Yamaha WR250R Mega Thread

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by Sock Monkey, Apr 7, 2008.

  1. HardWorkingDog

    HardWorkingDog Harvey Mushman

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2009
    Oddometer:
    2,078
    Location:
    Walnut Crick, Cal.
    agreed

    Why do you say that?

    The "2012 Street overview" lists exactly 3 models: The Super Tenere, the XT250 and the TW200. Somehow, I think there are going to be a few more street models offered in 2012. Somebody running the website is guilty of premature optimization. Or something.
  2. jtmajors

    jtmajors OCD with motorcycles

    Joined:
    May 27, 2011
    Oddometer:
    303
    Location:
    Tx
    I agree. They haven't put up 2012 R-1s, r-6s or even yzf 450 or 250. There is no way they won't offer 2012 models in those bikes.
  3. HighFive

    HighFive Never Tap-Out

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2006
    Oddometer:
    3,033
    Location:
    Okiehoma
    Triple Ho-chi-momma! [​IMG]

    Finally an EFI - exc

    Does it have a steel subframe? [​IMG]

    HF :raabia



  4. jjustj

    jjustj cum petris et choris

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2005
    Oddometer:
    6,044
    Location:
    9157 ft Dillon CO
    i want the exc500!!!!:lol3


    well not sure about SUB frame..
  5. GSBS

    GSBS FunHog

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2005
    Oddometer:
    3,986
    Location:
    Blount Springs, AL
    From the specs posted above:

    "Subframe Aluminium"
  6. Jäger 1

    Jäger 1 Osons

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2009
    Oddometer:
    819
    Location:
    NW MT/SE BC
    I don't have a sexy KTM... but my slug of a WR250R seems to get me around a little bit...

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    If I was a go-fast enduro guy, roosting my way out of every corner, lofting the wheel, and generally working up a good sweat challenging myself and the bike, then maybe I too might suffer from Orange Envy. Or 300/360/450 envy.

    But the WRR seems to carry me and my camping gear, flyfishing stuff, cameras, etc, (no Skierd surfboard yet) pretty much everywhere I want to go, without issue or complaint. It does require changing the oil and replacing tires... if KTM can make a bike that eliminates that, then I'm in.

    Otherwise, I think I'll just keep trying to wear the WRR out.
  7. emerson.biguns

    emerson.biguns All idiot, no savant

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2007
    Oddometer:
    10,999
    Location:
    The Old Pueblo
    :clap

    Been waiting to hear how it went.


    :lurk



    .
  8. Jäger 1

    Jäger 1 Osons

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2009
    Oddometer:
    819
    Location:
    NW MT/SE BC
    More info, please?
  9. bhd1223

    bhd1223 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2009
    Oddometer:
    294
    Location:
    CT
    Well here is the picture from when I first noticed it after riding it again. I can't believe I didn't notice it by just looking at the bike.
    [​IMG]

    By taking the advice of others and just loosening the lower triples I have been able to almost get it straight. I am using the tip of the fender as a reference but am also test riding. Right now the tip is just on the outside of the center TW lug and I still need to hold the bars a little crooked to go straight. By my estimations the tip on the center of the center lug would probably be perfect or as close as I'll be able to tell to perfect. I just can't seem to get the last cm or so of twist. Any advice other than twist harder?
  10. jtmajors

    jtmajors OCD with motorcycles

    Joined:
    May 27, 2011
    Oddometer:
    303
    Location:
    Tx
    Thanks for all the input. Think I'm gonna go with the mini beta plus with the rain cover. It's simple, less expensive works well based on what others have said. The mini will fit better and challenge me to take less. First ride coming up next weekend. http://texasadventure.net/Beyond Epic/Beyond Epic 4 registration.pdf 6 hours of hwy for me just to get there. After this I may love this bike even more or end up getting a freaking Tenere.
  11. GSBS

    GSBS FunHog

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2005
    Oddometer:
    3,986
    Location:
    Blount Springs, AL
    Last year when Travis Jones (of GoRace in Christiansburg VA) did my suspension upgrade, this was one of the mods he did. It does require me to carry a small 8mm socket and extension or similar. It takes eight full turns to go from normal (no camping gear) mode to the max setting that was tuned for the weight of my camping gear. Takes about 10 seconds.

    Not sure what the preload mechanism cost by itself. He did a full suspension upgrade - revalved forks, serviced and revalved shock, added a stiffer spring matched to my weight and set the sag and tuned the bike to me as a package deal in addition to the remote preload. And he did it all in a day - dropped off in the a.m. and picked up around 5 p.m., when he set the sag, etc. to tweak it all to me. Cost - 2010 - $1K. Best money I've spent on any bike.
  12. Reposado1800

    Reposado1800 Juicy J fan!

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2006
    Oddometer:
    5,815
    Location:
    5th and Main
    It helps to have 2 people. One holds the wheel between their knees and the other straddles the bike and pulls the bars in the direction needed after the pinch bolts are loosened just enough to enable the forks to move.
  13. bhd1223

    bhd1223 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2009
    Oddometer:
    294
    Location:
    CT
    Should I also loosen the uppers a little? Right now I just have the lowers loosened to where I can finger twist the bolts. I'm doing it myself from the front but may be able to get some assistance later.
  14. Jäger 1

    Jäger 1 Osons

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2009
    Oddometer:
    819
    Location:
    NW MT/SE BC
    Another vote for the Giant Loop Coyote. No compartments, but that's the idea behind any of the light soft bags out there. Compartments force their choices and location on you; waterproof bags (even the el cheapo garbage bag) don't.

    With thoughtful packing, for backcountry travel only, a Coyote is just fine. It's bulky stuff that will defeat you with a Coyote, so if it is your sleeping bag or a bunch of extra clothes causing the problem, a decent high compression bag or rethinking the clothes you will need will fix that problem. There are smaller soft bag setups out there; the problem is you can always make a slightly big bag smaller with compression straps - but there's no way to make a too-small bag bigger. I do wish the Coyote was slightly larger, about half way between it's current size and it's big brother. I haven't seen the full size Giant Loop up close, and I know some guys have used it on the WRR, but the pics I have seen of it make me think it is just slightly too big for my needs

    When I have bulky stuff along - like my flyfishing vest, waders, etc, then The North Face's small Camp Duffel mounted behind the GL works very well. Not a dry bag, but unless you shove it under water and hold it there, it keeps your stuff dry. And has detachable shoulder straps which turn it into a decent knapsack for short hikes away from the bike.

    For running around town on the bike, the Wolfman racks and bags do have some appeal. They look much easier for going grocery shopping with, easier to pack than the choreographed sequence of fitting everything in the Coyote, etc. Big bags and little bags both have their respective advantages and disadvantages.

    I can't comment on security... in Montana, for a couple of very good reasons, people generally don't mess with other peoples' stuff. I don't worry about leaving stuff on my bike where I live, so security never really enters my mind.

    For stuff wearing through soft bags... pack to ensure soft stuff only is against the bags. Anything that doesn't work for... that's why ruined tire tubes are so useful.
  15. Nice_Rumble

    Nice_Rumble Long timer

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2004
    Oddometer:
    2,352
    Location:
    New London, NH
    Sometimes to get it to go the last inch you need to abandon the knee method and place the tip of the front wheel up against a post or some other immovable object. Place the side of the tire against the post and twist hard. 2 people are better than 1 in a situation like this. You will eventually get it back to where it was. Just don't go beyond where you want it. Make small adjustments.
  16. Krabill

    Krabill Long timer

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2005
    Oddometer:
    5,047
    Location:
    Tulsa, OK
    If it were me, I'd loosen everything. Upper and lower triple clamps as well as the front axle. Get everything lined up loose, then start tightening from there. Better than forcing it, imo.
  17. Reposado1800

    Reposado1800 Juicy J fan!

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2006
    Oddometer:
    5,815
    Location:
    5th and Main
    I use the Giant Loop Coyote bag, the older style that is not 100% waterproof. I love it because once it is on, nothing moves. I can attach other stuff to the outside as well. Great bag.
  18. Nice_Rumble

    Nice_Rumble Long timer

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2004
    Oddometer:
    2,352
    Location:
    New London, NH
    If you do end up loosening both triple clamps make sure it is on a stand as the frond end will want to collapse.
  19. Mr. Fisherman

    Mr. Fisherman PROUD 2B Riff Raff!

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2006
    Oddometer:
    11,282
    Location:
    Drinking from the Stanley Cup!
    I am a Giantloop fan too.

    This is my little 250 packed up for a 10 day 1600 mile trip.

    [​IMG]

    Works great on the trails...

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
  20. bhd1223

    bhd1223 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2009
    Oddometer:
    294
    Location:
    CT
    Thanks for the tips folks. Loosening the uppers allowed me that little bit extra to get it as straight as I can tell without measuring devices or fancy gadgets. The bars appear straight when I'm going straight down the road so I'm thinking all is good.
    _____________________Before:________________________________________________ After:
    [​IMG][​IMG]