XR650L: Spud's Oil Cooler

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by Spud Rider, Apr 14, 2012.

  1. Spud Rider

    Spud Rider Long timer

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    I have now ridden 6 thousand miles with my Spud Cooler installed. I am pleased to report this oil cooler works great, and I haven't had any problems with it whatsoever. :D

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    Spud :wave
    #81
  2. elsalvadorklr

    elsalvadorklr southern xr rider

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    awesome spud congrats again

    I need to make one sometime soon

    felt the need a couple of rides especially on the highway got up to 280f plus once

    yikes

    ride on!:D
    #82
  3. JensEskildsen

    JensEskildsen Long timer

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    Hey Spud and others.

    I've read this thread several times (and enjoyed it too) eventhough I dont own an xr650L.

    One thing I've always wondered.....Have no one tried to see what opening the fender does to oiltemps on a stock un-oilcoolered bike. Theres a little talk about it last in the thread, but nothing specific. On paper it should be a great, cheap and easy way to help cooling the bike...But sometimes, real world experiences is very different. :(:

    I own an xt600, and have cut of a couple of centimeters of the lower back part of the front fender, in an attempt to add more air to the head, but never did "the science" and meassure temps.

    Did you ever try to cover the cooler to see what that did to the temps? And did you try to cover up the the mesh screen on the fender aswell, to se what stock temps is?

    Thanks for youre time :wave
    #83
  4. elsalvadorklr

    elsalvadorklr southern xr rider

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    I did it on my xr6, it dropped the temps by a mere 5f...give or take...at speed it obviously does more, and I noticed about an 8f drop...

    Im not spud though....jejejeje

    christian
    #84
  5. Spud Rider

    Spud Rider Long timer

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    After installing my oil cooler, my oil temperatures dropped 31 degrees Fahrenheit after I switched from a fender with drilled holes to a fender with a 4"x4" slot cut in the rear of the fender.

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    Spud :wave
    #85
  6. JensEskildsen

    JensEskildsen Long timer

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    Christian, you must be the "others" then :rofl Thanks =)

    Spud, yeah I saw that, but wondered if it would have the same effect without the cooler. Going by Christian, theres very little to gain that way. :cry

    In the summer we get around 25c (77fahrenheit) here, on the interstate at 110km/h (68mph) my oiltemp will eventually climb to 120c. (248 fahrenheit) It meassures the temps in the frame, so its probably hotter elsewhere in the engine. Its not dangerously high, but perhaps a bit higher than I would want it. The same goes for singletrack/sand ect.

    Seems like theres not much to do, other than add a cooler, which I really dont want to. :huh

    The bike does have a larger gastank, which seems to "collect/gather" way more air than the stocker. Its been fine for over 110.000km so I know it wont break down because of that, but I like to improve small things, and make the bike more suited for my needs. :raabia
    #86
  7. Spud Rider

    Spud Rider Long timer

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    If your oil temperatures don't exceed 248 degrees Fahrenheit, you probably don't need an oil cooler. The engine oil coming off the piston skirt is probably the hottest oil in the bike; it's probably 50 degrees Fahrenheit hotter than the oil in the reservoir. Therefore, your highest oil temperatures are probably around 300 degrees Fahrenheit, or a little hotter. Conventional motor oil doesn't start to degrade until it reaches about 400 degrees Fahrenheit, so you are probably quite safe. I would consider installing an oil cooler when oil temperatures in the reservoir start to exceed 300 degrees Fahrenheit. :deal

    Spud :wave
    #87
  8. Spud Rider

    Spud Rider Long timer

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    If you want the greatest oil cooling to occur, it's very important to have maximum airflow over the oil cooler. A smaller oil cooler placed in maximum airflow will cool as much, or more, than a larger oil cooler with blocked air flow. My 4"x4", Baker Precision oil cooler is very well protected, and receives excellent air flow below the front fender, and over the front tire.

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    After cutting a 4"x4" slot in the rear of the front fender, my oil temperatures were as low as they were when I tested the oil cooler with the front fender completely removed.

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    I experimented by drilling holes in the front fender before I cut out the slot; the holes did not allow much airflow, and greatly reduced the oil cooler's ability to radiate heat. :deal

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    I recorded oil temperatures without a fender, and with a stock fender, before I cut any slots in my front fender. Using this method I recorded maximum oil cooling with a 4"x4" rectangle cut in the rear of the front fender.

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    The extra holes outside the 4"x4" rectangle were left over from my earlier experimentation. I don't think the extra holes help airflow, and they can be omitted.

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    Spud :wave
    #88
  9. super samurai

    super samurai Been here awhile

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    So i bought the same cooler spud purchased from bakers supply. Was like $32 and $12 for shipping.
    I researched spuds thread and came to the conclusion i wasnt that fancy on cutting my fender and lowering my fender.
    Started with some flat stock, shaped two tabs. Drilled them and tack welded two nuts for bolting the cooler to the tabs.
    #89
  10. super samurai

    super samurai Been here awhile

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    So i mocked it all up.
    Ran all my lines before i finished welding bracket on.
    Notice i put another piece of flat stock skinnier then the two tabs vertical between the tabs.
    #90
  11. bwalsh

    bwalsh Long timer

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    Nice work there super samurai! I may have to order on of those coolers and do some fabrication work. :D
    #91
  12. super samurai

    super samurai Been here awhile

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    This is howi ran my lines. Picked up some hose rated to stand up to oil from belfair hose and supply, but they should have some at any auto parts store.
    They are not ran anywhere that heat from the exhaust will be an issue.
    I had to use one little 90 deg. Stainless elbow on the line going up.
    #92
  13. super samurai

    super samurai Been here awhile

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    The cooler is tilted back towards the tank slightly.
    Dont take this as an expert set up or that i know what i am doing!:what:
    I know it is not in direct air flow but it will deff. Get some flow. Thinking more of the heat radiation which is when these bikes get hot at low speed hard riding. I do have a thermo dipstick so i can monitor temps.
    It would be easy to tap into a line to put a tto gauge later also.
    This whole set up was less then $50 doing it all myself.
    A welder, 4in cutoff wheel and 4in flap disk sander wheel for a small angle grinder.
    The paint was called noble shelter paint that seems to match the stock frame when new.
    #93
  14. Spud Rider

    Spud Rider Long timer

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    You did a nice job, Samurai! :D Thanks for documenting your work with photographs, and adding your knowledge to this thread. :nod

    Did you record oil temperatures before adding this oil cooler? If so, I would like to hear how well the oil cooler is reducing oil temperatures under the same riding conditions. :deal

    Spud :beer
    #94
  15. super samurai

    super samurai Been here awhile

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    Sorry spud i didnt record like you had done. It is winter and it has been sitting in my wood stove heated garage.
    I have not rode in awhile, been 4 wheeling. But i do recall what it was running at temp. Wise in my head. I figure anything will help. When i get out and ride when the temps are warmer or possibly sooner i will report back. Next will be the daves mods. I dont think it has been done to mine. Ohh and i picked up another stock muffler to cut open and modify.
    #95
  16. super samurai

    super samurai Been here awhile

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    They are spendy little coolers but are made pretty good, all steel.
    If you can fabricate at all it is easy, mostly time spent deciding where and how to run lines and place cooler.
    I placed mine diff. Cuz i didnt want to cut and lower fender. So other options are there.
    #96
  17. beechum1

    beechum1 Dandole Gas al Burro

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    Did you use all .375ID hose?
    #97
  18. Spud Rider

    Spud Rider Long timer

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    Yes, I used 3/8-inch hose I bought from the local, auto parts store.

    Spud :beer
    #98
  19. Andyvh1959

    Andyvh1959 Cheesehead Klompen

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    Some excellant development and results. Makes me want to plan something similar for my eventual Retro-Motard project on my old XL600. But I do have some comments that I'm not sure have been addressed:

    • Oil temps come down with the cooler, but temps above 200 F are still pretty high for engine oil in general. Use synthetic oil only?
    • Air flow behind any fender is marginal at best, so a cooler placement off to the side would be more beneficial, but more complex.
    • Flow rate/time through the cooler also impacts effective cooling, so a low restriction cooler is required because its on the low-pressure return side of the system. Flow from the bottom (inlet) to the top (outlet) of the cooler may also bring down the temps.
    • Hose temperature rating and inner tube material, must be compatible with the application.
    • Minimize the number of connections whenever possible. I applaud the idea, but WAY too many connections and hose clamps. Better hose routing and longer hose runs would simplify it.
    I have worked in hydraulic hose applications for nearly 20 years. Even a low pressure hose, when at temps above 180 F, can soften significantly, and loose the ability to maintain compression on the connection points to avoid leaks. Barbed connections, especially with hose clamps should be carefully applied. Connections with sharp barbed edges, used with hose clamps, can actually cut the hose inner tube and create leak routes in your oil system.

    Over time and heating cycles, hose will "thermal set" meaning it looses the "spring" needed to maintain a seal. Worm clamps loose their holding ability after the hose thermal sets, and leaks can develop. A constant-tension style hose clamp, or one that continues compression as the hose sets is better.

    Use beaded tube style connections where possible, along with a constant tension style hose clamp to minimize degradationo of the connection over time.

    Most low pressure hoses are not rated for oil over 212 F. Some are rated for oil up to 257 F, and some (a few) are rated to 300 F. Better to select the higher rating whenever possible. Your temp guage may read 225 F, but hot spots in the system are very likely as temperature is not always uniform in the system. The hose inner tube MUST be rated for the fluid and temperature. Otherwise the inner tube can/will break down, and possibly clog the return flow of the system and starve the pump.
    #99
  20. joexr

    joexr Banned

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    :snoreYour reputation precedes you.