XR650L: Spud Rollers for Your Chain Guide

Discussion in 'Vendors' started by Spud Rider, Jun 4, 2011.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Spud Rider

    Spud Rider Long timer

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2008
    Oddometer:
    3,931
    Location:
    Idaho
    I'm sorry to hear that, Rufus. :eek1 Thank you reporting your problem. :nod If I may ask, do you have a 45T rear sprocket, or a larger rear sprocket? Did you use a 5/16-inch bolt, or a 3/8-inch bolt? Also, did you keep the OEM "chain slipper" behind the countershaft sprocket, or did you install a sealed bearing roller in that position?

    Spud :wave
    #21
  2. rufus

    rufus We're burning daylight...

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2004
    Oddometer:
    4,536
    Location:
    Coweta Oklahoma

    48 rear, 5/16th bolt, nothing else changed.
    #22
  3. Spud Rider

    Spud Rider Long timer

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2008
    Oddometer:
    3,931
    Location:
    Idaho
    Thank you for providing this additional information, Rufus. :nod My Spud Rollers have worn very little over thousands of miles, but I now suspect my initial success was highly dependent upon replacing the OEM "chain slipper" with a sealed bearing roller. I recently experimented by moving my single Spud roller to a higher location, and the wear was greatly accelerated by the much higher, constant, downward pressure of the drive chain upon the roller. In my experience, my Spud Rollers are much more resistant to chain impacts than the commercial chain rollers I had previously employed. Therefore, my polyurethane rollers have worn very well for me when they were placed in the OEM bolt holes, and positioned lower beneath the drive chain.

    I replaced my OEM "chain slipper" with a commercial, sealed bearing, chain roller, and it has worn very little. Therefore, this "chain slipper" roller has preserved the initial chain placement very well, and undoubtedly contributes significantly to the durability of my Spud Rollers. Here is a photograph of my commercial, "chain slipper" roller after 16,500 miles of wear.

    [​IMG]

    If I may ask, is your OEM, chain slipper worn down significantly? If so, the resulting, lower chain height might have adversely affected wear on the Spud Roller, much the same as when I raised the position of my single Spud Roller.

    If you wish to keep the OEM "chain slipper," you might wish to experiment with a single, commercial, sealed bearing roller in the same position where you had the Spud Roller installed. :nod The commercial, sealed bearing roller might be more resistant to constant pressure, but it will be less resistant to chain impacts than my Spud Rollers. :deal Of course, since you only slightly enlarged the front mounting hole in the chain guide, you can always revert to the OEM, chain guide slipper. :nod

    However, if you decide to replace the OEM "chain slipper" with a commercial, sealed bearing roller, as I did, I will be happy to send you another pair of Spud Rollers, free of charge, so you can test them, and report back whether or not the "chain slipper" roller solved the problem of accelerated wear on the Spud Roller. :nod To duplicate my successful, R&D testing, I also suggest you don't apply grease to the Spud Roller.

    Spud :wave
    #23
  4. rufus

    rufus We're burning daylight...

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2004
    Oddometer:
    4,536
    Location:
    Coweta Oklahoma
    The slipper has some wear, but it is not in bad shape.

    Thanks for them offer but I am going back to stock and putting the bike up for sale.
    #24
  5. Spud Rider

    Spud Rider Long timer

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2008
    Oddometer:
    3,931
    Location:
    Idaho
    Although my Spud Rollers wore like iron, I have stopped selling them. In fact, I have even stopped using them myself. I discovered the impact from the drive chain was causing the roller bolts to fracture the plastic chain guide. Therefore, I have removed the Spud Rollers from my chain guide. In fact, I haven't even replaced the chain guide slider. I have left the bottom of the chain guide open. Since I am not taxing the bike's suspension anywhere near its limits, I haven't had any problems result from opening the bottom of the chain guide.

    Therefore, my experiment with chain rollers is complete. If I ever decide to once again enclose the bottom of the chain guide, I will revert back to the stock, chain guide slider. :deal I have sent a personal message to this forum's moderator asking him to close this thread. I wish to thank everyone who purchased my Spud Rollers, and I wish you all ride nothing but happy trails. :nod

    Spud :beer
    #25
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.