Yamaha AG200 thread.

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by AG200man, Feb 7, 2015.

  1. AG200man

    AG200man AG200 Nutjob

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    I know I'm not the only one. :)

    Post up tips, trips & projects.

    [​IMG]
    #1
  2. BIG ED XT FAN

    BIG ED XT FAN Long timer

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    I do not think we have them bikes here in the USA. John Deere gators are use on the USA farms. :lol3:freaky
    #2
  3. AG200man

    AG200man AG200 Nutjob

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    You're right, Australia, South Africa, some South American countries and and they showed up in a few other countries for a year or two. Similar engine to the TW, TTr 230 & older XT 230/250 though...
    #3
  4. Kawazacky

    Kawazacky Mad Typist

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    Struth. Grew up working on many farms in Canada and never once saw a dirt bike used as farm equipment.
    #4
  5. AG200man

    AG200man AG200 Nutjob

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    Wot! You grew up in Canada? Where did you learn the word "struth"? :hmmmmm
    #5
  6. Kawazacky

    Kawazacky Mad Typist

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    Enid Blyton ...:D
    #6
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  7. Tex_Aus

    Tex_Aus Been here awhile

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    In Australia it'd be rare to come across a farm that doesn't have one!

    The AG200 in my opinion is the best farm bike available. It has a well deserved reputation for durability and reliability.

    It has a long heritage, dating back to the original AG100 & AG175. The AG200 was designed as a farm bike from the ground up, it’s not a derivative based on a trail model as some equivalent bikes from other manufacturers are.

    (I’m not saying that these others are necessarily bad bikes either by the way).

    Tex
    #7
  8. Mr. Magoo

    Mr. Magoo Bottom feeder

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    Sweet bike!:clap
    #8
  9. RustyStuff

    RustyStuff Long timer

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    Wayyyy back, it was common for farms and orchards here to use small dual sports- Running water, checking smudge pots, running fence lines. They had a half dozen different bikes on my fathers farm. Everything from their own personal motocrossers to a KE100( the most hated bike :lol ).

    Most orchards use small 4 wheelers now, I guess they operate under the assumption that everyone can hop on and drive it, unlike a bike.
    #9
  10. jasonmt

    jasonmt Been here awhile

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    We belong to a Grazing Association and about the quickest / easiest way to run all 56+ miles of fenceline is on a dirtbike; generally I will use a bike to run fence and do minor repairs off of the bike (only carrying a hammer, pliers and staples) and use a UTV for more intensive repairs. Some of the traditional guys will use horses but it takes them 3-4X the time to run the fence.
    #10
  11. eakins

    eakins Butler Maps

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    No way, anyone who can work on a farm can work a clutch.

    It's cultural. American excess. Bigger is better and all that crap :puke1

    I'd say people as a whole buy way more than they need in the US.
    No different then every car has all the options and is an auto w/ a powerful engine. Base models don't sell.

    I'd guess an Australian rancher looks at an AG200 and says perfect for the price, where as th fat American farmer looks at a 2x the price auto 400cc+ 4 wheeler or side by side and says that's what I need...no way would that tiny 200cc motorcycle work for me.
    #11
  12. eakins

    eakins Butler Maps

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    Of course it was until the marketers figured out people are willing to spend more $ in the US on bigger machines...we are our own worst enemy at times.
    #12
  13. AG200man

    AG200man AG200 Nutjob

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    I think the ATV is generally a bit more handy for most farmers here in Australia. The average age of farmers here is over 70, so 2-wheelers are starting to get beyond most farmers over that age.

    My Father still runs a farm in his 70s and he can't handle conventional ATVs anymore and has stepped up to a Rhino!

    I think two-wheel AG bikes are popular here due to weather. In our southern states where we have long, wet winters and boggy, loamy soil, the ATV is very popular. The further you move north where the country is drier, two wheels is still popular. They are much cheaper to run than an ATV too.
    #13
  14. sharkmotorcycle

    sharkmotorcycle Been here awhile

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    This is not Yamaha but Hero Impulse. 125cc bike from Asia largest motorcycle manufacturing company.
    #14
  15. AG200man

    AG200man AG200 Nutjob

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    For some reason I cant quote you Tex...so...

    The AG200 in my opinion is the best farm bike available. It has a well deserved reputation for durability and reliability.

    I agree. It's dated and gutless but it's still the only bike on the market that can be flogged mercilessly for 20000km with virtually zero maintenance and still keep going.

    It has a long heritage, dating back to the original AG100 & AG175. The AG200 was designed as a farm bike from the ground up, it’s not a derivative based on a trail model as some equivalent bikes from other manufacturers are.

    It does take a lot from the XT200 ('82-'83) actually, but the mods were a lot more involved than the current options from the other manufacturers, and even Yamaha's TTr230AG. And yes, most of the AG inspired touches were from lessons learned from the 100 & 175.
    #15
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  16. sidetrack one

    sidetrack one Chief Tiddler

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    Bloody hell, an American who's actually intelligent! Who woulda thunk it!:D You should run for President,eakins!!:deal
    #16
  17. Old fart

    Old fart Keen AG100 rider

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    Is yours a complianced one Agman? Most here in Vic don't have a plate. Cocky's being cocky's saved themselves $60 on a compliance plate so I'm not sure how many were sold for the road. Is there any way to register one without?
    We just got a non comp. one with very low K's. It hasn't been looked after much and needs a really good clean up. There is even an accessory plug on the headlight and a plug for it in the tool box. They are a great little machine for back roads touring and pretty good for the rough stuff being so light.
    Are the earlier ones without the lektric start the same motor? I would like one for general road rego as a run around but most have done a million miles and are pretty knocked around, most cocky's don't give a sh!t about machinery.
    What sort of mileage do you get from yours?
    #17
  18. AG200man

    AG200man AG200 Nutjob

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    No, mine wasn't complied, I used to run around on Rec. Rego when I was in Vic. There are complied ones out there, you just have to be patient. An option would be to get an old AG (most of the early ones were complied) and swap all the gear from a newer one into it.

    These old, early Yellow ones are worth nothing now so its probably a cheap option. The only thing I'm not sure on is if the frame where the front engine mount bolts on is the same on both models. I think that its just the mount that is different to allow the electric start to fit but I need to check to know 100%.

    The pre-electric leg is pretty much the same engine but with poor 6V electrics and with a tendency to backfire on start-up and destroy the cases around the kick-start area. Even the first of the Electric start, 12V bikes (grey bikes) had a weak stator/electrical system but the later stuff bolts straight on.

    Don't be put off by neglected ones. The engines in particular are really hard to kill and respond well to a basic freshen up like rings and a timing chain. Parts are cheap and the work is dead simple. In one of my early posts on my blog I do a write up on an engine which was the worst I'd ever seen. Even with this abuse the piston was still in spec so I put it back in with a set of rings and a new timing chain and it runs like a top to this day.
    #18
  19. Old fart

    Old fart Keen AG100 rider

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    Triffik, I'll keep an eye out for some older ones. Is Rec ego worth the trouble in Vic? From what I read you can't even ride on forestry roads. I could get cocky rego, al least that would be OK round here.
    #19
  20. AG200man

    AG200man AG200 Nutjob

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    I rode everywhere on mine! From what I could gather it was good for anything away from built up areas and main roads. Farm reg is limited to distance from your farm. There is lots of up to date info on the VicRoads site.

    Biggest issue with Rec reg was no load on the bike and it wast recognised interstate so it wasn't much good for serious distance. Full reg with compliance was the long term goal from my perspective.
    #20