz marker in the previous post.) Located on the westbound lanes.



    [​IMG]
    View west on Rt 33.

    The Center of Population has moved westward at about 100 miles per year, and now resides in Phelps Co, Missouri. To see the different population centers throughout the past 200 years: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mean_center_of_United_States_population
  9. pnoman

    pnoman Just Average

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2006
    Oddometer:
    2,404
    Location:
    Morgantown, WVa
    Population appx 7,500. Located 30 miles south of Clarksburg and 25 miles west of Elkins along the new Rt 33 Corrider. Home of WV Wesleyan College, Strawberry Festival. Gained national attention in 2006 after the Sago Mine explosion (about 8 miles south) that killed 12 trapped miners. It's a nice town to walk around in - nice downtown area.




    [​IMG]
    Historical Marker located in front of Courthouse in downtown Buckhannon. (Side 1)



    [​IMG]
    Side 2 of same marker.




    [​IMG]
    Courthouse (Historical Marker is located next to sidewalk on the right)



    For more information on Buckhannon: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buckhannon,_West_Virginia

    For more information on Samuel and John Pringle: http://www.hackerscreek.com/pringle.htm

    For more information on Thomas Walker Gilmer: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Walker_Gilmer

    For more information on the Sago Mine Disaster: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sago_Mine_Tragedy
  10. pnoman

    pnoman Just Average

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2006
    Oddometer:
    2,404
    Location:
    Morgantown, WVa
    Located about 3 miles south of Junior, just north of the junction with Rt 33.

    For more on Barbour County: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbour_County,_West_Virginia

    For more on Randolph County: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Randolph_County,_West_Virginia


    There are a lot of great roads in Randolph County, as it is really at the edge of the Allegheny Mountains. Anything west of Elkins is what I consider "foothills". Still lots of great roads, but not a lot of elevation change. Just east of Elkins are 4 mountains within Randolph County on Rt 33/55 alone - Shavers, Rich (lots of history there!), Middle, and Allegheny. All are between 2,000 - 3,500 foot elevation.




    [​IMG]
    Historical Marker located on Rt 250/92 south of Junior. (Side 1)




    [​IMG]
    View south on Rt 250/92 into Randolph Co. That's the Tygart Valley River to the right (See previous post on Grafton - Tygart Dam)




    [​IMG]
    Historical Marker - Side 2.



    [​IMG]
    View north on Rt 250/92 into Barbour Co.
  11. pnoman

    pnoman Just Average

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2006
    Oddometer:
    2,404
    Location:
    Morgantown, WVa
    Located near Davis & Elkins College on the west side of Elkins.

    The following notes are taken from an article by the WV Dept of Agriculture:

    The home was created in 1909 by an act of the Legislature and is the only state-operated residential youth facility in West Virginia . Annually, approximately 60 individuals come to the facility for 6-12 months each.
    The West Virginia Children's Home provides residential social services to youth ages 11 to 17 from all 55 counties in West Virginia . The facility is licensed for 25 residents, and provides private rooms, semiprivate rooms and dormitory style housing.

    Programs are tailored to individual needs, but typically focus on developing skills and techniques to help residents develop positive life skills and overcome unhealthy thinking and behavior. The home also includes a school that is fully accredited by the West Virginia Department of Education where residents are instructed in all required subject matter areas.



    [​IMG]
    Historical Marker located southbound lane of Rt 219 entering Elkins on the west end of town.




    [​IMG]
    WV Children's Home. Located 1/4 mile up the street where you turn off for the marker.
  12. pnoman

    pnoman Just Average

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2006
    Oddometer:
    2,404
    Location:
    Morgantown, WVa
    Located where the Eastern Panhandle meets the main body of WV, about 30 miles southwest of the Fairfax Stone. Incorporated in 1890, and named for Senator Stephen Benton Elkins. Home of the Forest Festival each October. Home of Davis and Elkins College. As you are heading eastbound, it is sort of the gateway to the Allegheny Mountains, as there is more elevation change just east of the city. Population: 7000. Elkins is a great "home base" for exploring WV, as many great rides are north (Thomas, Davis), east (Seneca Rocks, Petersburg, Smoke Hole, Franklin), and south (Cass, Green Bank, Webster Springs, Marlinton). It's hard to go wrong from here!

    For more information: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elkins,_West_Virginia



    [​IMG]
    Historical Marker located along the main highway through town (Rt 250/219/33/55) at the courthouse.



    [​IMG]
    Better view of the courthouse.



    [​IMG]
    View west on Rt 251/219/55/33 as it passes through Elkins.



    [​IMG]
    Old train station in the downtown section.



    [​IMG]
    Still a nice downtown area - WalMart hasn't killed every Main St (yet).
  13. pnoman

    pnoman Just Average

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2006
    Oddometer:
    2,404
    Location:
    Morgantown, WVa
    Located on old Rt 33 near Bowden Fish Hatchery, about 8 miles east of Elkins.

    Excerpts from "A Handbook of the Petroleum Industry":

    Big lime (of Kentucky, West Virginia, southern Pennsylvania and southeastern Ohio).—The geologic formation which is the Maxville limestone in southeastern Ohio and the Greenbrier limestone in West Virginia, and which may be continuous with the Ste. Geneviève and St. Louis limestones of Kentucky, must not be confused with the Big lime of the Central Ohio fields, which is of Devonian and Silurian age and not of Mississippian. The Big lime which is now being discussed is a formation which is generally productive in southeastern Ohio, often 'in the same areas in which the underlying Keener is productive. In Martin, Floyd and Knott counties, Kentucky, it is important from the standpoint of natural gas, which is contained in a thin lens of tan sand lying in the midst of the limestone. The thickness of the Big lime in Ohio and West Virginia ranges from a few feet up to 100 feet or more; but in Kentucky it is sometimes over 1000 feet in thickness.

    Big Injun sand.—About 1200 feet below the Pittsburgh coal is the Big Injun—one of the thickest sands in the Appalachian basin, ranging from 50 to more than 400 feet. though not as important a producer as some other sands. It attains its best development in West Virginia and Pennsylvania, although it exists in eastern Kentucky and Ohio. It is productive at many places in southeastern Ohio. It is rather coarse in texture, and in many places contains pebbly layers which constitute the "pays." The Big Injun is generally water-bearing, and wells in it may be drowned out by the influx of water. In some places it is separated by shales into several sands. It belongs in the Mountain sand group of northern Pennsylvania; at Washington, Pennsylvania, it is called the Manifold sand, while its geologic equivalent is the Burgoon sandstone of Pocono age.
    <!-- Content from Google Book Search, generated at 1236939232630685 -->


    [​IMG]
    Historical Marker located on Old Rt 33 near Bowden Fish Hatchery.



    [​IMG]
    Same sign, different view.



    [​IMG]
    View of the rock formation and turnoff.



    [​IMG]
    View eastbound on Old Rt 33. The end of the new 4-lane is about a mile ahead.


    This section of Old Rt 33 is an interesting detour from the new 4-lane that extends east from Elkins. It starts at the top of the first mountain as you are heading east out of Elkins, and comes out at the very end of the 4-lane about 5 miles later.

    Check out Bowden Fish Hatchery while you're there. http://www.randolphcountywv.com/Agri_EcoTourism/BowdenNationalFishHatchery.htm
  14. Belg

    Belg Long timer

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2005
    Oddometer:
    3,940
    Location:
    Front Royal, VA

    Hahahah

    So that was an ADV'er. In the second picture, on the left hand side, in front of the white building (That's the smokehouse, and may well be the oldest building in Jefferson County), Is me wondering if you're coming up the driveway to say hi... My GS was parked not too far off my right shoulder.

    LOL

    http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=420371
  15. vatrader01

    vatrader01 vatrader01

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2007
    Oddometer:
    1,164
    Location:
    Gateway to Skyline Drive, Virginia
    [​IMG]

    Marker is located in Tucker County, on US 219 .25 miles south of WV Route 9 on the right driving north.

    [​IMG]
    The inscription reads:

    This monument, at the headspring of the Potomac River, marks one of the historic spots of America. Its name is derived from Thomas Lord Fairfax who owned all the land lying between the Potomac and Rappahannock rivers. The first Fairfax Stone, marked by "FX", was set in 1746 by Thomas Lewis, a surveyor employed by Lord Fairfax. This is the base point for the western dividing line between Maryland and West Virginia.


    [​IMG]

    Headspring of the Potomac River.
    From Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fairfax_Stone#References

    The Fairfax Stone is located in Fairfax Stone State Park, just north of the marker.
  16. vatrader01

    vatrader01 vatrader01

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2007
    Oddometer:
    1,164
    Location:
    Gateway to Skyline Drive, Virginia
    [​IMG]

    Marker is located in Thomas, Tucker County WV on Route 219 / 32 near the bridge.

    More information on the falls can be found here:

    http://www.blackwaterfalls.com/

    [​IMG]
  17. pnoman

    pnoman Just Average

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2006
    Oddometer:
    2,404
    Location:
    Morgantown, WVa
    Located at the summit of Allegheny Mt. between Harmon and Seneca Rocks on one of my favorite roads to ride in all of WV, Rt 33/55.



    [​IMG]
    Historical Marker westbound entering Randolph Co. on Rt 33/55.



    [​IMG]
    What a view! Harmon is just ahead about 5 miles. There is a cool old house just on the other side of the knoll to the left. I always thought that would be a great place to live.



    [​IMG]
    Same marker, eastbound heading into Pendleton Co. Look at the list of great destinations: Seneca Rocks, Smoke Hole, Spruce Knob. :D



    [​IMG]
    Eastbound entering Pendleton County. Also the summit of Allegheny Mt (Elevation 3295 ft) and the Eastern Continental Divide.
  18. pnoman

    pnoman Just Average

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2006
    Oddometer:
    2,404
    Location:
    Morgantown, WVa
    The same inscription as the previous marker just east of Elkins by Bowden Fish Hatchery (See Post # 173). This marker is located on Rt 32 north of Harmon, appx 1/4 mile from the 3-way junction of Rt 33/55 and Rt 32.

    To read more about the Big Lime and Big Injun Sands, go back to Post #173.



    [​IMG]
    Historical Marker located on Rt 32 1/4 mile north of Harmon.




    [​IMG]
    I had to maneuver around to get this shot - to avoid all of the garbage that has been thrown out in this turnoff across the road from the marker. It looks like the place to dump your unwanted "stuff". :cry
  19. pnoman

    pnoman Just Average

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2006
    Oddometer:
    2,404
    Location:
    Morgantown, WVa
    The term Tory or Loyalist was used in the American Revolution to describe those who remained loyal to the British Crown. At the beginning of the war, it was estimated that as much as 40% of the American population were Tories.

    To read more about Tories: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tory

    ***************

    The Shawnee Trail was the white settlers' name for an American Indian trail in what is now eastern West Virginia. The name Shawnee came after said group of Native Americans followed the trail our of the region after burning Fort Seybert in Pendleton County, WV. It was a segment (or branch) of the much larger Indian trail network known as the Great Indian Warpath (GIW), which stretched from New York to Georgia. The GIW was referred to from this point north as the "Seneca Trail". Thus, in pioneer days, the segment known as the Shawnee Trail was often also referred to as the Seneca Trail.

    To read more about the Seneca Trail: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shawnee_Trail_(West_Virginia)




    [​IMG]
    Historical Marker located on Rt 33/55 about 2 miles west of Harmon. (Side 1 - You are facing west if you are reading this) I rode around looking for the camp remains for an hour with no luck. The closest I think I got was a locked gate just off CR29.



    [​IMG]
    Looking westbound on Rt 33/55 starting up Rich Mt. (A whole history lesson in itself, from what I'm beginning to understand)


    [​IMG]
    From the top of Rich Mt, looking east toward Harmon. The Historical Marker would be about 2 miles ahead and to the left. The Tory Camps would have been in this valley.


    [​IMG]
    Side 2 of the same marker. You are facing east if you are reading this.


    [​IMG]
    View eastbound on Rt 33/55. Harmon is just ahead about 2 or 3 miles.
  20. pnoman

    pnoman Just Average

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2006
    Oddometer:
    2,404
    Location:
    Morgantown, WVa
    Possibly the most-recognized landmark in all of West Virginia, Seneca Rocks is located about 35 miles due east of Elkins.

    Seneca Rocks is part of a series of outcroppings known as the "River Knobs" that extend from Cherry Grove to the Seneca Rocks area. There are several "razorback ridges" or "fins" along this line, including nearby Champe Rocks (see earlier Post). To read more about the River Knobs: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/River_Knobs_(West_Virginia)

    Seneca Rocks features a 900-foot sheer face of Tuscarora Quartzite, which attracts serious climbers from all over.

    For more information and history of Seneca Rocks, visit the Forest Service website: http://www.fs.fed.us/r9/mnf/sp/senrcks_txt.html

    Seneca Rocks is very special to me because I used to bring my grandparents out here in the 70s and 80s from their farm in Petersburg. We would often come out on Sunday afternoon after church to picnic and watch the climbers.

    When I retired from the USAF, they asked if I would like my retirement flag flown over the state capitol or Washington DC. I said I would like to have it flown over the Seneca Rocks Visitors Center. The Park Ranger at the time, Sue Grafton, graciously agreed, and now I have one more reason to be sentimentally attached to this site. I have it written in my will that my ashes be spread from the summit of the rocks. What better final resting place than this?


    [​IMG]
    Historical Marker located on Rt 33/28 about 100 meters south of the intersection of Rt 28/55 with Rt 33/55 and Rt 33/28.




    [​IMG]
    View of the Marker, Seneca Rocks Visitors Center, and of course, Seneca Rocks.


    [​IMG]
    A little better photo from last fall.


    [​IMG]
    View along the top - now you know why they call this formation a "Razorback" or "Fin".


    [​IMG]
    My son and I on the summit. Great view!!!