Yamaha WR250R Mega Thread

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by Sock Monkey, Apr 7, 2008.

  1. Attrition

    Attrition Adventurer

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    That plastic matrix looks like [FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif] Microporous polymeric lubricants (MPL).[/FONT]

    http://www.machinerylubrication.com/Read/396/microporous-polymeric-lubricants

    From the above link:

    [FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]The microporous polymer acts like a sponge releasing and absorbing the oil. The oil is released from the polymer through capillary action to its surface and is transferred to any surface it contacts to provide the necessary lubrication. As the quantity of oil on the surface decreases, the MPL releases more oil. If excess oil becomes present, it is reabsorbed by the porous polymer.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]While MPLs generally resist contamination better than greased bearings, this does not make the bearing waterproof and will not prevent corrosion of the bearing. Direct contact with solvents, cleaners and/or acids is not recommended. Repeated exposure will deplete the oil from MPLs, making them less effective. [/FONT]


    The following link covers how to clean the MPL and the complete removal if needs be.

    http://www.thumperfaq.com/swingarm.htm
  2. bash3r

    bash3r I ain't no DingWeed

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    Yes.. that would be great!
  3. Krabill

    Krabill Long timer

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    Putting a little tension on the axle nut will keep the rear wheel from sliding around while you're adjusting the blocks. It doesn't take much, but with the nut a "little" tight, the adjustment screws will still slide the axle back without having to hold the rear wheel up against them.
  4. bash3r

    bash3r I ain't no DingWeed

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    I had to go out to the garage and check my guard seal, aka chain slider. I've been running 13/47 with 110 chain for about 7,600 miles and I have little wear on my guard. Been through two sets of tires and ride a lot of different terrain.. did close to 2,000 miles on our Idaho trip last year... so for what its worth.. I'm pretty happy with the wear I'm seeing with my setup.. Good luck Jager.. don't fret about it.. just ride buddy :thumb

    Throwing in this photo just for some eye candy.. this was a rough section of our route, steep grade up and then back down the other side.. it was a blast! The road you see between the trees on the right is were we came from.. :clap

    [​IMG]

    <param name="flashvars" value="intl_lang=en-us&photo_secret=2d7bb842cd&photo_id=4896521920&hd_default=false"></param> <param name="movie" value="http://www.flickr.com/apps/video/stewart.swf?v=71377"></param> <param name="bgcolor" value="#000000"></param> <param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><embed type="application/x-shockwave-flash" src="http://www.flickr.com/apps/video/stewart.swf?v=71377" bgcolor="#000000" allowfullscreen="true" flashvars="intl_lang=en-us&photo_secret=2d7bb842cd&photo_id=4896521920&hd_default=false" height="338" width="600"></embed>
  5. duanew1

    duanew1 In my Pajama pants

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    I thought you were wrong about this so I had to go and look it up. You are right that he said that.

    http://advrider.com/forums/showpost.php?p=9901788&postcount=4490

    I did mine the other day and I ripped out all of the so called matrix and pulled out the needle bearings that was shown in one of his pics of the other piece. That stuff does not look like a plastic matrix at all. It looks like the dried up clay base that grease is made up of. It did break easily and came out almost glued to some of the needle bearings. I got that crap out of there and replaced it with fresh grease. I might be able to dig it out of the garbage can and take a pic of it.
  6. bhd1223

    bhd1223 Been here awhile

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    Thanks for the advice RichardU and Krabill. I'll be sure to try both methods in the future.

    I went for a short ride with it all buttoned up and it didn't feel too bad but I did notice a little bit of a snatchy feeling at times when letting out the clutch. I suspect that is from the looseness. I guess it could be from the lower gearing though. It's sure easy to just clutch it forward now with the 13/47 over the stock 13/43. I can't imagine what even lower gearing would feel like. I wish I had a tach to see what kind of revs I'm running.

    Edit: Not worried about the chain tension anymore. Just read about the "updated method" put out by Yamaha. Anyways, with the bike on the sidestand and pushing up with enough force that the chain was taught, felt like excessive force would be required to make it tighter, I am at ~12mm from the swingarm, maybe a little bit less. It's late and I'm tired so I wasn't too worried when it looked about 1cm of clearance from the top of the chain to the bottom of the swingarm at the middle of the tire pressure sticker. I'm calling it good to go and will take it for a longer ride tomorrow to see how it's working in the higher gears.
  7. HardWorkingDog

    HardWorkingDog Harvey Mushman

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    A similar technique I use is to just squeeze the top & bottom chain runs with your left hand, forcing the chain towards the swingarm. This snugs the axle forward and you can then tighten the axle bolt with your right hand.
  8. Jäger 1

    Jäger 1 Osons

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    Or, on this bike, just give the back of the tire a good solid thump. Don't take much.
  9. Jäger 1

    Jäger 1 Osons

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    That's interesting.

    Well, I'll give Yamaha the benefit of the doubt and leave the MPL in place for now at least. I do wish I hadn't got after it with solvent to clean it, though... oh well. Also would prefer I had thrown out the few pieces torn loose, but I assumed the needles needed those chunkies for support.

    I think what I did was fairly MPL friendly. As there is only partial rotation there, worked the bearings around quite a bit after I had really slathered the Bel-Ray in there. Really worked it in with a finger while turning the bearing at the same time, thinking that would help the needles to move some of the grease inside the space between the needles and the matrix, etc and so forth. Hopefully that was about right, because I would never go after those with as much pressure as I did to begin with.

    Lessons learned...
  10. Dracothius

    Dracothius Berserker

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    So I've got a few questions regarding the WR. Can it handle 50k, if so can it handle 100k(miles)? How is it's subframe? Can it handle being fully loaded? Can it handle a passenger on the road and on limestone roads? NO this is not my main use for the bike but I need it to be able to do it. I do plan on riding it quite a bit and carrying my wife on the bike every so often. It seems like a really nice bike but if it can't handle these requirements I would have to go bigger. Thanks, just looking for info on the bike and seeing if it could fill the role I need it to fill.
  11. Mr. Fisherman

    Mr. Fisherman PROUD 2B Riff Raff!

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    Your gonna love it... but since I put mine on nobody comments on my pics :lol3
  12. edteamslr

    edteamslr Been here awhile

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    It's only a matter of time before someone will need to ask how big your wife is in order to answer the question. The subframe is steel and strong enough to withstand being loaded up with extra fuel and camping kit and shaken violently for weeks on rough roads (not sure what the highest mileages are on this forum for WR users but I suspect it is more than 50k miles by now). The weakness to your scenario is around whether the bike has enough power to propel the two of you in a way that doesn't drive you mad. Yes, it can take a pillion but the two of you end up sitting very closely together (with you on the narrow front, I assume) and makes the bike feel like it has half the horsepower. Which isn't very much when you've got only about 25 to begin with. The bike's suspension is also rather 'boing-gy' to begin with and while the rear spring is capable of carrying another person, I have no idea what maxing-out the rear shock will do to the handling. Don't expect miracles. So I would say - yes it can, ideally for very short periods of time but don't expect miracles or cross-continent, 2-up adventures on it.
    [as a bike that mainly for you, you just may end up buying one and loving it. that's what happened to me]
  13. Mr. Fisherman

    Mr. Fisherman PROUD 2B Riff Raff!

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  14. MoBill

    MoBill Smiles when says dat

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    This.
  15. crash a-ron

    crash a-ron mmm...burnt steel

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    Wow! Any chance you'll show us some photos of your chain? It had to be really hot as it was cutting through that rock.

    Is chain condition a common factor when folks swingarms start getting eaten?
  16. Jäger 1

    Jäger 1 Osons

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    I can go take some pics if you want. But it looks remarkably ordinary. If you're looking for a discolored chain, you'll be disappointed. If I get motivated, I will go out and do the measurement Yamaha specifies between links to determine how much it stretched. I keep meaning to do that, but with my bike back on the road and summer perhaps finally here, everytime I wander out to the garage I seem to end up going riding instead (that is, the last two whole days).

    My problems had everything to do with that evil rock, I believe. I will theorize that munched swingarms are generally the result of chains being set too tight on bikes that get a lot of time on roads where the rear suspension goes through it's full range of travel - take a look at where the wear occurs. I will further theorize that 12 tooth sprockies get blamed for this because their smaller diameter means that excessive tension has a greater effect - and the corollary is that a 14 tooth front sprockie will give you a bit of an additional buffer from damage if your chain is too tight.

    But... I'm just guessing.
  17. bhd1223

    bhd1223 Been here awhile

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    Yes, I tried that but it kept sliding back. When I loosen axle nuts I LOOSEN them. From now on I'll be leaving it rather snug when making adjustments. I noticed even slightly snug allows the wheel to slide backwards.
  18. HardWorkingDog

    HardWorkingDog Harvey Mushman

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    Whacking the tire/wheel doesn't inspire a lot of confidence, for me at least. I'm sure the screwdriver system would work (although I'm not sure I want to put that kind of stress on one link), for me it's just a lot simpler to sit behind the bike, squeeze the chain with my left hand (thumb pulling upper chain down, fingers pulling lower chain up, trying to get the chain runs to touch the swingarm) and tighten the axle nut with my right hand. I KNOW the wheel is snug against the axle blocks that way.

    Funny story, well, maybe funny...

    When we were racing (son rode, I wrenched) I was spending lots of time on tires/wheels/chains between races. It was a busy, hectic time and at some point I began to realize I was having...chest pain. Tried to ignore it for awhile, but it was getting worse so I called and was scheduled for an EKG, pretty promptly. Perfectly normal. Hmmm. A big race season was nearing the end, and I was putting on a new rear tire. I sat down to adjust the chain after replacing the wheel and suddenly figured out the source of my chest pain: I'd gotten into the habit of pushing the wheel against the axle blocks with..........my chest. Stopped doing THAT method, chest pain went away.

    :evil
  19. SkidMarx

    SkidMarx Long timer

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    Maybe a bungee around the tire and the shock. Haven't tried it, but it's worth a try.
  20. bhd1223

    bhd1223 Been here awhile

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    Maybe that's why my shoulder has been hurting. :lol3 Where's :beer when I need it?
    Just to be clear I don't whack tires, just push and put pressure on them.