XT1200Z: The new WaspWorks Super Tenere, in detail and the evolution

Discussion in 'Vendors' started by Wasp, Jul 2, 2010.

  1. Olirider

    Olirider Been here awhile

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  2. warnabrother

    warnabrother .. if you see the Rozzers

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    and while you're at it, could you please take a pic of the clearance between your rear tyre and the brake caliper support arm - thanks
  3. Wasp

    Wasp Supa10 pilot

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    Mine, 150/17 Karoo (T), is 3/8" or 9.5mm from the arm..

    [​IMG]

    Greg.
  4. warnabrother

    warnabrother .. if you see the Rozzers

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    :thumb:thumb - perfect thanks.. how do they handle on the road ??

    how have you found the new screen ??
  5. Wasp

    Wasp Supa10 pilot

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    Garmin have discontinued the GPSMap60csx to make room for the 62 series.
    Some are arguing that the older 60 was a better GPS, I have no idea so I cant comment.. All I know is that 1 week ago it was $499 and today $299..:eek1 A bit too good a deal to pass up.
    I do have a TomTom Rider2 but that is a POS for adv riding as you cant load topo maps and the bloody thing becomes corrupt every month.. Must re-load the card,

    but that problem generally only happens when you are miles from home with no idea where you are.:kboom

    Any way, hopefully those days are behind me now. Apparently the new addition of Garmin Topo Australia is due out in a couple of weeks so I will hang out for that.

    I havent picked up a power cable for it yet but have pre-wired my Aux plug in anticipation so will but one tomorrow and get it running tomorrow night.

    Does anyone with experience know if the standard Garmin mount as shown is suitable or will the GPS vibe it's way out??
    I will probably but the RAM holder in the morning just in case.

    Once I get a feel for where I like it positioned I will laser cur a stainless mount to pretty things up..

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    Greg.
  6. Wasp

    Wasp Supa10 pilot

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    Apparently they make a lot of noise, But I have a good fitting helmet and dont hear much of it..:evil

    When riding on the road with any sort of corner exit urgency you get a continuous flashing light from the dash warning that the Japanese dont trust your ability to balance the throttle with the back wheel stepping out. Probably a good thing as I am a bit older than I feel and the reflexes arent what they used to be.:D

    When riding in sandy/gravelly dirt (cant comment on mud yet) the knobs are to small to have any real traction aiding benefit under acceleration as there is so much grunt that it just spins the back wheel up very quickly as you try to apply throttle to pop the front wheel over a bump.

    That said I will probably try TKC80 or the Heid'ies next time.. TKC's to get a little more dirt grip or Heid'ies to get better road grip.

    I dunno:huh

    Bloody awsome:clap..
    You will note from the last pics that it is not on at the moment as I really prefer the look of the standard screen and my trip into the big smoke every other day is about 12kms at 110kph and the rest at suburban/city speeds.

    As I have stated in my report to Mark Lawrence (the designer):
    This is THE long distance touring screen of choice for the 2010 Yamaha XT1200ZZ Super Tenere. At touring speed there is absolutely no wind buffeting. I have the standard screen supplied with the Super Tenere as well as the Yamaha optional "High Screen". I have tried both Yamaha screens in the lower and raised mounting positions. The standard screen allows severe wind buffeting at 110kph (65mph) upwards touring speeds both positions, and the optional high screen allows moderate (but still constant and annoying) wind buffeting in both positions with the raised being only slightly better than the lowered. It is very tiring long distance as your head is getting vibrated from side to side and the noise is quite a bit louder the CalSci screen.
    -- Greg Brown waspworks.com 16/08/2010

    Greg.

    Although at the same time, it does look pretty bloody good for a touring screen...

    [​IMG]
  7. Wasp

    Wasp Supa10 pilot

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    I will have a look but I think the bicycle mount only fits up to 22mm bars and these are 28mm at the bottom..

    Greg
  8. Wasp

    Wasp Supa10 pilot

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    The optional Yamaha screen is Shite.. It is actually noisier than the other screen.

    I will ask the question on which screen I had and get back to you on here.

    Greg.

    Yes, it is the smaller of his screens... Mark calls it the medium screen..
    The production version has slighty less cutout for the handlebar releifs than mine so will look nicer on the job.

    Greg.
  9. Wasp

    Wasp Supa10 pilot

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    They cut a prototype of a standard screen.. Mark and the guys have a lot of experience with fits for most model bikes and I guess that they just added the features that are tried and tested for them and advertised for crash test dummies..

    These guys eat, drink, and shit this stuff by the sounds of it.

    [SIZE=+1]Windshields[/SIZE] [SIZE=+1]Plastics[/SIZE]
    Windshields for motorcycles are made from either polycarbonate (Lexan) or acrylic (Plexiglas). Each type of plastic has advantages and disadvantages.
    Polycarbonate is an extremely strong plastic. Polycarbonate is about as transparent as glass. Polycarbonate cuts and forms easily at both room temperature and at higher temperatures. For machining purposes, you can work with polycarbonate pretty much the same as you would aluminum. Polycarbonate has a major drawback for windshield use: polycarbonate picks up water from the air. The water eventually makes the polycarbonate cloudy. This water will form bubbles if you heat the polycarbonate to forming temperatures. So, before you can form polycarbonate, first you have to place it in a drying oven at about 200° for about 12 hours. Because of this, only companies that manufacture polycarbonate make windshields. Polycarbonate is sensitive to ammonia, so glass cleaners like Windex should not be used on polycarbonate. Polycarbonate windshields need a coating to protect them from chemicals and prevent them from absorbing water from the air. This optical coating is difficult to apply uniformly, resulting in optical distortion. It also scratches and cannot be repaired with plastic polish. By far the most popular polycarbonate for motorcycle windshields is GE Lexan Margard MR10, aka "quantum coated." GE polymers was recently bought by a Saudi Arabian firm, Sabic - see GEPlastics.com. We don't buy products from countries that fund terrorism.
    Acrylic is only about 3% as impact resistant as polycarbonate. Normal acrylic shatters upon impact, and therefore is considered an unsafe material for windshields. Acrylic is very chemically resistant, and is more transparent than glass - glass absorbs about half again as much light as acrylic does. Acrylic forms easily at high temperatures, about 300°. However, machining acrylic at room temperature is difficult. It's not very easy to cut acrylic with a saw or drill holes in acrylic without shattering or weakening the material.
    Polycarbonate is a DOT approved material for making windshields; normal acrylic is not. Some states require DOT approved windshields, and therefore in these states a normal acrylic windshield is actually illegal, however these laws are rarely enforced. Normal acrylic can be shattered by an impact from a rock moving at speeds as low as 15mph.
    A special high cost acrylic called Impact Modified Acrylic is available. This form of acrylic is DOT approved for windshields. We use only DOT certified impact resistant plastics to make Calsci windshields. Our windshields will not shatter if hit by a rock. We test our windshields by shooting them with a .22 caliber rifle and verifying that the windshield maintains its basic integrity without shedding small pieces that could impact your face or eyes. No windshield can protect you against everything, but we do our best to make certain that our windshields protect you against the small rocks frequently thrown up by other vehicle's tires.
    [SIZE=+1]Optics[/SIZE]
    Even though Calsci windshields are designed so that you look over them, not through them, we use only optically correct shapes that will not distort your vision if you do look through the shield. If you look through one of our shields at a dividing line on the highway, you'll see essentially no bending of the straight line. You'll never get a headache from looking through one of our shields.
    [SIZE=+1]Aerodynamics[/SIZE]
    Nearly all of our windshields have vents. These vents are part of the aerodynamic design of the shield, to reduce turbulence and noise. They are not there to make a flow of air on the rider. When you're riding on the highway, any windshield is pushing air away from the rider. This leaves a low- pressure pocket between the windshield and the rider. The air flowing past the motorcycle wants to drop into this low pressure area. If the outside air is allowed to spill into the area between the windshield and the rider, the result is turbulence, noise, and drafts. When outside air spills into the rider area, it almost always falls in a curved path, causing spinning vortices of air. These vortices are noisy and can cause the battering and hammering on your helmet reported by some riders. Our windshields and vents are designed to funnel air into the rider region to relieve this low pressure area and greatly reduce the tendency of outside air to spill in. The vents are designed so that the air coming through them is quickly dispersed, leaving almost no detectable air flow at the rider. Our goal is to produce almost completely still air on the rider with no back pressure.
    I get a lot of emails, "Can you make me a windshield with a reverse flip to kick the air up over my head?" Yes, I can, but I won't. Air is a spring - there are shock absorbers made with only air as the spring. When you kick a spring, it kicks back. Putting energy into the air like this is exactly the opposite of what we're all about. Windshields with reverse flips and non-fair shapes generate semi-periodic chaotic swirls of turbulent air, called Von Karman vortices, after Theodore Von Karman. These vortices, or pockets of turbulence, grow as they move away from your windshield. If you feel your head being rocked or even slammed side to side or front to back as you ride, this is Von Karman vortices at work. Some manufacturers, to my own astonishment, actually claim to produce these vortices on purpose, apparently with the idea that some turbulence is "good" and will somehow perhaps cancel out the "bad turbulence." We work very hard with the design of the shape of our windshields and the location and size of the vents to eliminate all Von Karman vortices.
    <center>[​IMG]
    Von Karman Vortices - the source of countless headaches.
    </center> Theodore Von Karman emigrated from his native Hungary to the US in 1930 to become the director of the aerodynamics laboratory at Caltech. Mark learned his aerodynamics in Von Karman labs at Caltech. Calsci windshields are designed using aerodynamic engineering principles that guarantee our shields do not generate turbulence. These are the same shapes that minimize drag and maximize fuel mileage. If you love math, give us a call and we'll tell you all the gory details. Hint: our shapes are all solutions to Laplace's equation, &#8711;²&#966; = 0, which guarantees a fair shape, that is a continuous second derivative.
    [SIZE=+1]Design[/SIZE]
    All our shields are laid out on a computer and cut with an industrial cutting laser. Our shields are symmetric to within a thousandth of an inch (.025mm). All mounting holes are also drilled with the laser, guarantying an excellent fit to your bike. This precision is necessary to be certain your riding experience will be precisely the same as all our other customers, and precisely what we engineered for your bike.
    Our windshields are designed by Mark Lawrence and Carl Porter. Carl has a Bachelor's degree and a Master's degree in engineering from Ohio State University. Mark has a Bachelor's degree in engineering from the California Institute of Technology, and is currently working on a PhD in physics at the University of Southern California. Carl and Mark don't agree very well about college football teams. Mark has a bit more than 550,000 miles of motorcycle experience. It takes about 6 weeks, eight to twelve prototypes, and typically several thousand miles to finalize a windshield design. Our windshields are not just a stock windshield made a bit wider and taller. We build and modify our prototypes until the resulting windshield is quiet, comfortable, and attractive.
  10. marklawrence

    marklawrence Adventurer

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    This is a good question, so I'll answer it.

    I bought a stock windshield from a UK Yamaha dealer and had it shipped to me. It got stuck in New York customs for 6 weeks while apparently they decided if terrorists were now making thin transparent bombs and shipping them from UK motorcycle dealers to US motorcycle windshield manufacturers. The stock shield got me the basic hole spacing and the outline of the bottom edge. It also gave me a good clue about the required space for the hand guards. I placed the stock shield on a few of our existing molds, and picked one that was close in curvature.

    I made a SWAG (Scientific Wild-Ass Guess) about the required windshield height and lower width, based on a tedious and careful study of about a dozen high-res tenere pictures lifted off the Yamaha UK web site.

    I already know preferred upper widths, as Tenere riders are presumably the same species as VStrom and GS riders.

    Our molds only make aerodynamic shapes, so I wasn't worried about making more turbulence. Sort of like if you have molds that only make good wing cross sections, then whatever you build will at least make some lift.

    We (my partner and I, both engineers) drew up a windshield, and cut one on the laser. I checked for hole and bottom edge fit, and made a few small adjustments. We cut a second shield and shipped it off to Greg for fitment and testing. It turned out most of my SWAGS were pretty good. Sometimes you get lucky.

    My first choice is to get a bike at my shop and ride it, but I don't always get my first choice. Those of you who are married know exactly what I'm talking about.

    I'm using the same procedure right now to make windshields for the Varadero and CBF1000, two more bikes that don't exist in the US.

    This is in contrast to my biggest competitor, who shall remain nameless but whose initials are near one end of the alphabet. Their windshield "designers" are four mexicans, none of whom ride motorcycles. I've met them - nice enough guys, but not exactly Stanford graduates if you catch my drift. They make up a 25 pound bag of plaster, get a stock windshield, and jam it into the plaster. Any aerodynamic mistakes made by the factory in the name of sex appeal are dutifully duplicated. They take putty knives and extend the windshield shape to make the mold wider and taller. Then they put in a flip at the top, 'cause, um, well, I've never figured out that part. My position on flips is that no airplane has one, and all the fish that looked like that got eaten 100 million years ago, there's a big hint on flips. When they're done they have a weird mold but they don't really know what works. So they have you design your own height and width when ordering, and then custom make the windshield for you a couple weeks later. Then it's your fault if it's wrong.
  11. Old Git Ray

    Old Git Ray Now retired...YeeHaa

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    Thanks Mark ...now thats what I call an answer.
    My next question is.... does it help the passenger (if anyone knows) ?
    Virtually all my riding is two up and SWAMBO gets pushed about a lot in the buffeting.
    Ray
  12. Wasp

    Wasp Supa10 pilot

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    I received a phone call from cul8rr (Steve) asking if I have had any problems with my Yamaha accessory tank bag scratching the paint on top of the fuel tank:huh:eek1.

    Steve went on to explain that he went for an extended ride on gravel/dirt roads etc, often at high speed, and upon taking the tankbag off noticed it had "scratched the shit out of the top of the tank" :cry

    He was saying it later occured to him that the wind rushing up through the steering column area is also carrying dust and dirt onto the top of the tank.. Next time I contact Steve I will ask him to send me some pics of the damage.

    I have never been comfortable with the magnet contact on the steel tank so was pretty keen (after this tragic news) to investigate the clip-on "Bags Connection" alternative.
    The Australian/New Zealand SW-Motech / Bags Connection importer, Michael Wilson from www.motorradgarage.com.au , is actually not far from me in Perth (and I used this system on my Ducati) so it's off to visit Michael to do a test fit and stock take... I actually surprised myself how much stock I managed to take while Mike was not looking...:evil

    Anyway, suffice to say I found what I was looking for (I should have just looked here in the first place) and I am all kitted up and ready to roll... SCRATCH FREE..

    There actually two bags I know of (probably more) for the Super Tenere.
    I bought the smaller "City" bag (expandable from 8 to 12lts) and find it does not sit back as far on the tank as the standard Yamaha bag.. I found the standard bag awkward for standing up in the dirt - Right at knob height:wink:
    There is another bag called the GS (expandable from 17 to 25lts) which appears about the same size as the Yamaha bag but I dont need anything that big.
    Edit: I will prabably end up getting this bag as well for "go-away, long runs"

    There are two types of engagement rings were the bag connects to the tank without actually bearing load onto the tank surface.. I found that my bag does actually touch the tank (very lightly) at the back on the down hill face but the tank is protected by the tank scuff sticker but it clears the paintwork everywhere else.
    Also,,, Heaps of pockets for wallet, glasses etc storage as you can see from the pics.
    Check out the website or send Mike an e-mail. Mike was really helpful and at the end of the day the product was at a surprisingly fair price.

    Some pics..

    Day'um - How tidy is this system??:clap
    Flasher than >:rilla

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    One very happy boy now.

    Greg.
  13. Wasp

    Wasp Supa10 pilot

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    Hey, as noted in my tank bag post above, I was digging around www.motorradgarage.com.au storage facility today,, just minding my own business, doing a stock take:evil,, and I noticed these bolt on forward control type touring pegs.. I have found previously on some long rides that I could plonk my boofy feet on the crash bars (albiet not too comfortably) just for a bit of a change of posture... Sooo, I thought I would try these things out..
    They are actually really comfortable as I managed to position them quite a way forward.
    They were cheap enough and I actually thought of Old Git Ray about to embark on a long trip with his Bride... Give some of these a try mate.. might be a good thing.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

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    They are actually quite a high quality product in Billet alluminium and anodized.
    The pegs is detented up in the stored position with a sprung ball.

    Greg.
  14. Wasp

    Wasp Supa10 pilot

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    Shit. It just occured to me,,, Michael will probably read this and wonder where the bars came from:evil

    Ok, I didnt really steal them but for what I paid I may as well have.
    Michael actually had these bars on his own bike and did not like the bend.
    I have been looking for a more "open" bend lower bar and as soon as I saw these it was a must have.
    A few bucks later and this is the result... Extremely pleased with the garage sit but have not taken it for a ride yet.

    I am not sure how these bars differ to the actual units designed for the Super Tenere (these are actually a whisker wider) but Michael will be able to sort out any inquiries..
    I havent had a look on the www.motorradgarage.com.au web site yet but I know SW-Motech have them listed for the Super10.

    Some pics..
    I love the look and feel.

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    Greg.
  15. rocca

    rocca Been here awhile

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    I was deeply suspicious of the potential for scratching with the Yamaha tankbag having had past experience of the abrasive properties of the materials they seem to insist on using at the contact points of such accessories...

    No problems so far, however, though from the outset I've been wedging a rubber strip under the front clip and also beneath the strap at the back of the tank - those being the obvious points at which chafing could occur. If the bag is held tight and the magnet is engaged then it really shouldn't be agitating any dust or sand that gets under there...
  16. R3B

    R3B Lazy Motorcyclist

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    yep, there is "One Bag to rule them All" :-)
    We started with the hoplesly Beemer bag (leaking and grossly wetting your maps) then found the Bag of Bags, the Touratech R1100GS bag, the brilliant construction of the windowsticker bottom in onjunction with its form and super simple and adaptable straps have made it usefull on all our bikes, even the Mulhacen and Tricker (250 trialtype of bike)

    [​IMG]

    The bag looks a bit used after 12.5 years of service though :-)

    it hooks at the front with two extendable hookstraps, and at the back two fast-e-ners...

    [​IMG]

    At 111 € still one of the cheapest watertight tankbags i know of...
    http://tinyurl.com/touratech-tankbag

    Although the fillercap fastener looks cool too i must say, but doesnt it go wobbly in fast chacanes so prodded on that stack ?
  17. eakins

    eakins Butler Maps

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    that tank bag look perfect. that's about as factory look as i've ever seen.
  18. SuperCruise

    SuperCruise Been here awhile

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    What be that black squiggly thing inside the seat height adjuster? I don't have one of those on mine.
  19. eakins

    eakins Butler Maps

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    looks like a lock of sorts.
  20. Wasp

    Wasp Supa10 pilot

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    No, absolutely not... The receiver mounted on the bag is a very accurate fit to the tank ring, allhough easy to align because of the horseshoe shape.
    There is also a locking spring pin that snaps in to lock the two components as the bag is pushed on..

    Greg.