XRL owners sign in.

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by onaXR, Jan 18, 2006.

  1. Schultz!

    Schultz! Recovering Lurker

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    That right there is the key! being content and or satisfied with the setup :freaky

    Its chasing the personal idea of "perfection" that get me in trouble :deal

    Simple rule I have found out, unless your either board or not happy with the way something works Don't fuck with it! :1drink
  2. Schultz!

    Schultz! Recovering Lurker

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    Fritz you hurt me allot:cry !

    Never have I claimed to be one of them Engineers.... I was and am a technician, my brain wasn't removed of all practical common sence at graduation.:lol3( i kid i kid)
  3. Mossy-Back

    Mossy-Back Brown Falcon

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    Corvallis, OR
    I'm really bad at that being content thing. So far my XR has done everything I have asked of it, but I still want to see what I can do to make it better (like a fork brace). I'm only 150 pounds soaking wet, so I haven't had much trouble with the stock springs, but the front end still dives more than I would like.

    This is also only my 2nd bike I've owned, and the first I've ridden on the street, so I have a lot of learn still.
  4. Schultz!

    Schultz! Recovering Lurker

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    One thing I forgot to point out about the rear suspension on a linkage bike is that the linkage depending on its geometry can be "progressive" or "linear". In most of my studies almost all linkage bikes have a progressive rear geometry making the force applied to the wheel while riding in the compression direction increase through the suspension travel allowing the suspension to absorb small stuff while not bottoming out when hitting harder terrain.

    So purely as a example lets say at full rebound it takes 50lbs to move the shock 10mm, at bike plus rider weight lets say (static condition) 350lbs will move the rear shock 50mm now lets say you got a bit too drunk at the local bar and scored yourself one of them "snow cows" (women in the upper parts of Michigan:evil) apply a extra 300lbs to the rider plus bike weight it will compress the rear shock let say 35mm. Once the hang over is worn off and you got away from the heffer you can plot your suspension travle based on weight vs MM. this would result in a curve, the curve will illustrate how many lbs to mm of suspension travel based on the position in the travel. knowing this can allow you to change either your spring or shock valving to better suite your needs. Another thing that allot of guys found out is using lowering links on the back of the XRL changes this geometry and from the testimony I have read it appears to allows the rear suspension to not progressively get as firm though its travel vs the stock link.


    That sexy KTM 500 that was posted has a very close to linear spring rate due to the force created by the rear wheel is not mechanically increased or decreased by a linkage setup. A old co worker had a older KTM525 (non linkage like that 500) and he was raving how a progressive rear spring really improved his suspension setup.

    Just more food for thought :freaky
  5. Schultz!

    Schultz! Recovering Lurker

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    I salute you falcon! this thing kicked my ass all over the Arizona dessert and I'm close at 140ish hence the super moto future (btw seeing the ex marine tag I'm sure your muscle mass is a bit more then my scrawny asses) :deal

    A trick some of the guys over at TT were doing is draining the stock fork fluid and replacing it with Type F ATF (no friction modifiers like normal ATF) or 10wt jack oil to help with the front end dive issue.

    My solution came via a 2000 cr250 :evil and I'm with ya on still needing to learn allot
  6. taco250

    taco250 wannabe adventurer

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    Any of you famili"ar with an inmate hear that goes by "Wachs"? I know him a little from living in Central OR and he got one of the first 525 factory DS bikes the first year they were available. He puts a Acerbis 6 gal tank on it and has ridden from Bend OR to Blackrock NV (ever heard of burning man?) several times going through the desert. He stands up most of the way. The Kmart Trash Machines are definitely on the dirt oriented side of DS but we all know that. They need more frequent maintenance 'cuz they're really tuned down race bikes. Otherwise, they're really well set up for offroad. If I could, I'd have a 250 or 300EXC for dirt play only to go along with my XRL. However, if I want to do multi day tours like TAT, the XRL is more appropriate IMO.
  7. Ben99r1

    Ben99r1 Long timer

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    You can always shim or use a spacer to stiffen up the forks. If you dont like the way it turns out. let me know and ill send you another set of stock springs that I have. check out this link. http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=761715
  8. Sierra Thumper

    Sierra Thumper Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2012
    Oddometer:
    641
    I just installed my RSW fork brace, and after contemplating how to keep the fork boots from bunching up and twisting/deforming, I came up with a super simple, easy, and reversible way to keep the boots looking and working like stock, with NO cutting or destruction of the boots in any way. And they can be put back to stock length if needed :evil

    I have my bike up on my stand for work, so its level and very easy to turn the front wheel to get to stuff. What I did is measured the distance between the fork boot pleats before I put the brace on.....then once the brace was installed, I slipped the boots down where they needed to be....and pulled down fork boot pleats until I had the same distance between the pleats as I did stock before the brace. It took 6 pleats compressed down to the bottom to get the stock fork boot length between pleats.

    I then took a vey small nail, and made 6 holes in the top of the 6th compressed pleat that lined up with the 6 drain holes in the bottom of the boots, and ran small zip ties down through the top holes and through the drain holes, and cinched them up. That compressed the bottom 6 pleats tightly together, and gave me back the stock boot length look, and looks VERY good with the brace installed.

    You need to unclamp and slide up the bottom of the fork boots of course to reach in and thread the zip ties through the drain holes......but the holes needed to be made are so small that they are completely invisible....and since I used a nail instead of slicing, the holes will never tear. So the boots could be put back to stock length with no damage whatsoever.
    You need to use the zip tie size that comes for tying excess computer wiring etc...the smallest you can find. I bought an assortment in a plastic jug from Wal-Mart, and these were the smallest in the collection.

    The finished job looks very clean and professional, and will keep your fork boots from binding/twisting and prematurely wearing out/tearing up. Plus it just plain looks good :thumb

    My wife took some pics, I'll try and post them up....but I suck at picture posting, so I can't promise anything :wink:

    I hope this helps somebody out....it was easy to do, and fixes a big problem that most of us fork brace users end up having to put up with :baldy
  9. Mossy-Back

    Mossy-Back Brown Falcon

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    Thanks for the info. I don't know about having more muscle mass, I'm pretty skinny, and I haven't really worked out in about 2 years since I got out. I would love to get some USD forks, but I've got more riding to do and other upgrades to buy before I spend money on that.

    Thanks. I'll be in touch.
  10. mendoteach

    mendoteach Long timer

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    Yeah, ain't the Renazco is it Steve? Very, cool bike if you use it like it should be used. But as a pure dirt bike, it's a pig compared to a 250 smoker, which would feel positively toy-like after riding any 450+ thumper, and it would kill me to ride that thing eight hours a day-and not just because of the seat. Now I feel better since I couldn't afford one anyway.
  11. mendoteach

    mendoteach Long timer

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    Yeah, with a sick seat and some comfy ergos, he'll yes! I would even go for a trick oil injection system and DI.
  12. mendoteach

    mendoteach Long timer

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    Good info here Schultz. I especially like your recommendation to change oil weights first. It's easy and relatively cheap. Going to a heavier oil raises and steepens the damping curve. Lighter drops and flattens it. As for after market valving bodies,, the theory behind them is (Race Tech's anyway) that the shim stack should do almost all of the damping. If the bodies end up providing any damping, you end up getting essentially an orifice type damping (ancient tech). Works okay with slow speed damping, horrible with high speed damping. Think about whacking the end of a syringe with your hand versus pushing it slowly.
  13. mendoteach

    mendoteach Long timer

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    Have I got problems if I think about riding certain bikes as much as I do, say, the Mercury girl? Now that I've thought about it, I would rather ride the Mercury girl than any bike save for a 500cc GP bike.
  14. mendoteach

    mendoteach Long timer

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    Well said. Sometimes engineers are so well educated, they become...well fools. A great driver or rider who is articulate enough enough to communicate things with engineers can tell them things they can't always predict with measurements. Sometimes they can recursively explain things the rider perceives, sometimes not. This subjective perception has driven a lot of audio innovation. Talented listeners can hear things that often take engineers a while to understand or develop measurements for. Einstein supposedly said something like, not everything that is measurable is important, and not everything that is important is measurable.
  15. mendoteach

    mendoteach Long timer

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    On the stock bike, then rear is over damped and the fork is sprung for a 115lb. rider. The rear is workable, the front is under sprung for anyone who could pick up the bike.
  16. beechum1

    beechum1 Grimace Soup

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    No comparison.
  17. beechum1

    beechum1 Grimace Soup

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    Kubiak had it down to 299.9 or sum such nonsense.
  18. mcma111

    mcma111 Long timer

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    Gee Matt. Ya trying to increase your post count or something?? :deal
  19. mendoteach

    mendoteach Long timer

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    Yeah...just trying to catch up....I get busy and don't read for a couple days, then I get board. I don't chase girls on Friday nights anymore (it was fun though)...so what am I to do? Aside from emails here and there this is my social network, and I can't get motivated to go in the garage. Don't worry your post count is safe:lol3 The carb you're sending me to try, I'm not so sure :lol3
  20. Ben99r1

    Ben99r1 Long timer

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    I just finished putting on the xr 600 exhaust on my L. The exhaust is missing the end cap. I just had on in the garage, that thing barks loud. Tomorrow am taking on it 45 mile freeway, 18 miles of twisty canyon roads, and about 20 miles of fire roads. I will be taking earplugs just in case.